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A Scalable Microservice Infrastructure for Fleet Data Management

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Abstract

Modern Internet of Things solutions using edge devices produce large amounts of raw data. In order to utilize this data, it needs to be processed, aggregated, and categorized to enable decision making for management and end-users. This data management is a non-trivial task, as the computational load is directly proportional to the amount of data. In order to tackle this issue, we provide an extensible and scalable microservice architecture that can receive, normalize, and filter the raw data and persist it in different levels of aggregation, as well as for time series analysis.KeywordsBig dataTime seriesData managementData processing

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