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Nigerian Afrobeats, the Irony of Belonging and Here–Elsewhere Dialectics

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EDITOR'S NOTE Belgrade Centre for Music and Dance (BCMD) is a founder and publisher ofAccelerando: Belgrade Journal of Music and Dance. BCMD is founded to establish cooperation and communication between local artistic and scholarly scene and the world's. In order to achieve that goal BCMD launched Accelerando: Belgrade Journal of Music and Dance as an open access, double-peer-reviewed online journal. This journal allows Serbian scholars, artists, and educators to have permanent scholarly communication and interchanging of knowledge and information with the world's renown artists, scholars, schools and universities. Since knowledge is fluid and dynamic in nature, and transmitted through discourse, it is important for those who have a stake in advancing the knowledge base to participate in the discourse. Writing, as a form of communication, and publishing are ways of participating in the discourse. Research article is the end product of an investigation that has focused on a specific set of research questions. Research must be carefully planned, conceptually grounded, and methodologically sound, and must provide answers or possible answers and implications for further investigations. Accordingly, the effort of editorial board members and reviewers of Accelerando: BJMD is dedicated to help authors reach the goal and craft the articles in a way that successfully, effectively and persuasively communicates the importance of the study. Through this mutual effort, work, and cooperation we hope that our journal promote values, expanding the base of knowledge and contribute to the discourse. With best regards, Maja Marijan, Editor in Chief CONTENT CONTENT
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This article deals with the moral panic that emerged in the Netherlands when it became publicly known that under-age Nigerian girls were being smuggled into the country to be put to 'work' in the sex industry. A police investigation not only found hundreds of cases but also uncovered the fact that certain unknown and occult rituals played a part in how traffickers, 'madams' and other sex bosses appeared to keep the girls locked in this exploitative system. Soon an unspecified notion of 'voodoo' came to dominate the police operation, the public image of what was happening to these girls, and the way in which the girls were treated within the Dutch judicial system. The article deconstructs the moral panic and the images of Africa and the occult which became so crucial to the way the Dutch state tried to deal with the situation. It sets this analysis in the context of an anthropology of globalization and a cultural exploration of how issues of morality and identity are affected by "the occult economies of late capitalist relations". It concludes that to a great extent the scale of the moral panic can be understood by pointing at the rigidity of the identity politics of the Dutch nation State in previous years. Research was carried out in 1996-1998. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. in English and French
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When people migrate from one nation or culture to another they carry their knowledge and expressions of distress with them. On settling down in the new culture, their cultural identity is likely to change and that encourages a degree of belonging; they also attempt to settle down by either assimilation or biculturalism. In this paper, various hypotheses explaining the act of migration and its relationship with mental distress are described. A new hypothesis is proposed suggesting that when sociocentric individuals from sociocentric cultures migrate to egocentric societies they may feel more alienated. In order to assess and manage migrants, the clinicians need to be aware of the pathways into migration.