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Active exterior cloaking and mimicking for the heat equation

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We address a general inverse mimicking problem in heat conduction. The objects to cloak and mimic are chosen beforehand; these objects identify a specific set of space transformations. The shapes that can be mimicked are derived from the conductivity matrices. Numerical calculation confirms all of the analytical predictions. The technique provides key advantages for applications and can be extended to the field of waves.
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We present an active cloaking method for the parabolic heat (and mass or light diffusion) equation that can hide both objects and sources. By active, we mean that it relies on designing monopole and dipole heat source distributions on the boundary of the region to be cloaked. The same technique can be used to make a source or an object look like a different one to an observer outside the cloaked region, from the perspective of thermal measurements. Our results assume a homogeneous isotropic bulk medium and require knowledge of the source to cloak or mimic, but are in most cases independent of the object to cloak.
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