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Value Creation and Value Acquisition Under Open Innovation--Theoretical Review and Future Research Directions

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Any open innovation business model must consider the relationship between value creation and value acquisition of all participants in the value network. Based on Chesbrough’s point of view, this paper reviews the literature on the value creation and value acquisition mechanisms under the open innovation model, and summarizes the following five aspects: the dominant logic of corporate technological innovation; the possession system of open innovation; open innovation Innovative organizational model; value network of open innovation; relationship between open innovation and performance; creation and transfer of organizational knowledge. On this basis, the future research direction is proposed: the innovation mechanism of small and micro enterprise teams under open innovation, and the future research prospects are proposed from five aspects.

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