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The Importance of Dashboard Elements During Esports Matches to Players, Passive-Viewers and Spectator-Players

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Abstract

The reporting of esports matches is mostly done via dashboards, which contain the main match stream, as well as additional information about the match. Research has shown that these dashboards should be more adaptable to different user demands. However, little is known about the relative importance of the presented information on the dashboards to different individuals and how they should be arranged. In this paper, we report on a study designed to investigate the importance and preferred placements of different dashboard elements, across three spectator types identified in literature. For this purpose, a tool allowing users to individually arrange their own dashboards for League of Legends was created. Data from 31 participants was collected with the help of a survey and by recording the positions of the self-arranged elements. Based on the results, this paper formulates more in-depth design recommendations for spectator dashboards with a focus on adaptability and the importance of its elements.KeywordsDashboardsEsportsSpectatorship

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