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Постсоветская и мировая модернизация: итоги тридцати лет

Authors:
  • Bruegel, National Research University Higher School of Economics, CASE - Center for Social and Economic Research
  • Shomron Center for economic Policy Research
Book

Постсоветская и мировая модернизация: итоги тридцати лет

Abstract

Оригинальная (не искаженная при сдаче в печать) версия книжки вышедшей в декабре 2021 года. 30 лет реформ в постсоветских странах. Где и насколько удалось приблизится к стабильному здоровому экономическому росту и к "благодетельному циклу" при котором "частные инвестиции при безопасности собственника и сохранности плодов его усилий повышают уровень жизни, создают стимул инвестировать в образование и лечение детей-наследников. Рост уровня образования и продолжительности жизни создает высокий спрос на научные исследования, приводит к дальнейшему прогрессу в экономике, соответственно в образовании и здравоохранении, и так далее"...
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