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Correction: Validation of two novel primers for the promising amplification of the mitogenomic Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I (COI) barcoding region in Artemia aff. sinica (Branchiopoda, Anostraca)

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Abstract

This note is to specify a correction to the above mentioned paper that recently appeared in: Crustaceana, 95(5-6): 585-592. DOI: 10.1163/15685403-bja10207 In this study, Artemia DNAs from Great Salt Lake (Utah, U.S.A.) were extracted using a cyst batch collected in 2002, which was registered at the cyst bank of the Artemia Reference Center (Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium) under code ARC1564. This cyst sample is now specified to comprise a mixture of Artemia franciscana Kellogg, 1906 and parthenogenetic Artemia (for more information see Endebu et al., 2013). All five sequences of COI marker (OM737930-OM737934) from Great Salt Lake belong to parthenogenetic Artemia (paper as above, table I, page 590). Their taxonomic status has been revised in the NCBI [National Center for Biotechnology Information] website (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). Please note.
Crustaceana 95 (7) 867-868
CORRIGENDUM TO:
VALIDATION OF TWO NOVEL PRIMERS FOR THE PROMISING
AMPLIFICATION OF THE MITOGENOMIC CYTOCHROME COXIDASE
SUBUNIT I (COI) BARCODING REGION IN ARTEMIA AFF. SINICA
(BRANCHIOPODA, ANOSTRACA). (CRUSTACEANA, 95(5–6): 585–592.
DOI: 10.1163/15685403-BJA10207)
BY
ALIREZA ASEM1,2), CHUN-ZHENG FU3), NING YANG2), AMIN EIMANIFAR4),
YING CAO2), PEI-ZHENG WANG4)and CHUN-YANG SHEN1,6)
1)Department of Biology, Chengde Medical University, Chengde 067000, P.R. China
2)Hainan Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Tropical Marine Fishery Resources,
Hainan Tropical Ocean University, Sanya 572000, P.R. China
3)Institute of Sericulture, Chengde Medical University, Chengde 067000, P.R. China
4)Independent Senior Scientist, Industrial District, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, U.S.A.
5)Key Laboratory for Coastal Marine Eco-environment Process and Carbon Sink of Hainan
Province, Hainan Tropical Ocean University, Yazhou Bay Innovation Institute, Sanya 572000, P.R.
China
ORCID iD: Asem: 0000-0002-8991-4903
This note is to specify a correction to the above-mentioned paper that recently
appeared in:
Crustaceana, 95(5–6): 585–592. DOI: 10.1163/15685403-bja10207
In this study, Artemia DNAs from Great Salt Lake (Utah, U.S.A.) were extracted
using a cyst batch collected in 2002, which was registered at the cyst bank of
the Artemia Reference Center (Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium) under code
ARC1564.
This cyst sample is now specified to comprise a mixture of Artemia franciscana
Kellogg, 1906 and parthenogenetic Artemia (for more information see Endebu et
al., 2013). All five sequences of COI marker (OM737930-OM737934) from Great
Salt Lake belong to parthenogenetic Artemia (paper as above, table I, page 590).
Their taxonomic status has been revised on the National Center for Biotechnology
Information (NCBI) website (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). Please note.
6)Corresponding author; e-mail: scyshenchunyang@163.com
©KONINKLIJKE BRILL NV, LEIDEN, 2022 DOI 10.1163/15685403-00004209
868 CORRIGENDUM
REFERENCE
ENDEBU,M.,F.MIAH,N.BOON,F.CATANIA,P.BOSSIER &G.VAN STAPPEN, 2013. Historic
occurrence of parthenogenetic Artemia in Great Salt Lake, USA, as demonstrated by molecular
analysis of field samples. Journal of Great Lakes Research, 39: 47-55.
First received 13 August 2022.
Final version accepted 15 August 2022. Published online 23 September 2022.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Great Salt Lake (GSL), USA is the main source of the commercially important Artemia franciscanaKellogg (1906) cysts used in larviculture. Our objective was to document the presence of parthenogenetic Artemia in GSL analysing a series of non-commercial samples harvested over the period 1997–2005. Laboratory cultures suggested that sex ratios were skewed in some years. Species-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the exon-7 of the Na/K-ATPase α-1 subunit nuclear gene and of a fragment of exon-2 of the heat shock protein HSP26 gene were used to identify samples of individual adults and pooled cysts. Additionally, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using the Na/K-ATPase marker and individual adults was used because of its greater power for detecting different alleles. Finally, the exon of the Na/K-ATPase α-1 subunit was sequenced in selected individuals to validate the results. All results indicated that there were parthenogenetic Artemia in the samples from the period 2000 to 2002. Our data do not provide evidence on the autochthonous or allochthonous nature of this population, although an anthropogenic origin seems most likely. The transitory character of the incidence of parthenogenetic Artemia can be linked to unusual environmental conditions in the lake around the turn of the century. The subsequent disappearance of the parthenogenetic population would then be due to the competition with the more productive A. franciscana population as conditions returned back to normal. A systematic genetic study of the GSL Artemia population is recommended as it may provide valuable complementary information about population changes undetected in traditional monitoring programmes.