Thesis

Palerme, « ville accueillante » ? : instrumentalisation politique de l’accoglienza, formes d’hospitalité locale et effets sur les trajectoires des exilés

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Abstract

Cette thèse analyse l’action publique locale en matière d’accueil à Palerme (Sicile, Italie) par le prisme des trajectoires d’exilés entre 2017 et 2020. Elle analyse d’une part la manière dont l’accueil et l’expérience migratoire à Palerme ont permis d’alimenter un nouveau registre politique local autour du projet de « ville accueillante » et d’autre part la façon dont cette position de l’action publique urbaine a pu influencer et se retrouver dans les trajectoires des exilés rencontrés. Carrefours méditerranéens, et, depuis 2015, lieux principaux d’arrivée en Europe depuis le continent Africain, la Sicile et Palerme ont été témoins des dynamiques de contrôles et de guerres politiques en Méditerranée, reflétant le contexte international et européen tendu sur les questions migratoires. Durant cette période, les métropoles européennes se sont saisies de la crise politique afin de se positionner, vis-à-vis des États-Nations, et entre-elles. Pour de nombreuses municipalités, l’urgence sociale de l’hébergement et de l’accueil des exilés à la rue s’est transformée en une revendication politique : les questions du cosmopolitisme et du multiculturalisme ont été réinvesties et enrichies de nouvelles significations locales. Les réseaux de ville ont servi de support de circulation pour contester les modèles d’accueil et d’intégration nationaux. Dans ce contexte, entre particularismes locaux et circulation de modèles, l’expérience palermitaine de l’accueil raconte un néo municipalisme complexe et riche en contradictions. Il est analysé dans cette recherche en croisant histoire locale et expériences migratoires, urbaines et sociales de personnes exilées à Palerme

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