Article

A Checklist of the Mammals of Rwanda

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Abstract

Despite its small geographical size and its tumultuous recent political history, Rwanda is home to a diverse mammal fauna. Having reviewed 53 published books and papers, including the six volumes of Mammals of Africa, I have developed a simple checklist of all mammals recorded within Parc National des Volcans, Akagera National Park, Nyungwe National Park, and along the eastern shore of Lake Kivu. With a few exceptions, almost all of Rwanda's mammal species are represented in these four areas. A total of 205 species were identified within these four areas, though the presence of some species may be in doubt, some may become locally extirpated, and a few additional species may be found with more ground surveys.

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... (Samudio Jr. & Pino, 2014). Although species reports are numerous, many come from lowland research (Handley Jr., 1966;Samudio Jr., 2002). This Bat fly species behavior is an important selective factor driving evolution of host specific and even position specific parasites (ter Hofstede et al., 2004) and may to some extent be an explanatory factor in the observed patterns of Laboulbeniales. ...
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De Jong, Y.A., Cunneyworth, P., Butynski, T.M., Maisels, F., Hart, J.A. & Rovero, F. 2020. Colobus angolensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020: e.T5142A17945007. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T5142A17945007.en.
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A rough population estimate of large ungulates in the Akagera National Park, Rwanda
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