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A review on electric vehicle transport policy of India with certain recommendations

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Abstract

India is forging ahead on the journey of adopting electric vehicles in the country with all EV fleets targeting by 2030. It seems to be quite optimistic considering that the EV fleet is still smaller than 1%. Successful market penetration of electric vehicles may not only rely on the characteristics of the technology, but also on the business models available on the market. This study is a review of Indian EV policy in order to change Indian mobility sector. It discusses the journey of Indian EV sector and how it evolved. It talks about the six key growth drivers which are responsible for EV development in India. This paper also narrates the electric vehicle policy development cycle of India with its parameters and functions. It also explains the life cycle assessment of EV for the development of economic perspective of EV in India. The Indian government needs to implement policies aimed at reducing air pollution by introducing EV’s that raise the sale of electric vehicles, increase the percentage of green energy in the Indian power mix and prevent battery production air pollution. The suggested strategies can be adapted to reduce air emissions by increasing the introduction of electric vehicles in any sector globally.Graphical abstract
UNCORRECTED PROOF
Journal : Large 43581 Article No : 48 Pages : 11 MS Code : 48 Dispatch : 30-8-2022
Vol.:(0123456789)
MRS Energy & Sustainability
doi:10.1557/s43581-022-00048-6
MRS ENERGY & SUSTAINABILITY // VOLUME XX // www.mrs.org/energy-sustainability-journal 1
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to
The Materials Research Society, 2022
A review onelectric vehicle
transport policy ofIndia
withcertain recommendations
REVIEW
KritiYadav and AnirbidSircar, Centre of Excellence for Geothermal
Energy, Pandit Deendayal Energy University, Gandhinagar, India
Address all correspondence to Kriti Yadav at Kriti.yphd15@spt.pdpu.ac.in
(Received: 12 May 2022; accepted: 22 August 2022)
ABSTRACT
Electric vehicle policy of India
Calendar degradation is the dominant factor affecting battery life expectancyin grid applications; higher cycle life and a more accu-
ratedegradation model provide better revenue, but the improvement in thelife expectancy is not significant.Electric vehicle policy of
various states of India
Electric vehicle life cycle assessment
Growth drivers of electric vehicle in India
Recommendation of modification of policies
India is forging ahead on the journey of adopting electric vehicles in the country with all EV fleets targeting by 2030. It seems to be quite
optimistic considering that the EV fleet is still smaller than 1%. Successful market penetration of electric vehicles may not only rely on the
characteristics of the technology, but also on the business models available on the market. This study is a review of Indian EV policy in order to
change Indian mobility sector. It discusses the journey of Indian EV sector and how it evolved. It talks about the six key growth drivers which are
responsible for EV development in India. This paper also narrates the electric vehicle policy development cycle of India with its parameters and
functions. It also explains the life cycle assessment of EV for the development of economic perspective of EV in India. The Indian government
needs to implement policies aimed at reducing air pollution by introducing EV’s that raise the sale of electric vehicles, increase the percentage
of green energy in the Indian power mix and prevent battery production air pollution. The suggested strategies can be adapted to reduce air
emissions by increasing the introduction of electric vehicles in any sector globally.
Keywords government policy · life cycle · recycling · transportation · energy storage
Discussion
This study represents the policy initiatives taken in world to promote
Electric Vehicle(EV) transportation. It also narrates EV policy from dif-
ferent states of India. An electric vehicle2policy development cycle
is also discussed which involves components like source of electric-
charging, market for EV, best practices to promote EV, etc. This study
also reviews the life cycleassessment and economic perspective of EV
along with the stages for disposal and recycling ofEV batteries. Certain
recommendations related to policy and other technical aspects are
given topromote EV.
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