Article

The Economic Benefits of Human Performance Models in Systems Engineering

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Abstract

Human performance modeling (HPM) is a method of quantifying human behavior, cognition, physical performance, and processes used for the development of systems designed for optimal user experience and interaction (Seibok and Wickens, 2013). Human Performance Models (HPMs) are an effective tool for Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) (Steinberg et al, 2017), with high economic benefit. Human Engineering practitioners use HPMs to define crew design requirements including the number of operators needed, the benefits of automation, and distribution of member task responsibilities required to operate a system. The application of HPMs throughout the development process helps to influence the system design by integrating with MBSE processes and informing many aspects of system definition and development including performance trades of algorithms, hardware, command and control functions, automation, and the need for situation awareness to monitor the system. In addition to these design benefits, HPMs save development costs and for a described case study reduced costs $4.3M demonstrating the economic benefits for systems engineering. This paper will outline the HPM process for a Command and Control (C2) system.

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