Article

The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922--1954 [electronic resource].

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

This dissertation argues that before the rise of television and the loss of its monopoly in 1954, the British Broadcasting Corporation was the most important arena in British society where regional cultures interacted with and interrogated a normative English culture, helping to create the hybrid dual identities of contemporary Britain. The BBC was a nationalizing institution, uniting people across the United Kingdom into a community of British listeners, regardless of class, gender, or ethnicity. Its programs stressed the importance of national unity, especially from the late 1930s, when fascism threatened to undermine British identity. Yet, in its policies and programs, the BBC created spaces for the expression of other national identities in Britain: Scottishness, Welshness, and Ulsterness. Drawing primarily on archival and published primary sources, and using the methodology of the "four nations" approach to British history, this dissertation explores the changing contours of the BBC's representation of Britishness. The BBC used two British institutions, in particular, to construct a unitary, consensual British national identity, the Empire and the Monarchy. The BBC vigorously projected the Empire, often representing it as the common heritage and destiny of all the peoples of Britain. The BBC promoted Empire into the 1950s, after the process of decolonization was underway, suggesting that a kind of imperial culture lasted in Britain well after the end of the Second World War. The BBC also constructed the Monarchy as an institution to which Britons could safely profess their loyalty as an expression of their British nationality, without compromising their Scottish, Welsh, or Irish identities. Similarly, the BBC did not act as an agent of Anglicization or English cultural hegemony, but rather it fostered the development of national identity in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The BBC established radio networks, responsible for reflecting the geography, history, and culture of their locality, in each of these regions. Although part of the BBC, the regional radio networks fought for, and were given, considerable autonomy, enabling them to engage in a limited, but significant, nation building program. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 67-01, Section: A, page: 0300. Adviser: Thomas William Heyck. Thesis (Ph.D.)--Northwestern University, 2005.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... For social democratic defenders of the BBC the specter of Reith represents reassurance that the BBC is no threat to conservatism, when broadcasting in the 1930s was dominated by state openings, royal anniversaries, visits, deaths and births, and by the Coronation, and when "Reith's greatest coup was the annual Christmas message delivered by the Monarch" (Curran & Seaton, 2009: 115;Hajkowski, 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
The current study aims to explore the ideological representation of Vladimir Putin and Volodymyr Zelensky in BBC's online profiles to see how socio-political ideologies are embedded with the help of semiotic resources within images and their accompanying texts. These ideologically loaded media representations are a medium used to build social realities and political opinions of the public. The selected data, nine images and their captions alongside details, are analysed by adopting Machin's framework of multimodal analysis together with Fairclough's model of representation of social events and van Leeuwen's representation of social actors. The analysis rigorously focuses on the conscious choices of the BBC editors in terms of visual and linguistic features of the profiles and embedded structures of power relations which are represented as common-sense social constructs. The findings suggest that BBC's profiles are far from neutral and they have used discourse and semiotic resources to represent Putin as rigid, vastly powerful and a threat, whereas Zelensky is shown as amiable but dauntless in the face of war and political strife.
Article
The current study aims to explore the ideological representation of Vladimir Putin and Volodymyr Zelensky in BBC's online profiles to see how socio-political ideologies are embedded with the help of semiotic resources within images and their accompanying texts. These ideologically loaded media representations are a medium used to build social realities and political opinions of the public. The selected data, nine images and their captions alongside details, are analysed by adopting Machin's framework of multimodal analysis together with Fairclough's model of representation of social events and van Leeuwen's representation of social actors. The analysis rigorously focuses on the conscious choices of the BBC editors in terms of visual and linguistic features of the profiles and embedded structures of power relations which are represented as common-sense social constructs. The findings suggest that BBC's profiles are far from neutral and they have used discourse and semiotic resources to represent Putin as rigid, vastly powerful and a threat, whereas Zelensky is shown as amiable but dauntless in the face of war and political strife.
Article
The current study aims to explore the ideological representation of Vladimir Putin and Volodymyr Zelensky in BBC's online profiles to see how socio-political ideologies are embedded with the help of semiotic resources within images and their accompanying texts. These ideologically loaded media representations are a medium used to build social realities and political opinions of the public. The selected data, nine images and their captions alongside details, are analysed by adopting Machin's framework of multimodal analysis together with Fairclough's model of representation of social events and van Leeuwen's representation of social actors. The analysis rigorously focuses on the conscious choices of the BBC editors in terms of visual and linguistic features of the profiles and embedded structures of power relations which are represented as common-sense social constructs. The findings suggest that BBC's profiles are far from neutral and they have used discourse and semiotic resources to represent Putin as rigid, vastly powerful and a threat, whereas Zelensky is shown as amiable but dauntless in the face of war and political strife.
Article
Full-text available
In September 2019, Naga Munchetty, a BBC presenter, was charged by the corporation as having breached its guidelines in sharing her personal experience of racism in reaction to Donald Trump's “Go Back” outburst at four female political opponents, an incident understood worldwide as a racist attack. The BBC, acting on complaints from some viewers, upheld that Munchetty had partially breached its journalistic guidelines in speaking about her experience of racism. This article, through a postcolonial critique of the incident, argues that the BBC guidelines and the censure of Munchetty have to be viewed through an organizational “dual consciousness” of the libidinal economy of the BBC as part of the British Empire and being an active broker of race relations in Britain through the national broadcasting space as a public service broadcaster. The BBC, both as an organization and a broadcaster, is inscribed through its historicity and a long trajectory of “fixing” the identity of the racial “Other.” In the Munchetty controversy, her racial subjectivity is made “uncanny” or alien to the racialized subject through the BBC's organizational ethos of “objectivity and impartiality” to reassemble race as fiction within its “regime of representation.”
Chapter
In recent decades, media history has become increasingly prominent, with scholarship emerging from a wide variety of disciplines. This chapter examines the methodological issues involved in conducting historical research in media studies. Using Adrian Bingham's Family Newspapers? and Laura Beers's Your Britain as case studies, it explains such topics as historical context, locating primary sources, and the production and reception of media texts. In addition, it outlines the wide variety of historical approaches that can be employed, including textual analysis, policy history, institutional history, and biography.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.