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Characterisation and selection of freshwater cyanobacteria for phycobiliprotein contents

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  • Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor
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Some cyanobacteria species have a high capacity for accumulating phycobiliprotein contents in their cells. However, there is a lack of information on screening tropical freshwater cyanobacteria, particularly phycobiliproteins. In addition, it is unclear which characteristics of cyanobacteria (morphological and/or growth) could affect phycobiliprotein contents. This study aimed to screen and characterise Malaysian indigenous freshwater cyanobacteria for the growth, biomass, and pigment contents and determine the major characteristic that contributed to the variation of phycobiliproteins. The surface/volume (S/V) ratio, specific growth rate, biomass productivity, and pigment contents of the isolated cyanobacteria were analysed. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were applied to distinguish the factor responsible for phycobiliprotein variations in cyanobacteria. For the phycobiliprotein contents, Arthrospira sp., Pseudanabaena sp., and Synechococcus elongatus showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) amounts of cyanobacterial phycocyanin (C-PC), phycoerythrin (C-PE), and allophycocyanin (C-APC), respectively, than other studied cyanobacteria. This study showed no apparent trend of similarity and difference between the unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria. In addition, carotenoid contents demonstrated a positive correlation with total phycobiliproteins, C-PC and C-APC. Based on the current findings, Arthrospira sp., Pseudanabaena sp. and Synechococcus elongatus might be the promising candidate to be the C-PC, C-PE and C-APC sources, respectively, for commercial production purposes. The selection of optimal cyanobacterial strain is crucial for efficient phycobiliprotein production. This study underlined the potential of freshwater cyanobacteria in producing respective and total phycobiliproteins. Future studies such as the optimization process should be adopted to improve the phycobiliprotein production of these cyanobacteria significantly.
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Vol.:(0123456789)
Aquaculture International
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10499-022-00985-6
1 3
Characterisation andselection offreshwater cyanobacteria
forphycobiliprotein contents
HuiTengTan1· FatimahMd.Yuso2,3· YamSimKhaw1·
MuhammadFarhanNazarudin1· NurAmirahIzyanNoorMazli1· SitiAqlimaAhmad4·
NoorAzmiShaharuddin4· TatsukiToda5
Received: 17 May 2022 / Accepted: 20 September 2022
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022
Abstract
Some cyanobacteria species have a high capacity for accumulating phycobiliprotein con-
tents in their cells. However, there is a lack of information on screening tropical freshwater
cyanobacteria, particularly phycobiliproteins. In addition, it is unclear which characteris-
tics of cyanobacteria (morphological and/or growth) could affect phycobiliprotein contents.
This study aimed to screen and characterise Malaysian indigenous freshwater cyanobac-
teria for the growth, biomass, and pigment contents and determine the major characteris-
tic that contributed to the variation of phycobiliproteins. The surface/volume (S/V) ratio,
specific growth rate, biomass productivity, and pigment contents of the isolated cyanobac-
teria were analysed. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis
(HCA) were applied to distinguish the factor responsible for phycobiliprotein variations
in cyanobacteria. For the phycobiliprotein contents, Arthrospira sp., Pseudanabaena sp.,
and Synechococcus elongatus showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) amounts of cyanobac-
terial phycocyanin (C-PC), phycoerythrin (C-PE), and allophycocyanin (C-APC), respec-
tively, than other studied cyanobacteria. This study showed no apparent trend of similarity
and difference between the unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria. In addition, carot-
enoid contents demonstrated a positive correlation with total phycobiliproteins, C-PC and
C-APC. Based on the current findings, Arthrospira sp., Pseudanabaena sp. and Synecho-
coccus elongatus might be the promising candidate to be the C-PC, C-PE and C-APC
sources, respectively, for commercial production purposes. The selection of optimal cyano-
bacterial strain is crucial for efficient phycobiliprotein production. This study underlined
the potential of freshwater cyanobacteria in producing respective and total phycobilipro-
teins. Future studies such as the optimization process should be adopted to improve the
phycobiliprotein production of these cyanobacteria significantly.
Keywords Pigments, Phycocyanin· Phycoerythrin· Allophycocyanin· Sources· Principal
component analysis
Handling Editor: Ronan Sulpice
* Fatimah Md. Yusoff
fatimamy@upm.edu.my
Extended author information available on the last page of the article
Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved.
... (92.57 mg g −1 ) have been reported to have higher C-PE content than red algae ( Figure 3) [37][38][39][40]. These species have been extensively studied for C-PE synthesis and optimized for improved productivity in the literature. ...
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