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Effectiveness Of Structured Teaching Programme On Knowledge And Practice Regarding Hand Washing Among General People At Selected Slum Area Of Kanpur

Authors:
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
4101
EFFECTIVENESS OF STRUCTURED TEACHING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE
AND PRACTICE REGARDING HAND WASHING AMONG GENERAL
PEOPLE AT SELECTED SLUM AREA OF KANPUR
Mrs. Jasmi Manu1, Ms. Anshu Devi2, Ms. Anubha Tiwari2, Ms. Chuilih Wangsu2,
Ms. Mira Pal2, Mr. Nagendra Yadav2, Ms. Pooja Kharwar2
Principal cum H.O.D Obstetrics and Gynecology Nursing 1, Student Nurses2
Faculty of Nursing Rama University, Mandhana Kanpur Uttar Pradesh India
Abstract
Hand washing is the vital preventive measures to all infection. The present descriptive research study was
conducted in Rama University. The sample were collected by Non-Probability Convenient Random Sampling
Technique with a sample size of 50 general slum people of Mandhana Kanpur UP. The data collected by using self
structured questionnaire and observational checklist. The result of the study, In pre-test 66% of the people had poor
knowledge, 32% of people had good knowledge and 2% of people had very good knowledge and no people had
excellent knowledge. In post test 72% of people were having very good knowledge, 18% of people were in excellent
knowledge on hand washing and 8% people were in good knowledge, where only 2% of people had poor
knowledge. While assessing the knowledge mean of pretest was 6.38. The mean post test knowledge score was
18.3 and mean difference was 11.92 and practice pre score was 7.16 and practice post score was 15.36 and table
value was 2.62 and T value was 16.85. Correlation’s’ was -0.2331 and p-value was NS. p>0.05 We concluded that
the study significantly proofs that there is a remarkable improvement in the knowledge and practice of general slum
people.
Key words: Effectiveness, Structured Teaching Programme, Knowledge, Practice
Introduction
Developing countries are still facing the heavy load of infectious diseases. Hands are the Important part of
the human body. Most of the daily activities are conducted by the hands. Hands and fingers are the main source of
the spread of infections. (1).
During various daily activities, our hands are in contact with the things which are soiled with various types
of pathogens. Hand born infections transmission is responsible for auto-infection by the faeco-oral route seen in
threadworm infestation or through foot handlers. Hence get polluted even though they do not sound that way.
Microscopic germs and viruses can attach to our hands and make us sick if we are not careful to clean our hands
often. Our hand has roughly 5000 germ sat any given time. (2,3)
Many people fall in sickness or illness due to poor hand washing. As per world health organizations, around three
million kids are dying below five years every years ,as they suffering from ART infections4.88% of death
declared due to poor hygienic practices ,water poor sanitation5.
Need for the Study
Repeated hand washing keep the person away from micro-organism /germs .Many studies emphasized that,
effectiveness of personal hygience behaviour includes good hand washing we should promote globally .the
importance of the above mentioned hand washing practices definitely relief maximum magnitude of problems in
rural and slum area. Understanding normal hand washing always gives a baseline information to improve sanitation
and water quality.
Keeping all these points ,the investigator decided to assess the knowledge and practices related to hand washing of
general people further giving educational instructions to them.
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
4102
Problem Statement
Effectiveness of structured teaching program on knowledge and practice regarding hand washing among general
people of selected slum area at Kanpur, UP.
Objectives of the present study are to:-
1. Assess the knowledge and practice of slum people regarding hand washing.
2. Evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme (STP) on knowledge and practice regarding hand
washing among slum people.
3. Associate the selected demographic variable with knowledge and practice regarding hand washing among slum
people.
4. correlate the knowledge and practice of people.
Hypothesis
H1: There is significant difference between pre and post-test knowledge and practice regarding hand
washing among slum people before and after structured teaching programme.
H2: There is significant association of selected socio demographic variables and health related variables
with pre-test level of knowledge and practice of hand washing among slum people.
H3: There is a correlation between knowledge and practice.
Methodology:
Research Approach-Quantitative evaluatory research approach used in this current research
Research Design Used for the present research was A pre-experimental one group pre and post-test design.
Research Setting
The study done among general people of slum area who are attend age more than 15years both male and
female at Mandhana Kanpur. This area is located in Kanpur.
Variables
Independent variables denotes structured teaching program regarding hand washing.
Dependent variables
dependent variables indicates knowledge and practices on hand washing technique among general people
of slum area in Mandhana Kanpur who are attend the age more than 15 years.
Demographic variable
In this research demographic variable are age, gender, family monthly income, ownership of house, having
BPL card etc.
Population
It refers to all people who are living in slum areas of Kanpur.
Target population
General people those are living in slum area of Mandhana Kanpur.
Accessible population
Explains general people who completing their age more than 15 year and living in the slum area of
Mandhana Kanpur.
Sample
Refers to the general people of slum area who were completing age more than 15 years and living in
Mandhana Kanpur. Who fulfilled the inclusive criteria at Mandhana Kanpur district Uttar Pradesh.
Sample Size
A sample of 50 general people of slum area who were age more than 15 years and living in slum area of
Mandhana Kanpur and also those who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected in main study
Sampling Technique
A non-probability convenient sampling used to find the samples
Criteria for sample collection
Inclusion criteria
1. General people of slum area whose age more than 15 year and living in slum area of Kanpur.
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
4103
2. People whose age more than 15
3. People who knows and handle Hindi.
Exclusion criteria
1. People who are not ready to involve in the research
Description of the Tool
A tool was developed to assess the knowledge and practice regarding hand washing among general slum
people at Mandhana Kanpur.
Tool contains three parts:
Part 1 – Socio Demographic data
Part 2 – Structured knowledge questionnaire
Part 3- check list for practice of hand washing
Part 1:. It contains socio- demographic information ie. age, sex, family monthly income, ownership of
house, having BPL card.
Part 2: Structured knowledge questionnaire included 28 multiple choice question. It included Introduction,
definition, benefits principles following for hand washing, article needed , indications and procedure for hand
washing.
Table 1: Scores according to their level of knowledge
S. N Level of knowledge Score markings Range
1. Poor 0-7 0-25%
2.
Good
8
-
14
26
-
50%
3. Very good 15-21 51-75%
4. Excellent 22-28 76-100%
Part 3: check list for practice of hand washing. Check list included 20 points regarding practice of hand washing
Table 2: Scores according to their practice
S. N Practice Score markings Range
1.
Poor
0
-
5
0
-
25%
2.
Good
6
-
10
26
-
50%
3. Very good 11-15 51-75%
4. Excellent 15-20 76-100%
Result and Findings
1.Percentage wise distribution of general people as per their demographical variables.
Majority of slum area people (44%) was belonging to age group 21-25years.
Majority of slum area people (58%) was female.
Majority of slum area people (60%) was uneducated.
Majority of slum area people (64%) had not BPL card.
Majority of slum area people (58%) family monthly income below 3000.
Majority of slum area people (70%) had own house.
Majority of slum area people (62%) belong to nuclear family.
Majority of slum area people (72%) belongs to Hindu religion.
Majority of slum area people (68%) had source of water by hand pump
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
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Section-B
Table No. 3: Distribution of knowledge level of people according to pre-test.
n=50
Sl. No. Knowledge level Frequency Score In
Percentage
Mean Mean
Percentage
SD
1Poor 33 66%
2Good 16 32% 6.38 22.78% 2.71
3Very Good 1 2%
4Excellent 0 0%
Total 50 100%
Figure No. 1: distribution of knowledge level of people according to pre-test
(Table 3, Fig 1) indicates that in pre-test 66% of the people had poor knowledge, 32% of people had good
knowledge and 2% of people had very good knowledge and none of people had excellent knowledge. With mean
6.38 and Standard Deviation as 2.71.
TableNo.4: Distribution of knowledge level of people after STP n=50
Sl. No
Knowledge level Frequency Score In
Percentage
Mean Mean
Percentage
SD
1Poor 1 2%
2Good 4 8% 18.3 65.35% 3.50
3Very Good 36 72%
4Excellent 9 18%
Total 50 100%
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
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Figure No.2: Distribution of knowledge level of people according to post-test
(Table 4, Fig 2) indicates that in posttest 72% of people were having very good knowledge, 18% of people
had excellent level of knowledge and 8% people have good level of knowledge, where only 2% of people had poor
knowledge. With mean 18.3 and Standard Deviation as 3.50.
Section-C
Table No. 5: Distribution of practice level of people according to pre-test
N=50
Sno Level Of Knowledge Frequency Score In Percentage Mean Mean Percentage SD
1Poor 17 34%
2
Good
27
54%
3Very Good 6 12% 7.16 35.8% 2.5
4Excellent 0 00%
Total 50 100%
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
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Figure No. 3: distribution of practice level of people according to pre-test
(Table 5, Fig 3) indicates that in pre-test 54% of the people had good practice, 34% of people had poor
practice and 12% had very good practice where none of the people had excellent level of practice. With mean 7.16
and Standard Deviation as 2.50.
Table No.6: Distribution of practice level of people according to post-test
N=50
Sn Level of Knowledge Frequency Score In Percentage Mean Mean Percentage SD
1
Very Good
25
50%
15.36
76.8%
1.69
2
Excellent
25
50%
Total 50 100%
Figure No.4: distribution of practice level of people according to post test
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
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(Table 6, Fig 4) indicates that in post-test 50% of people shown very good level of knowledge and 50% of
people drawn excellent level of knowledge, where no one had poor or good knowledge. With mean 15.36 and
Standard Deviation as 1.69.
Section D
Table No.7- Effectiveness of structured- teaching programme (STP) on knowledge of hand washing among
people n=(50)
Sl .No. Level of Knowledge Mean Standard Deviation ‘t’-Value Table Value Remark
1. Pre-test 6.38 2.71
25.04 2.26 Significant
2. Post-test 18.3 3.53
The above table shows that mean value of pre-test and post-test score were 6.38 and 18.3 and SD were
2.17 & 3.5 respectively. It reveals , mean post-test knowledge level (18.3) was increased than mean pre-test
knowledge level (6.38) of people and SD of post-test (3.53) was bigger than SD of pre-test (2.71) indicating
improvement in the knowledge. Hence H1 is accepted.
Table No.8- effectiveness of structured teaching programme(stp) on practice of hand washing among people
n=50
SL .No. Level of Practice Mean Sd T-Value Table Value Remark
1. Pre-test 7.16 2.58 16.85 2.62 significant
2. Post-test 15.36 1.69
The above mentioned table reveals that the mean post-test practice level (15.36) were surpassing than the
mean pre-test practice score (7.16) of people and SD of post-test (1.69) was lower than SD of pre-test (2.58)
indicating improvement in the practice level of people. There is significant difference between pre-test and post-test
practice level of people regarding hand washing.
Section-E Association of Demographic Variables with their Pre-Test Knowledge level .
Aassociation of the pretest score of people’s knowledges with selected demographical variables like age,
gender, educational status, BPL card, income, ownership of the house, types of family, religion and water supply at
home. There was no significant association noted in between the variables with their knowledge level. Hence the
formulated research hypothesis H2was rejected, H0the null hypothesis was accepted.
Section-F Association Demographic Variables with their Practice level of handwasing among people in slum
area.
Association of the pre-test score of people’s practices with selected demographic variables like age, gender,
educational status, having BPL card, family income, ownership of the house, type of family and water supply. The
formulated research hypothesis H2 was rejected, H0the null hypothesis was accepted.
Section-G
Table No.9 shows that the coefficient of correlation between knowledge and practice n=50
Area Knowledge score Practice score Correlation ‘r’ p-value
Overall 3.20+6.4 3.58+7.16 -0.2331 NS .p>0.05
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)
ISSN: 1308-5581 Vol 14, Issue 03 2022
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The above table explains about mild degree of negative correlation between knowledge and practice score.
‘r’ value -0.2331 was not significant (0.10) at 0.05% level of not significance.
Conclusion
In a Nutshell, From the above tables and figures a structured teaching program on knowledge and practice
regarding hand washing among general slum people were found remarkable improvements and more effective. STP
had a great impact on the knowledge and practice of general people to create appropriate awareness regarding hand
washing.
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Hand washing and gloving practice among healthcare worker in medical and surgical wards in a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • M Basurahah
  • T Mandani
M.Basurahah and T.Mandani, "Hand washing and gloving practice among healthcare worker in medical and surgical wards in a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia," infectious diseases, vol.38, pp.620-624, 2006.
  • V A Curtis
  • Danganah
  • R V Aunger
Curtis VA, Danganah, Aunger RV, planned motivated and habitual hygiene behaviour: Anelever currently review, Health Education research 2009; 655-673.
  • M Likosek
  • C Bern
  • R L Guerrant
Likosek M, Bern C, Guerrant RL, the global burden of diarrheal disease as estimated from studies published between 1992 and 2000. Bulletin of the world health organization. 2003:81: 197-204.