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Towards more digital wellbeing in knowledge work - A signaling theory perspective

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Abstract

Knowledge workers increasingly rely on information and communication technologies (ICT) in their work. If not managed effectively, this shift can reduce workers' wellbeing and performance. Accordingly, research on corporate digital responsibility (CDR) urges organizations to implement digital wellbeing initiatives to protect workers. In this research, we investigate which digital wellbeing initiatives are offered by organizations, expected by knowledge workers, and whether such initiatives might provide economic returns in the form of improved organizational attractiveness. Based on signaling theory and following a multi-method approach, we identify digital wellbeing initiatives from websites and social media posts of 25 technology companies and conduct semi-structured interviews with 10 students and young professionals. We discuss the conceptualization of digital wellbeing and the role of digital wellbeing for organizational attractiveness. Our findings provide a starting point for investigating business cases for CDR and can advance understanding and implementation of digital wellbeing both in research and practice.

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