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The mobility of chemical elements in the soil-orchid system has been poorly studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate the uptake and mobility of several trace (Li, Ba, Sr, Ag, Hg, and B) and macronutrients (Ca, Mg, and K) in the orchid Anacamptis morio (L.) R.M.Bateman, Pridgeon & M.W.Chase from soils in western Serbia. The sampling sites are characterized by three different bedrock types—cherts, limestones, and serpentines, which are the source of the significant chemical differences in the elemental status of the soil and plant tissues. The four-step Community Bureau of Reference sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of fractions and predict their potential phytoavailability. The orchid and soil samples were analyzed for total elemental content analysis using ICP-OES. The greatest potential for plant availability was determined for Ba and Sr, representing about 80% of the total soil content. More than 40% of Li in the soils was found to be potentially phytoavailable. Significant correlations were found between the total content of Li, B, and Sr in soils. Between 38 and 60% of Li content and more than 80% of Ba and Sr content were determined to be potentially phytoavailable by sequential analysis. The highest bioconcentration factor (> 1) was determined in the case of B and Sr for all orchid organs, while translocation factor for Li was highest in tubers and leaves. The studied elements were mainly stored in tubers and roots, indicating the exclusion strategy of A. morio as a metal tolerance mechanism. The data obtained showed significant differences in metal content in soils and plants originating from sites with different parent materials, suggesting that bedrock type and associated soil properties are important factors that determine chemical element mobility and uptake.
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Environmental Science and Pollution Research
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-022-22110-z
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Concentration andmobility oftrace elements (Li, Ba, Sr, Ag, Hg, B)
andmacronutrients (Ca, Mg, K) insoil‑orchid system ondifferent
bedrock types
IvanaMikavica1· DraganaRanđelović1· VladanDjordjević2· TamaraRakić2· GordanaGajić3· JelenaMutić4
Received: 24 January 2022 / Accepted: 15 July 2022
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2022
Abstract
The mobility of chemical elements in the soil-orchid system has been poorly studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate the
uptake and mobility of several trace (Li, Ba, Sr, Ag, Hg, and B) and macronutrients (Ca, Mg, and K) in the orchid Anacamptis
morio (L.) R.M.Bateman, Pridgeon & M.W.Chase from soils in western Serbia. The sampling sites are characterized by three
different bedrock types—cherts, limestones, and serpentines, which are the source of the significant chemical differences
in the elemental status of the soil and plant tissues. The four-step Community Bureau of Reference sequential extraction
procedure was used to determine the distribution of fractions and predict their potential phytoavailability. The orchid and soil
samples were analyzed for total elemental content analysis using ICP-OES. The greatest potential for plant availability was
determined for Ba and Sr, representing about 80% of the total soil content. More than 40% of Li in the soils was found to be
potentially phytoavailable. Significant correlations were found between the total content of Li, B, and Sr in soils. Between
38 and 60% of Li content and more than 80% of Ba and Sr content were determined to be potentially phytoavailable by
sequential analysis. The highest bioconcentration factor (> 1) was determined in the case of B and Sr for all orchid organs,
while translocation factor for Li was highest in tubers and leaves. The studied elements were mainly stored in tubers and
roots, indicating the exclusion strategy of A. morio as a metal tolerance mechanism. The data obtained showed significant
differences in metal content in soils and plants originating from sites with different parent materials, suggesting that bedrock
type and associated soil properties are important factors that determine chemical element mobility and uptake.
Keywords Anacamptis morio· Sequential extraction· Phytoavailability· Parent rock· Bioconcentration· Translocation
Introduction
Chemical elements occur in soils and plants in varying con-
centrations, and their mobility and transfer from one system
to another have been the subject of numerous studies (Krauss
etal. 2002; Li etal. 2014; Enya etal. 2019). Nevertheless,
there are still many unexplained mechanisms affecting these
processes, as they are highly element, soil, and plant spe-
cific. Certain metals and metalloids such as Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni,
and As have been widely studied in this sense (Boshoff etal.
2014; Wójcik etal. 2014; Pehoiu etal. 2020), while other
elements (such as B, Ba, Sr, Ag, Hg) remained less studied,
although their importance and distribution through anthro-
pogenic or geogenic sources are constantly increasing.
Lithium (Li) is the 30th most abundant element in the
Earth’s crust and occurs naturally in soils, with an estimated
Responsible Editor: Elena Maestri
* Jelena Mutić
jmutic@chem.bg.ac.rs
1 Institute forTechnology ofNuclear andOther Minerals
Raw Materials, Boulevard Franchet d`Esperey 86, Belgrade,
Serbia
2 Faculty ofBiology, Institute ofBotany andBotanical Garden,
University ofBelgrade, Takovska 43, 11000Belgrade,
Serbia
3 Institute forBiological Research Siniša Stanković, National
Institute ofRepublic ofSerbia, University ofBelgrade,
Bulevar Despota Stefana 142, Belgrade, Serbia
4 University ofBelgrade, Faculty ofChemistry, Studentski trg
12-16, P.O. Box51, 11158Belgrade, Serbia
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