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Möbius evolver: Competitive exploration of urban massing strategies

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  • White Lioness Technologies
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Abstract

During the early stages of design exploration, competing design strategies are typically considered. This chapter presents a design method, supported by a novel type of evolutionary algorithm, that maintains a heterogeneous population of design variants based on competing design strategies. Each strategy defines its own search space of design variants, all sharing a common generative concept or idea. A population of design variants is evolved through a process of selection and variation. As evolution progresses, some design strategies will become extinct while others will gradually dominate the population. A demonstration is presented showing how a designer can explore competing strategies by running a series of iterative evolutionary searches. The evolutionary algorithm has been implemented on a cloud platform, thereby allowing populations design variants to be processed in parallel. This results in a significant reduction in computation time, allowing thousands of designs to be evolved in just a few minutes.

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... The design optimization process generates and evaluates a large number of design variants and identifies highperforming solutions for the design problem. When design optimization is applied in practice, an iterative process consisting of multiple evolutionary runs is typically required (Chen et al., 2022;Janssen et al., 2022;Likai Wang, 2022). In each iteration, the designer tweaks the process by adjusting the design generation and evaluation, so as to improve the quality of design variants being evolved. ...
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