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Call for Abstracts: Session "Digitization and Infrastructuring of Qualitative Research - On the Debate about the Potentials and Risks of Archiving and Re- Using Qualitative Research Data" at the 2 nd International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Spatial Methods

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Call 4 Abstracts
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The Global Center of Spatial Methods for Urban Sustainability is funded by the
German Academic Exchange Service - DAAD with funds from the German Fed-
eral Ministry for Economic Cooperation (BMZ)
Call for Abstracts (Deadline: 13.06.2022)
Session “Digitization and Infrastructuring of Qualitative Research –
On the Debate about the Potentials and Risks of Archiving and Re-
Using Qualitative Research Data”
at the 2nd International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Spatial Methods for
Urban Sustainability (SMUS Conference) &
1st RC33 Regional Conference Latin America: Brazil, 0810.09.2022,
Online-Conference hosted by the University of São Paulo (Brazil)
Dear Colleagues,
We hereby invite you to submit an abstract for the Session “Digitization and Infrastructuring of
Qualitative Research – On the Debate about the Potentials and Risks of Archiving and Re-Using
Qualitative Research Data” at the at the “2nd International and Interdisciplinary Conference on
Spatial Methods for Urban Sustainability” (“SMUS Conference”), which will simultaneously be the
“1st RC33 Regional Conference Latin America: Brazil” and take place online at the University of
São Paulo (Brazil) from Thursday, September 8th, to Saturday, September 10th, 2022.
Session Organizers
René Wilke (Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, rene.wilke@tu-berlin.de)
Session Topic
Today, data is largely digital. This also applies to qualitative research. Interviews, for example,
are recorded as digital audio files and are no longer typed out with a typewriter but transformed
into digitized objects during transcription. Audio-visual data today, for another example, is
generally digital. Digital data can be digitally processed in many ways due to the intraactivity of
the technology. Software for qualitative research data facilitates the processing and analysis of
most data types. In addition to transcription, annotation, categorization and explication of research
data, the potential for sustainability of digital data has recently come to the foreground, also in the
field of qualitative research. Suitable research data or their digitized copies can now be shared
efficiently thanks to the currently accelerated development and expansion of infrastructures for
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archiving and re-using of research data, such as specialized (partly web-based) research data
centers (RDC). Against this background, a culture of data sharing is being promoted. In this
context, the potential of the new infrastructures is increasingly being emphasized foremost in
research policy and by funding agencies. The benefits for individual researchers (e.g., visibility
and support in research data management) as well as the entire research community (e.g.,
traceability and accumulation of reusable data corpora for research and teaching) are named
here. However, re-use, opening and sharing data as part of the research data management
(RDM), is more than a technical issue. Rather, ethical, methodological and research strategy
aspects play an important role in the evaluation of RDCs in the various communities of qualitative
research. The ethnographic research paradigm is crucial here, which has significantly influenced
the development of qualitative research methods and whose principles are diametrically opposed
to tailoring qualitative RDM to the standardization of quantitative research. With this in mind, the
risks of infrastructuring qualitative research are widely discussed in the research communities.
These include fears that the freedom of research could be restricted, and that qualitative research
could be influenced by non-scientific aspects (e.g., towards fields where sensitive data is not
collected), as well as the general methodological criticism of the reusability of qualitative research
data and the epistemological value of secondary analyses in qualitative research. Given that the
development and establishment of appropriate research data infrastructures in many countries is
now so far advanced that it is less a question of whether research data should be re-used in
qualitative research, but rather of how and under what conditions, we would like to take up and
continue the current debate with you. We welcome contributions that approach the question of
the potential and risks of archiving and re-using of qualitative research data from a
methodological, practical or science research perspective.
About the Conference
The “Global Center of Spatial Methods for Urban Sustainability” (GCSMUS or SMUS) together
with the Research Committee on “Logic and Methodology in Sociology” (RC33) of the “Interna-
tional Sociology Association” (ISA), and the Research Network “Quantitative Methods” (RN21) of
the “European Sociology Association” (ESA) will organize the 2nd International and Interdisci-
plinary Conference on Spatial Methods for Urban Sustainability (“SMUS Conference”),
which will simultaneously be the “1st RC33 Regional Conference Latin America: Brazil, and
take place online at the University of São Paulo (Brazil) from Thursday, September 8th, to
Saturday, September 10th, 2022. The three-day conference aims at continuing a global dialogue
on methods and should attract methodologists from all over the world and all social and spatial
sciences (e. g. anthropology, area studies, architecture, communication studies, computational
sciences, digital humanities, educational sciences, geography, historical sciences, humanities,
landscape planning, philosophy, psychology, sociology, urban design, urban planning, traffic
planning and environmental planning). The online conference programme will include keynotes,
sessions and advanced methodological training courses. With this intention, we invite scholars of
all social and spatial sciences and other scholars who are interested in methodological
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discussions to suggest an abstract to any sessions of the conference. All papers have to address
a methodological problem.
Please find more information on the SMUS Brazil 2022 Conference on:
https://gcsmus.org/conferences/brazil/
Information about the above institutions may be found on the following websites:
Global Center of Spatial Methods for Urban Sustainability (GCSMUS): https://gcsmus.org/
ISA RC33: http://rc33.org/
ESA RN21: www.europeansociology.org/research-networks/rn21-quantitative-methods
University of São Paulo: https://www5.usp.br
If you are interested in getting further information on the conference and other GCSMUS ac-
tivities, please subscribe to the SMUS newsletter by registering via the following website:
https://lists.tu-berlin.de/mailman/listinfo/mes-smusnews
Submission of Abstracts
If you are interested in presenting a paper at this session, please submit an English-language
abstract containing the following information to SMUS Brazil 2022 via
https://smusbrazil2022.sinteseeventos.com.br/ between 01.04.2022 and 13.06.2022:
Title of (at maximum two) preferred session(s)
Paper title
Author(s) (= name(s), gender(s), institutional affiliation(s), position(s), country(ies), email ad-
dress(es))
300- to 500-Word Abstract (= short description of the proposed paper. The abstract should
make explicit (i) the methodological problem addressed, (ii) why this is relevant, (iii) how the
paper relates to the session, and (iv) what the general line of argument will be.)
Please note that all sessions must adhere to the rules of session organization comprised in the
RC33 statutes and GCSMUS Objectives (see below). Please note that you can give a maximum
of two papers at the conference, including joint papers. The conference organizers will inform
you by 31.07.2022 whether the proposed paper has been accepted for presentation at the con-
ference. For further information please see the SMUS Brazil 2022 conference website or contact
the session organizers.
Please also kindly forward this call to anybody to whom it might be of interest.
Best wishes,
René Wilke
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Rules for Session Organization
(According to GCSMUS Objectives and RC 33 Statutes)
1. There will be no conference fees.
2. The conference language is English, although some of the activities are going to be simulta-
neously translated into Portuguese. All papers therefore need to be presented in English.
3. All sessions have to be international: Each session should have speakers from at least two
countries (exceptions will need good reasons).
4. Each paper must contain a methodological problem (any area, qualitative or quantitative).
5. There will be several calls for abstracts via the GCSMUS, RC33 and RN21 Newsletters. To
begin with, session organizers can prepare a call for abstracts on their own initiative, then at
a different time, there will be a common call for abstracts, and session organizers can ask
anybody to submit a paper.
6. GCSMUS, RC33 and RN21 members may distribute these calls via other channels. GCS-
MUS members and session organizers are expected to actively advertise their session in
their respective scientific communities.
7. Speakers can only have one talk per session. This also applies for joint papers. It will not be
possible for A and B to present at the same time one paper as B and A during the same
session. This would just extend the time allocated to these speakers.
8. Session organizers may present a paper in their own session.
9. Sessions will have a length of 90 minutes with a maximum of 4 papers or a length of 120
minutes with a maximum of 6 papers. Session organizers can invite as many speakers as
they like. The number of sessions depends on the number of papers submitted to each ses-
sion: for example, if 12 good papers are submitted to a session, there will be two sessions
with a length of 90 minutes each with 6 papers in each session.
10. Papers may only be rejected for the conference if they do not present a methodological prob-
lem (as stated above), are not in English or are somehow considered by session organizers
as not being appropriate or relevant for the conference. Session organizers may ask authors
to revise and resubmit their paper so that it fits these requirements. If session organizers do
not wish to consider a paper submitted to their session, they should inform the author and
forward the paper to the local organizing team who will find a session where the paper fits for
presentation.
11. Papers directly addressed to the conference organising committee, suggesting a session.
The conference organizers will check the formal rules and then offer the paper to the session
organizer of the most appropriate session. The session organizers will have to decide on
whether or not the paper can be included in their session(s). If the session organizers think
that the paper does not fit into their session(s), the papers has to be sent back to the confer-
ence organizing committee as soon as possible so that the committee can offer the papers
to another session organizer.
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