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Enhancing participation intentions in online brand communities

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Abstract

Purpose This study conceptualizes and validates a model of participation intentions in online brand communities by including perceived brand authenticity and consumer-brand relationship as its antecedents. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from different online brand communities' members. In total, 465 responses were analyzed through structural equation modeling. Findings The study's findings establish that the continuity, credibility, and integrity dimensions of perceived brand authenticity significantly strengthen the consumer-brand relationship, which ultimately influences the consumers' participation intentions in online brand communities. Research limitations/implications Future research should examine the applicability of the proposed model to the customer-created online brand communities. Consumer participation intentions may be compared across product categories. Originality/value The findings contribute to the emerging and important area in marketing by highlighting the importance of brand authenticity and consumer-brand relationship in developing an urge to participate in online brand communities.

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This study extends brand community research by proposing and testing a model of user participation in brand communities. The study conceptualize three levels of antecedents of brand community participation (individual, relationship, and group) based on qualitative results and an extensive literature review. The empirical analysis derives from data pertaining to car brand communities in Taiwan and supports most of the hypotheses. However, some differences emerge between Taiwanese and Western car brand users with regard to relationship-level factors. In addition, perceived critical mass accounts for some social mechanisms that underlie members' decisions to participate in the brand community. Finally, a quantile regression analysis extends prior literature by showing that different rules of exchange motivate brand users, depending on their participation levels. The paper discusses the managerial implications of these findings as well as several important research issues and avenues.
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Why do people feel emotional attachment to events occurring before they were born? This paper examines ad-evoked vicarious nostalgia-induced longing for a time period that an individual did not live through. Vicarious nostalgia impacts brand heritage and leads to stronger brand attachment. Qualitative research (Study 1) and a literature review identify two vicarious nostalgia dimensions fantasies about past eras and emotions. Initial quantitative research (Study 2) refines these measures, while subsequent quantitative research (Study 3) relates vicarious nostalgia to both antecedents (alienation, fantasy proneness, and nostalgia proneness) and consequences (brand heritage and brand attachment). Self-referencing moderates the relationship between nostalgia proneness and fantasies, while vicarious nostalgia partially mediates the relationship between nostalgia proneness and brand heritage. Both individual propensities (nostalgia proneness) and advertising-evoked vicarious nostalgia enhance or build brand heritage perceptions.
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The increasing presence of firm-hosted online travel communities is motivating significant changes in the travel industry. This study attempts to explain consumers’ intentions to participate in such communities, and other consumer behavioral intentions, on the basis of a model that integrates the Theory of Planned Behavior, the Technology Acceptance Model, and Social Identity Theory. In addition, this research investigates the link between the intention to participate in a community and two behavioral intentions that may benefit the host firm: the intention to use the firm’s products/services and the intention to recommend the host firm. The results reveal that the chosen theories provide an appropriate framework for explaining the intention to participate; this intention in turn has a positive effect on the two other behavioral intentions. On the basis of the results, the authors propose some key conclusions and managerial implications.
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This paper investigates the effects of brand misconduct on a consumer–brand relationship. Brand misconduct describes a brand's behavior that disappoints consumers' expectations of the brand, for example the alleged use of child labor in soccer ball factories contracted by Adidas, Nike and Puma. Based on relationship and congruency theory, this paper develops a model to explain consumer–brand relationship and its impact on consumers' repurchase intentions. According to this model, functional congruence, actual and ideal self-congruence, partner quality and brand relationship quality represent factors determining repurchase intention. An empirical investigation with regard to jeans brands serves to test the postulated relationships in two distinct situations: before and after brand misconduct. On the one hand, the findings provide a deep insight into the consequences of brand misconduct. On the other hand, the results enable practitioners to develop sustainable brand strategies and create lasting brand preferences.
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We performed a study to determine the influence that perceived usability has on the user's loyalty to websites that they visit. The results of the empirical analysis confirmed that the trust of the user increases when the user perceived that the system was usable and that there was a consequent increase in the degree of website loyalty. In the same way, greater usability was found to have a positive influence on user satisfaction, and this also generated greater website loyalty. Finally, it was found that user trust was partially dependent on the degree of consumer website satisfaction.
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We investigate two key group-level determinants of virtual community participation—group norms and social identity—and consider their motivational antecedents and mediators.We also introduce a marketing-relevant typology to conceptualize virtual communities, based on the distinction between network-based and small-group-based virtual communities. Our survey-based study, which was conducted across a broad range of virtual communities, supports the proposed model and finds further that virtual community type moderates consumers' reasons for participating, as well as the strengths of their impact on group norms and social identity. We conclude with a consideration of managerial and research implications of the findings.
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Authenticity is a cornerstone of contemporary marketing practice yet confusion surrounds the nature and use of authenticity in the brand arena. We identify six attributions of authenticity based on an examination of the strategies of 20 ultra-premium wineries and interviews with 30 wine consumers. These six attributes are: heritage and pedigree, stylistic consistency, quality commitments, relationship to place, method of production, and downplaying commercial motives. These attributes of authenticity resonated with consumers. The attributes of authenticity were both real and stylized versions of the truth.
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Despite recurring concerns about common method variance (CMV) in survey research, the information systems (IS) community remains largely uncertain of the extent of such potential biases. To address this uncertainty, this paper attempts to systematically examine the impact of CMV on the inferences drawn from survey research in the IS area. First, we describe the available approaches for assessing CMV and conduct an empirical study to compare them. From an actual survey involving 227 respondents, we find that although CMV is present in the research areas examined, such biases are not substantial. The results also suggest that few differences exist between the relatively new marker-variable technique and other well-established conventional tools in terms of their ability to detect CMV. Accordingly, the marker-variable technique was employed to infer the effect of CMV on correlations from previously published studies. Our findings, based on the reanalysis of 216 correlations, suggest that the inflated correlation caused by CMV may be expected to be on the order of 0.10 or less, and most of the originally significant correlations remain significant even after controlling for CMV. Finally, by extending the marker-variable technique, we examined the effect of CMV on structural relationships in past literature. Our reanalysis reveals that contrary to the concerns of some skeptics, CMV-adjusted structural relationships not only remain largely significant but also are not statistically differentiable from uncorrected estimates. In summary, this comprehensive and systematic analysis offers initial evidence that (1) the marker-variable technique can serve as a convenient, yet effective, tool for accounting for CMV, and (2) common method biases in the IS domain are not as serious as those found in other disciplines.
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Purpose – The importance of virtual brand communities is growing day by day as a result of consumers increasingly using online tools to contact fellow consumers in order to get information on which to base their decisions. For this reason, this work aims to explore some of the effects of participation in a virtual brand community on consumer behaviour. Design/methodology/approach – The paper proposes the positive effects of participation in a virtual community on both consumer trust and loyalty to the product, brand or organisation around which the community is developed. In addition, it also proposes a positive effect of trust on consumer loyalty. After the validations of measurement scales, the hypotheses are contrasted through structural modelling. Findings – The data, obtained through a web survey using members of several free software virtual communities, show that participation in the activities carried out in a virtual community may foster consumer trust and loyalty to the mutual interest of the community (the free software in this case). In addition, the study also found a positive and significant effect of consumer trust on loyalty. Research limitations/implications – Data were collected thanks to a web survey using Spanish-speaking subjects. Practical implications – The high costs every company has to face in order to get new customers make it increasingly necessary to reinforce the ties established with customers. In this respect, this study has shown that managers may foster consumer trust and loyalty by developing virtual brand communities and promoting consumers' participation in them. Originality/value – Most of the works that are focused on virtual communities have been conducted at the conceptual level. Thus, with the aim of moving on this topic, this study analyses empirically the effects of participation in a virtual brand community on consumer behaviour.