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What are the experiences of people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) using activity monitors?: A qualitative scoping review

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Abstract

Symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include breathlessness, coughing and/or wheezing. Activity monitors (e.g., apps or wearables) could support interventions to increase activity levels. This qualitative scoping review explored the experiences of people with COPD using technology for monitoring physical activity. Scientific databases were searched from 01/01/2016 to 16/03/2021 and twelve studies were included. Seven themes were developed using thematic synthesis: 1) Monitoring and keeping track of their activity and health, 2) Motivational tool to be active, 3) Acceptability of the device, 4) Experiencing technical issues with the device, 5) Appropriate and achievable goals for their health condition, 6) Integrating the device into their life and daily routine, and 7) Benefits of using the device. This review provides insight into how people with COPD experience monitoring technology. Further understanding is needed to explore how people with COPD use monitoring technology in everyday life and to help self-manage their condition.
What are the experiences of people
with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary
Disease (COPD) using activity
monitors?:
A qualitative scoping review
Laura J Wilde
Doctoral Capability and Development Conference (DCAD22)
27th April 2022
www.laurawilde.co.uk @laurawilde24wildel5@uni.coventry.ac.uk
CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY
DISEASE
3rd leading cause of death worldwide
Symptoms of COPD make it difficult to exercise
Physical inactivity highly prevalent but essential for
mental and physical health
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ACTIVITY MONITORS AND COPD
Widely used in interventions
Increase physical activity levels (e.g. step counts)
Evidence is limited can increase motivation to be
active and awareness of physical activity
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AIM
To explore the
experiences of using
technology for
monitoring physical
activity among
people with COPD
within the published
literature
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DATABASE
SEARCHES
1st January 2016
16th March 2021
Extensive search
strategy
Screening: titles,
abstracts and full
texts
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INCLUSION
CRITERIA
Adults (18+)
Used a device (app
or wearable)
Monitored physical
activity (steps,
distance, heart rate)
Qualitative or mixed
methods
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DATA ANALYSIS
Thematic synthesis
(Thomas & Harden, 2008)
Coded line by line
Develop themes
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THEMES FROM 12 INCLUDED PAPERS
1
Monitoring and
keeping track of
their activity and
health
5
Setting
appropriate and
achievable goals
for their health
condition
2
Supporting
motivation to be
active
6
Integrating the
device into their
life and daily
routine
3
Acceptability of
the device
7
Perceived physical
and psychological
benefits of using
the device
4
Experiencing
technical issues
with the device
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1. MONITORING AND KEEPING TRACK OF THEIR ACTIVITY AND
HEALTH
Helpful or useful to monitor and
increase their physical activity
Keep track and see progress (charts
or graphs)
Awareness of their activity levels
Frustrations when the technology
did not accurately monitor or record
their activities
“It was neat keeping track of how
many steps you take in a day, I had
never done that. I thought it was
interesting and it regimented me.
(Benzo et al., 2018, p. 138)
“My cycling activities were not well
captured by the step counter.
(Loeckx et al., 2018, Appendix 8, p. 1)
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2. SUPPORTING MOTIVATION TO BE ACTIVE
Encouraged them to do more by
tracking their activity and getting
feedback and setting goals
Having someone else monitoring or
‘watching’ their physical activity
levels remotely (healthcare
professional or researcher)
motivated them.
“Wearing the pedometer was a
high motivator.
(Subject 02; Larson & Webster, 2020, p. 11)
“If you knew someone was watching you
from a distance, even if it was once a
fortnight, they would look and say or
send you emails and say ‘What
happened?’”
(Participant 10; Liacos et al., 2018, p. 377)
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3. ACCEPTABILITY OF THE DEVICE
Liked to use the technology
Not satisfied or did not like it
Overwhelming and daunting
“I was increasing my walking;… I
love using the pedometer.”
(Participant 12; Liacos et al., 2018, p. 376)
“My main complaint is about the
armbands and the Garmin.”
(Benzo et al., 2018, p. 137)
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CONCLUSION
Understanding of
experiences
Benefits to physical
and mental health
and wellbeing
Further high-quality
in-depth research is
needed
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THANK YOU!
Laura J Wilde
www.laurawilde.co.uk @laurawilde24wildel5@uni.coventry.ac.uk
And a big thank you to my supervision team Cain Clark, Carol Percy, Gillian Ward, and Louise Sewell
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