Article

Stories of value: Business model innovation adding value propositions articulated by Slow Storytelling

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Abstract

This article proposes an empirically derived method, Slow Storytelling, to construct and articulate value propositions, as a contribution to Business Model Innovation. Organizational actors and customers must be clear on what value an enterprise, product or service offers. This is increasingly important for products and services that leverage social, cultural, and environmental values. However, few existing models provide the framework and method to facilitate business articulation of value proposition for stakeholders. Our participatory ethnographic study conducted before and during COVID-19 in craft micro-enterprises in Uzbekistan addresses this gap. We co-created a novel method, ‘Slow Storytelling’, to innovate, enhance and articulate value propositions, by mobilizing and communicating the social, cultural, and environmental values; for example, by explaining the lived and sustainable history of the product. The method consists of eight steps to elicit consumers’ emotional connection with craft producers and trigger attention towards their social and environmental impact. Slow Storytelling can be adopted beyond our craft setting, to support the construction and articulation of value propositions.

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br/>In the context of incubators, particularly those that are driven to achieving social objectives, this paper investigates core processes that support the development of social innovation. Social innovation as this paper argues is underpinned by a new form of social collaboration and engagement built upon strong forms of sharing knowledge and learning. Coupled with this is the element of social capital reinforced by entrepreneurship and leadership that promotes sustainability in the community. These factors drive innovative thinking and ways of engaging among stakeholders in order to create new forms of socio-economic impact. Such value-creating activity occurs in firms that operate within incubators involving a wide range of stakeholders who work through networks to co-create and meet social challenges. Through a case study of a social incubator and an incubatee, we demonstrate the core processes that irradiate the argument on social innovation. The contribution of this paper is threefold: firstly, social innovation is an emerging area of research, of which there is a dearth in terms of examining the processes empirically. We address the gap in this field by demonstrating the value of social collaboration and engagement using different innovation models. Secondly, we establish links between social innovation and incubation using the concept of social capital. This allows us to achieve our third contribution: exemplification of a dyadic value-based partnership and collaboration processes between an incubator and an incubatee, through activities driven by social innovation which aim to have social impact. The paper concludes with practice implications and suggests directions for future research.<br/
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Consumers act and interact via social media networks and online brand communities, collectively generating brand culture. In this context, organisations have the opportunity to develop a cultural following. The respective task for brand managers and marketers is to understand how consumers collectively generate online brand culture? Using active and overt netnography and investigating the specific context of the Behance Network, the findings presented here demonstrate that online brand community members collectively generate brand culture in variant ways: through construction of self, emotional relationships, storytelling and ritualistic practices. Pragmatically, this work demonstrates that online brand community members are curators of online brand culture and netnography offers a window through which to identify what actions and interactions need to be facilitated and fostered.
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Companies, the authors argue, are increasingly turning toward business model innovation as an alternative or complement to product or process innovation. Drawing on extensive research they conducted over the course of the last decade, the authors define a company's business model as a system of interconnected and interdependent activities that determines the way the company "does business" with its customers, partners and vendors. In other words, a business model is a bundle of specific activities - an activity system - conducted to satisfy the perceived needs of the market, along with the specification of which parties (a company or its partners) conduct which activities, and how these activities are linked to each other. Business model innovation can occur in a number of ways: (1) by adding novel activities, for example, through forward or backward integration, (2) by linking activities in novel ways, or (3) by changing one or more parties that perform any of the activities. Changes to business model design can be subtle, the authors note; even when they might not have the potential to disrupt an industry, they can still yield important benefits to the innovator. The authors offer a number of examples of business model innovation and pose six questions for executives to consider when thinking about business model innovation: 1. What perceived needs can be satisfied through the new model design? 2. What novel activities are needed to satisfy these perceived needs? 3. How could the required activities be linked to each other in novel ways? 4. Who should perform each of the activities that are part of the business model? 5. How is value created through the novel business model for each of the participants? 6. What revenue model fits with the company's business model to appropriate part of the total value it helps create?
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The concept of business models has reached global impact, both for company's competitive success and in management science. Its application by authors from diverse areas has led to a previously very heterogeneous comprehension of the concept. Yet, by means of investigating its origin and theoretical development, we state a recently converging business model view. Further, based on analyzing business model definitions, perspectives and components in the literature, we newly define the concept and portray its essential components in an integrated framework. Finally, the compilation of the current state of business model research yields the article's main findings. In this regard, via database search we quantitatively identify 681 peer-reviewed articles. Further, we qualitatively analyze them according to individual research areas that we adopt from an appropriate heuristic frame of reference. In this way, we identify four essential research foci: innovation, change & evolution, performance & controlling and design. In triangulation with assessing future research perspectives through a survey of twenty-one international experts, they also consider the areas of innovation, change & evolution, and design to be significant for the future development of the business model research field.
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The study of trust-related outcomes has had a long tradition in the organizational literature. However, few have considered potential darker sides of trust or have explored its effects in the setting of entrepreneurial ventures. This study does so by examining how perceptions of entrepreneurs and angel investors concerning the degree of trust in their relationship impact the latter’s assessments of venture performance. Hypotheses are tested using survey data from the lead entrepreneur and angel investor of 54 ventures. Results indicate that angel investors evaluate portfolio company performance more positively when they perceive high trust, whereas entrepreneurs’ trust perceptions are negatively associated with angel investors’ assessments of venture performance. Further, these effects are partially mediated by the quality of information exchanges between both parties. Together, these findings point to the benefits as well as threats that come with the presence of strong trust in entrepreneur–angel investor relationships.
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This paper provides the first formal model of business model innovation. Our analysis focuses on sponsor-based business model innovations where a firm monetizes its product through sponsors rather than setting prices to its customer base. We analyze strategic interactions between an innovative entrant and an incumbent where the incumbent may imitate the entrant's business model innovation once it is revealed. The results suggest that an entrant needs to strategically choose whether to reveal its innovation by competing through the new business model, or conceal it by adopting a traditional business model. We also show that the value of business model innovation may be so substantial that an incumbent may prefer to compete in a duopoly rather than to remain a monopolist. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Over the past few decades, there has been renewed interest in the social economy, especially in relation to the employment crisis and the reshaping of State’s interventions. The social economy plays an important role in solving new social problems with pioneering solutions, especially in the field of public services. It is important to better understand its innovative function. This article discusses the notion of social innovation and explains how it can be used as an analytical framework for understanding the social economy. The case of Québec’s social economy housing serves to illustrate this proposition.