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Yorùbá Indigenous Musical Jingles on COVID-19: A Content Appraisal

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Abstract

This chapter appraises the content of Yorùbá musical jingles on COVID-19, since music is an important aspect of the Yorùbá culture and effective tool for socialisation. This is aimed at establishing the roles of music in sensitising community members about the pandemic, especially in the Yorùbá context. Five jingles were accessed from the YouTube and purposively selected because of their indigeneity to the Yorùbá culture. The sociology of literature provides the theoretical orientation upon which the contents of the selected music jingles are appraised in relation to the ethos of the Yorùbá indigenous music. The selected jingles were transcribed and content-analysed. The findings revealed that the selected Yorùbá music jingles revolve around information about what COVID-19 is, its origin, symptoms, effects and preventive measures, prayers against COVID-19, tributes to medical practitioners/government, a call for trado-medical approach and jokes. These are in tandem with the socialisation purpose of music in the Yorùbá society. Songs are used in the Yorùbá culture to pass comments on current social issues, educate and entertain members of the society. The chapter, therefore, concludes that COVID-19 sensitisation jingles effectively educate listeners and entertain them without distorting the message.
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