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Math Discourse Linguistic Components (Cohesive Cues within a Math Discussion Board Discourse)

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A model of the relations among cognitive precursors, early numeracy skill, and mathematical outcomes was tested for 182 children from 4.5 to 7.5 years of age. The model integrates research from neuroimaging, clinical populations, and normal development in children and adults. It includes 3 precursor pathways: quantitative, linguistic, and spatial attention. These pathways (a) contributed independently to early numeracy skills during preschool and kindergarten and (b) related differentially to performance on a variety of mathematical outcomes 2 years later. The success of the model in accounting for performance highlights the need to understand the fundamental underlying skills that contribute to diverse forms of mathematical competence.
Controlling communication processes in e-learning scenarios
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Bodendorf, F. (2009). Controlling communication processes in e-learning scenarios. In Proc. Conf. Web-Based Education.
A man left Albuquerque heading east: Word problems as genre in mathematics education
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Gerofsky, S. (2004). A man left Albuquerque heading east: Word problems as genre in mathematics education (Vol. 5). Peter Lang.
Effect of students' self-directed learning abilities on online learning outcomes: Two exploratory experiments in electronic engineering
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