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4.K. Workshop: Promoting and enhancing health literacy through school interventions

Authors:

Abstract

The promotion and enhancement of health literacy in school-aged children is an important public health and education goal. To ensure healthy behaviours and attitudes in adulthood, children and adolescents have to learn about health and well-being early in life. Toward this goal, schools are considered the most important setting to address health literacy. Interventions delivered in schools can reach all children regardless of their social, cultural or development background. In the education sector, health literacy interventions can address not only the skills, attitudes and knowledge of students, but that of teachers, principals, health and education staff, as well as the whole school setting. Health literacy is linked to education, while it mainly addresses how people manage health information. In this context, health literacy enables children and adolescent to find, understand and critically appraise health information and use it to guide informed health decisions and promote health behaviour. While this understanding targets personal competencies of individuals, health literacy is also directed towards the environment. For example, the concept of organizational health literacy aims at increasing health literacy capacities of the environment and within settings, such as schools. This makes health literacy an important concept at the intersection of behaviour change (agency: personal health literacy) and social change (structure: organizational health literacy). While the behavioural approach is most promising to equip students with the necessary skills to act as their own agents of health information management and improve their health agency capacities, the social approach further includes consideration of social determinants of health to provide child- and adolescent-friendly environments and conditions. Therefore, effective health literacy interventions should aim at combining behavioural and social approaches, especially in such vulnerable groups as children and adolescents. The purpose of this workshop is to present and discuss four interventions on health literacy drawing on behavioural and social sciences. (i) The first presentation will introduce the Health Literacy Toolbox for Schools (Tool-HLCA). (ii) The second presentation will introduce a school curriculum for classroom based Mental Health Literacy (HLCA-IMPRES). (iii) The third presentation will provide the organizational health literacy school intervention: Health Literate Schools (HeLit-Schools). (iv) The fourth will present applied data on mental health literacy in teachers and an instrument to measure action competencies of teachers with respect to promoting their students’ mental health (MHAC). Each project will be given ten minutes to present their interventions and main findings, including time to discuss with the audiences and get feedback. The participants in turn will learn about recent empirical findings they can use in health literacy practice and policy. Key messages • Children and adolescent will benefit from early interventions to develop healthy behaviours and lifestyles in their life-course. • Health literacy is an important school topic and should be addressed within behavioural and social approaches.
and individuals with a high educational attainment is higher
compared to financially vulnerable groups (individuals at risk
of poverty or with severe material deprivation, unemployed,
singles). Also, individuals who are entitled to an increased
reimbursement of healthcare costs, show a lower use of
outpatient specialist care than expected based on their care
needs. On the other hand, increased reimbursement is effective
in improving accessibility to GP care, while for other
financially vulnerable individuals we find a lower use of GP
care.
Abstract citation ID: ckac129.245
Piloting the first health system performance
assessment for Germany: key results and learnings
Miriam Blu
¨mel
M Blu
¨mel
1
, M Achstetter
1
, P Hengel
1
, M Schwarzbach
1
, R Busse
1
1
Berlin University of Technology, Department of Healthcare Management,
Berlin, Germany
Contact: miriam.bluemel@tu-berlin.de
Background:
Health System Performance Assessment (HSPA) is a tool to
monitor and evaluate the performance of health systems and to
inform evidence-based policymaking. For the first time, a
country specific HSPA is currently being piloted for Germany.
Methods:
The HSPA is based on a newly developed conceptual
framework including nine dimensions (e.g., access, quality,
efficiency, population health). Indicators were selected based
on a systematic search of (inter)national studies and HSPA
initiatives. Where possible, indicators were analysed in their
development over time (2000-2020), in comparison to eight
European countries (e.g., Austria, Denmark, France), and
along up to seven equity dimensions (e.g., sex, age, income,
education, region).
Results:
Overall, 90 indicators were included in the HSPA. Trend and
equity analyses were possible for almost all and country
comparisons for most indicators. A few indicators could not be
analysed at all due to missing data. The overall HSPA provides
an in-detail picture of Germany’s health system. Access, for
example, can be rated as good in Germany compared to the
other countries, as insurance coverage and physician density
are high, and unmet needs and waiting times for elective
surgery are low. Results for quality are not as good, e.g., cancer
survival rates, but most indicators show a positive trend. While
population health outcomes are average in country compar-
ison (e.g., fetal and infant mortality), resource input is
comparatively high. Consequently, overall efficiency can still
be improved (e.g., amenable mortality per total health
expenditure).
Conclusions:
This first HSPA for Germany allows new insights to the
performance of the German health system which are important
for policy and research. While the pilot benefitted a lot from
previous HSPA initiatives, data availability remains one of the
biggest challenges.
4.K. Workshop: Promoting and enhancing health
literacy through school interventions
Abstract citation ID: ckac129.246
Organised by: EUPHA Working Group Health Literacy, EUPHA-HP,
EUPHA-CAPH, Technical University Munich
Chair persons: Orkan Okan (EUPHA-HP), Julia Dratva (EUPHA-CAPH)
Contact: orkan.okan@tum.de
The promotion and enhancement of health literacy in school-
aged children is an important public health and education
goal. To ensure healthy behaviours and attitudes in adulthood,
children and adolescents have to learn about health and well-
being early in life. Toward this goal, schools are considered the
most important setting to address health literacy. Interventions
delivered in schools can reach all children regardless of their
social, cultural or development background. In the education
sector, health literacy interventions can address not only the
skills, attitudes and knowledge of students, but that of teachers,
principals, health and education staff, as well as the whole
school setting. Health literacy is linked to education, while it
mainly addresses how people manage health information. In
this context, health literacy enables children and adolescent to
find, understand and critically appraise health information and
use it to guide informed health decisions and promote health
behaviour. While this understanding targets personal compe-
tencies of individuals, health literacy is also directed towards
the environment. For example, the concept of organizational
health literacy aims at increasing health literacy capacities of
the environment and within settings, such as schools. This
makes health literacy an important concept at the intersection
of behaviour change (agency: personal health literacy) and
social change (structure: organizational health literacy). While
the behavioural approach is most promising to equip students
with the necessary skills to act as their own agents of health
information management and improve their health agency
capacities, the social approach further includes consideration
of social determinants of health to provide child- and
adolescent-friendly environments and conditions. Therefore,
effective health literacy interventions should aim at combining
behavioural and social approaches, especially in such vulner-
able groups as children and adolescents. The purpose of this
workshop is to present and discuss four interventions on
health literacy drawing on behavioural and social sciences. (i)
The first presentation will introduce the Health Literacy
Toolbox for Schools (Tool-HLCA). (ii) The second presenta-
tion will introduce a school curriculum for classroom based
Mental Health Literacy (HLCA-IMPRES). (iii) The third
presentation will provide the organizational health literacy
school intervention: Health Literate Schools (HeLit-Schools).
(iv) The fourth will present applied data on mental health
literacy in teachers and an instrument to measure action
competencies of teachers with respect to promoting their
students’ mental health (MHAC). Each project will be given
ten minutes to present their interventions and main findings,
including time to discuss with the audiences and get feedback.
The participants in turn will learn about recent empirical
findings they can use in health literacy practice and policy.
Key messages:
Children and adolescent will benefit from early interventions
to develop healthy behaviours and lifestyles in their life-
course.
Health literacy is an important school topic and should be
addressed within behavioural and social approaches.
iii100 European Journal of Public Health, Volume 32 Supplement 3, 2022
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