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Environmental Learning and Communication

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Abstract

Environmental learning is an act of communication. Whether it is self-directed learning, learning through teachers or professors, or learning through an online platform, all need a learningmedium and content. Therefore, environmental learning and communication in this chapter refer to how individuals, institutions, socialgroups, and cultural communities produce, share, accept, understand, and properly use the environmental information, and then utilize the relationship between humansociety and the environment through using environmental communication. In the interaction of the social network of humansociety, from interpersonal communication to virtual communities, modern humans need to participate in environmental decision-making to understand the problems that occur in the world’s environment through environmental media reports. Therefore, this chapter could be focused on “learning as process” and, see how to learn from theorized fields of studies. We may encourage that you may learn from spoken, written, audio-visual, image, and information exchanges through carriers such as learningfields, learning plans, learning mode, information transmission, and communication media. It is hoped that environmental learning and communication, through creation, adopt diverse communication methods and platforms to establish the correct environmental information pipeline.
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