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Academic stress and depression among vietnamese adolescents: a moderated mediation model of life satisfaction and resilience

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Academic stress is rising among high school students, especially in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, such as social distancing, long-term online learning, and lack of social support. Many studies have also shown that students with high levels of academic stress have a higher risk of depression. However, very few researchers are interested in studying life satisfaction as a moderate factor for the indirect relationship between academic stress and depression. This study investigated whether life satisfaction factors moderate the indirect effect of academic stress on the depressive disorder in Vietnam adolescents. Participants include 1336 Vietnamese adolescents. Participants completed the Educational Stress Scale for Adolescents, Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory-II. Moderated mediation analyses were conducted using the PROCESS macro to investigate the relationship among variables. In the relationship between academic stress and depressive disorder in Vietnamese adolescents, resilience is partly mediated; life satisfaction significantly moderated the indirect effect of academic stress on depressive disorder. This study suggests that depressive disorders prevention and intervention practices for adolescents need to consider enhancing resilience and life satisfaction.
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Current Psychology
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-022-03661-3
schools, and a rise in children’s online presence (Duan et
al., 2020; Lavizzari et al., 2020; Orgilés et al., 2020; Ren et
al., 2021; Sediri et al., 2020; Tang et al., 2021; Wang, Pan,
Wan, Tan, Xu, McIntyre et al., 2020). Long durations of
social distancing, fear of contagion, inadequate knowledge,
stigmas, or nancial losses, according to some researchers,
are connected with a greater negative psychological impact
(Le et al., 2020; B. X. Tran et al., 2020). These signicant
stresses can raise the risk of mental disorders like anxiety or
depression (Huremović, 2019; Pfeerbaum & North, 2020).
Depression is one of the most common mood disor-
ders, relating to genetic and environmental risk factors,
especially exposure to stressful life events (Bouma et al.,
2008; Maughan et al., 2013). When people are subjected
to uncontrolled circumstances, they display helplessness
and a lack of drive, which leads to depression (Seligman,
1972). In this sense, people with depression are less likely
to seek help for physical or emotional symptoms. Therefore,
and similar to anxiety, depression can become a barrier to
reasonable medical and mental health interventions during
a pandemic (Asmundson & Taylor, 2020; Lei et al., 2020;
Introduction
COVID-19 has created an international public health emer-
gency, causing economies to halt, resulting in considerable
loss of life, and posing unprecedented challenges to the
global health systems economy (Alsalameh et al., 2019).
COVID-19 is raising worries about the mental health of
young people all around the world (Porter et al., 2021).
COVID-19 has also exacerbated prior stresses and intro-
duced new drivers of mental illness in teenagers, such as
stress and anxiety caused by the pandemic’s economic and
health consequences, the lockdown of public places and
Be Thi Ngoc Nguyen
ntngocbe@hueuni.edu.vn;
nguyenthingocbe@dhsphue.edu.vn
1 Department of Psychology and Education, University of
Education, Hue University, Hue City, Vietnam
2 Faculty of Education Sciences, VNU University of
Education, Hanoi, Vietnam
Abstract
Academic stress is rising among high school students, especially in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, such as social distanc-
ing, long-term online learning, and lack of social support. Many studies have also shown that students with high levels of
academic stress have a higher risk of depression. However, very few researchers are interested in studying life satisfaction
as a moderate factor for the indirect relationship between academic stress and depression. This study investigated whether
life satisfaction factors moderate the indirect eect of academic stress on the depressive disorder in Vietnam adolescents.
Participants include 1336 Vietnamese adolescents. Participants completed the Educational Stress Scale for Adolescents,
Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory-II. Moderated mediation
analyses were conducted using the PROCESS macro to investigate the relationship among variables. In the relationship
between academic stress and depressive disorder in Vietnamese adolescents, resilience is partly mediated; life satisfaction
signicantly moderated the indirect eect of academic stress on depressive disorder. This study suggests that depressive
disorders prevention and intervention practices for adolescents need to consider enhancing resilience and life satisfaction.
Keywords Academic stress · Adolescents · Depression · Life satisfaction · Resilience
Accepted: 14 August 2022
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2022
Academic stress and depression among vietnamese
adolescents: a moderated mediation model of life satisfaction
and resilience
Thi Truc QuynhHo1· Be Thi NgocNguyen1· Ngoc Phuong HongNguyen2
1 3
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