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Abstract

In contrast to previous surveys, the present work is not focused on reviewing the datasets used in the network security field. The fact is that many of the available public labeled datasets represent the network behavior just for a particular time period. Given the rate of change in malicious behavior and the serious challenge to label, and maintain these datasets, they become quickly obsolete. Therefore, this work is focused on the analysis of current labeling methodologies applied to network-based data. In the field of network security, the process of labeling a representative network traffic dataset is particularly challenging and costly since very specialized knowledge is required to classify network traces. Consequently, most of the current traffic labeling methods are based on the automatic generation of synthetic network traces, which hides many of the essential aspects necessary for a correct differentiation between normal and malicious behavior. Alternatively, a few other methods incorporate non-experts users in the labeling process of real traffic with the help of visual and statistical tools. However, after conducting an in-depth analysis, it seems that all current methods for labeling suffer from fundamental drawbacks regarding the quality, volume, and speed of the resulting dataset. This lack of consistent methods for continuously generating a representative dataset with an accurate and validated methodology must be addressed by the network security research community. Moreover, a consistent label methodology is a fundamental condition for helping in the acceptance of novel detection approaches based on statistical and machine learning techniques.

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Flow-based data sets are necessary for evaluating network-based intrusion detection systems (NIDS). In this work, we propose a novel methodology for generating realistic flow-based network traffic. Our approach is based on Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) which achieve good results for image generation. A major challenge lies in the fact that GANs can only process continuous attributes. However, flow-based data inevitably contain categorical attributes such as IP addresses or port numbers. Therefore, we propose three different preprocessing approaches for flow-based data in order to transform them into continuous values. Further, we present a new method for evaluating the generated flow-based network traffic which uses domain knowledge to define quality tests. We use the three approaches for generating flow-based network traffic based on the CIDDS-001 data set. Experiments indicate that two of the three approaches are able to generate high quality data.
Conference Paper
Research in network traffic measurement and analysis is a long-lasting field with growing interest from both scientists and the industry. However, even after so many years, results replication, criticism, and review are still rare. We face not only a lack of research standards, but also inaccessibility of appropriate datasets that can be used for methods development and evaluation. Therefore, a lot of potentially high-quality research cannot be verified and is not adopted by the industry or the community. The aim of this paper is to overcome this controversy with a unique solution based on a combination of distinct approaches proposed by other research works. Unlike these studies, we focus on the whole issue covering all areas of data anonymization, authenticity, recency, publicity, and their usage for research provability. We believe that these challenges can be solved by utilization of semi-labeled datasets composed of real-world network traffic and annotated units with interest-related packet traces only. In this paper, we outline the basic ideas of the methodology from unit trace collection and semi-labeled dataset creation to its usage for research evaluation. We strive for this proposal to start a discussion of the approach and help to overcome some of the challenges the research faces today.
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Although the aggregated nature of exported flow data provides many advantages in terms of privacy and scalability, flow data may contain artifacts that impair data analysis. In this article, we investigate the differences between flow data analysis in theory and practice—that is, in lab environments and production networks.
Conference Paper
With exponential growth in the size of computer networks and developed applications, the significant increasing of the potential damage that can be caused by launching attacks is becoming obvious. Meanwhile, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) and Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPSs) are one of the most important defense tools against the sophisticated and ever-growing network attacks. Due to the lack of adequate dataset, anomaly-based approaches in intrusion detection systems are suffering from accurate deployment, analysis and evaluation. There exist a number of such datasets such as DARPA98, KDD99, ISC2012, and ADFA13 that have been used by the researchers to evaluate the performance of their proposed intrusion detection and intrusion prevention approaches. Based on our study over eleven available datasets since 1998, many such datasets are out of date and unreliable to use. Some of these datasets suffer from lack of traffic diversity and volumes, some of them do not cover the variety of attacks, while others anonymized packet information and payload which cannot reflect the current trends, or they lack feature set and metadata. This paper produces a reliable dataset that contains benign and seven common attack network flows, which meets real world criteria and is publicly available. Consequently, the paper evaluates the performance of a comprehensive set of network traffic features and machine learning algorithms to indicate the best set of features for detecting the certain attack categories.
Conference Paper
Acquiring a representative labelled dataset is a hurdle that has to be overcome to learn a supervised detection model. Labelling a dataset is particularly expensive in computer security as expert knowledge is required to perform the annotations. In this paper, we introduce ILAB, a novel interactive labelling strategy that helps experts label large datasets for intrusion detection with a reduced workload. First, we compare ILAB with two state-of-the-art labelling strategies on public labelled datasets and demonstrate it is both an effective and a scalable solution. Second, we show ILAB is workable with a real-world annotation project carried out on a large unlabelled NetFlow dataset originating from a production environment. We provide an open source implementation (https://github.com/ANSSI-FR/SecuML/) to allow security experts to label their own datasets and researchers to compare labelling strategies.
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Labeling data instances is an important task in machine learning and visual analytics. Both fields provide a broad set of labeling strategies, whereby machine learning (and in particular active learning) follows a rather model-centered approach and visual analytics employs rather user-centered approaches (visual-interactive labeling). Both approaches have individual strengths and weaknesses. In this work, we conduct an experiment with three parts to assess and compare the performance of these different labeling strategies. In our study, we (1) identify different visual labeling strategies for user-centered labeling, (2) investigate strengths and weaknesses of labeling strategies for different labeling tasks and task complexities, and (3) shed light on the effect of using different visual encodings to guide the visual-interactive labeling process. We further compare labeling of single versus multiple instances at a time, and quantify the impact on efficiency. We systematically compare the performance of visual interactive labeling with that of active learning. Our main findings are that visual-interactive labeling can outperform active learning, given the condition that dimension reduction separates well the class distributions. Moreover, using dimension reduction in combination with additional visual encodings that expose the internal state of the learning model turns out to improve the performance of visual-interactive labeling.
Conference Paper
Botnets have been a serious threat to the Internet security. With the constant sophistication and the resilience of them, a new trend has emerged, shifting botnets from the traditional desktop to the mobile environment. As in the desktop domain, detecting mobile botnets is essential to minimize the threat that they impose. Along the diverse set of strategies applied to detect these botnets, the ones that show the best and most generalized results involve discovering patterns in their anomalous behavior. In the mobile botnet field, one way to detect these patterns is by analyzing the operation parameters of this kind of applications. In this paper, we present an anomaly-based and host-based approach to detect mobile botnets. The proposed approach uses machine learning algorithms to identify anomalous behaviors in statistical features extracted from system calls. Using a self-generated dataset containing 13 families of mobile botnets and legitimate applications, we were able to test the performance of our approach in a close-to-reality scenario. The proposed approach achieved great results, including low false positive rates and high true detection rates.
Conference Paper
Intrusion detection is an important method for identifying attacks and compromises of computer systems, but it is complicated by rapid changes in technology, the increasing interconnectedness of devices on the internet, the growing use of cyberattacks, and more sophisticated and automated attack methods and tools used by adversaries. The challenge of intrusion detection is further complicated because, as advances are made in the ability to detect attacks, similar advances are made by adversaries to thwart those detective measures. Although numerous machine learning algorithms and approaches have proven effective in detecting cyberattacks, these algorithms have limitations, especially in dealing with adversarial environments. This study addresses the problem that there is not an effective machine learning algorithm that minimizes human interaction to train and evolve the learner to adapt to changing cyberattacks and evasive tactics. This research concludes that selective sampling of unlabeled data for classification by a human expert can result in more efficient labeling for large datasets and demonstrates a more resilient approach to machine learning that utilizes active learning to interact with human subject matter experts and that adapts to changing data, thus addressing issues related to data tampering and evasion. Full text available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7925383/
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Internet of Things (IoT) is a new paradigm that integrates the Internet and physical objects belonging to different domains such as home automation, industrial process, human health and environmental monitoring. It deepens the presence of Internet-connected devices in our daily activities, bringing, in addition to many benefits, challenges related to security issues. For more than two decades, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) have been an important tool for the protection of networks and information systems. However, applying traditional IDS techniques to IoT is difficult due to its particular characteristics such as constrained-resource devices, specific protocol stacks, and standards. In this paper, we present a survey of IDS research efforts for IoT. Our objective is to identify leading trends, open issues, and future research possibilities. We classified the IDSs proposed in the literature according to the following attributes: detection method, IDS placement strategy, security threat and validation strategy. We also discussed the different possibilities for each attribute, detailing aspects of works that either propose specific IDS schemes for IoT or develop attack detection strategies for IoT threats that might be embedded in IDSs.
Conference Paper
This paper presents a graphical interface to identify hostile behavior in network logs. The problem of identifying and labeling hostile behavior is well known in the network security community. There is a lack of labeled datasets, which make it difficult to deploy automated methods or to test the performance of manual ones. We describe the process of searching and identifying hostile behavior with a graphical tool derived from an open source Intrusion Prevention System, which graphically encodes features of network connections from a log-file. A design study with two network security experts illustrates the workflow of searching for patterns descriptive of unwanted behavior and labeling occurrences therewith.
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In recent years, Mobile Ad hoc NETworks (MANETs) have generated great interest among researchers in the development of theoretical and practical concepts, and their implementation under several computing environments. However, MANETs are highly susceptible to various security attacks due to their inherent characteristics. In order to provide adequate security against multi-level attacks, the researchers are of the opinion that detection-based schemes should be incorporated in addition to traditionally used prevention techniques because prevention-based techniques cannot prevent the attacks from compromised internal nodes. Intrusion detection system is an effective defense mechanism that detects and prevents the security attacks at various levels. This paper tries to provide a structured and comprehensive survey of most prominent intrusion detection techniques of recent past and present for MANETs in accordance with technology layout and detection algorithms. These detection techniques are broadly classified into nine categories based on their primary detection engine/(s). Further, an attempt has been made to compare different intrusion detection techniques with their operational strengths and limitations. Finally, the paper concludes with a number of future research directions in the design and implementation of intrusion detection systems for MANETs.
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This survey paper describes a focused literature survey of machine learning (ML) and data mining (DM) methods for cyber analytics in support of intrusion detection. Short tutorial descriptions of each ML/DM method are provided. Based on the number of citations or the relevance of an emerging method, papers representing each method were identified, read, and summarized. Because data are so important in ML/DM approaches, some well-known cyber data sets used in ML/DM are described. The complexity of ML/DM algorithms is addressed, discussion of challenges for using ML/DM for cyber security is presented, and some recommendations on when to use a given method are provided.