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A Newer Version of an Old Beast: The Higher Education Disaster Before COVID

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In this chapter, we take the long view of the history of higher education in the U.S. to better explain the magnitude of what happened in the COVID era, how it came to be possible and why. We review key moments in the trajectory of the re-engineering of the university as an arm of business and show that the metamorphosis began as early as the First Gilded Age, expanded throughout the twentieth century, and accelerated with the rise of neoliberalism in the 1980s and into the Second Gilded Age. We outline key ways in which racialized disaster patriarchal capitalism has played out in higher education just prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, and end with a short preview of the books’ remaining chapters.KeywordsHistory of higher educationNeoliberalism disaster patriarchal capitalismHigher education prior to COVID-19

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Incl. bibliographical notes and references, index
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