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Mind and Consciousness

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This chapter discusses how Dune was groundbreaking in terms of its characters not because it gave them superhuman abilities, but because it made them three-dimensional and focused on the power of their minds. It looks at Herbert’s intense interest in the nature of human consciousness and his use of different narration styles to make characters seem like real people struggling to survive on an alien planet. The chapter examines the complexity of the characterization of the Bene Gesserit with their extraordinary abilities based on Eastern philosophical traditions such as Zen Buddhism and Yoga. It also explores Paul Atreides as a superhuman figure who takes the reader on his journey of expanding awareness and points to the possibilities of the human mind.KeywordsScience fictionFrank HerbertConsciousnessPsychologyMindEastern philosophy

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