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Designing Missions: Mission-oriented innovation in Sweden — A practice guide by Vinnova

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Designing Missions: Mission-oriented innovation in Sweden — A practice guide by Vinnova

Abstract

Designing Missions is a playbook for innovating how we innovate. It describes a new toolkit of techniques for mission-oriented innovation, drawn from real experiments on the ground. Mission-oriented innovation means not only fundamentally rethinking how innovation happens and what it is, but also the ways in which government, business and society interact. Yet although the theories behind missions have been pounced upon by hungry innovation experts everywhere, there are still precious few examples of mission-oriented innovation in practice. This book closes that gap, at least a little, by sharing the stories of how Vinnova, the Swedish government’s innovation agency, interpreted and explored mission-oriented innovation in Sweden between 2019 and 2022. The book also explores the backstory: the origin of these new methods and mindsets, and why missions are important. Drawing from real-world prototypes and projects, it shows how people, places, and the public and private sectors can be central to these new innovation practices, and how it may be possible for governments at all levels to work together around these shared agendas and complex systems, changing from within in order to deliver on truly ambitious societal outcomes
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