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Abstract

The issue of project management methodologies has never be undertaken by academics in the context of their contribution to sustainability. There is the lack of understanding which Agile Project Management (APM) results and Agile value crea- tion methods are in line with the assumptions of sustainability. The article fills this gap and presents the linkage between Agile project management and sustainability. The article presents both theoretical considerations as well as the results of empirical research that explains the relationship between APM and sustainability. As a result of multiple surveys, Guttman scales were developed, which showed the degree of Agile aspects' influence on sustainability, taking into account both the results of Agile implementation and the methods of value creation. Research revealed that improving the timeliness of deliveries, increase in productivity and improving the atmosphere in the organization as APM result is significant for sustainability. Value creation methods that most correspond with sustainability are design thinking and Agile rituals. The above provide certain practical and theoretical implications.

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... Sustainability, a term that is increasingly used as "A thought for long-term goals", because it is a dynamic balance of three mutually interrelated elements: natural ecosystems, resource conservation and enhancement; economic production; and the provision of social infrastructure such as jobs, housing, education, medical care, and cultural opportunities (Bell & Morse, 2008;Sharifi & Sharbatdar, 2021). While Zakrzewska et al. (2022) define sustainability as a dynamic process that combines economic, social, institutional, and environmental dimensions, the concept of sustainability performance is more difficult to define due to its broad and subjective characteristics, especially with regard to its environmental dimension and the way in which this interacts with other economic and social dimensions. Thus, it is necessary to propose a common framework for measuring sustainability performance and sustainable practices that have positive impacts upon the industry (St Flour & Bokhoree, 2021). ...
... The environmental dimension is about the ability to use natural resources without undermining the equilibrium and integrity of ecosystems, and reduce the burden on the environment (Bell & Morse, 2008;Sami & Farid, 2021;Sharifi & Sharbatdar, 2021;St Flour & Bokhoree, 2021;Zakrzewska et al., 2022). The environmental dimension was ranked first in importance, with a weight of 39% across the five categories. ...
... The social dimension is about ensuring equality of opportunities for people, involving welfare, quality of life, and sustainable human development. It should liberate individual capacities and fulfill human needs, thus ending poverty and improving individual quality of life, offering security with full rights and liberties in the long term, and engendering social cohesion (Bell & Morse, 2008;Sami & Farid, 2021;Sharifi & Sharbatdar, 2021;St Flour & Bokhoree, 2021;Zakrzewska et al., 2022). The social dimension was ranked second in importance with a weight 24% across five categories. ...
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W artykule przedstawiono relacje między cechami kultury organizacyjnej a metodykami prowadzenia projektów. Podkreślono przy tym atrybuty tzw. kultury projektowej oraz dokonano ogólnej charakterystyki praktykowanych podejść do zarządzania projektami. Mając na uwadze typologię kultur według Camerona i Quinna stwierdzono, że postępowanie zgodne z wartościami kulturowymi charakterystycznymi dla kultury o typie klanu lub adhokracji gwarantują metodyki nowoczesne. W organizacjach o kulturze hierarchii lub rynku standardy zachowań i pozycja kierownika projektu odpowiada ujęciu prezentowanemu w tradycyjnych metodykach zarządzania projektami.
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Sustainability is the capacity to endure in ecological terms. A sustainable system is one that has a "stable" nontrivial "end" state. Monotonous change is an indication that the system is not sustainable. The Sun's energy powers the entire ecosystem on earth: water cycle and biomass cycle. The water cycle provides opportunity for hydroelectric power development. While both hydroelectricity and wind electricity are renewable and sustainable, hydroelectricity power plants have a more predictable load factor. The water storage reservoirs can have a stabilizing effect on the "local climate", improving biomass cycles. Biomass utilization brings a sustainable state change. Switching from fossil energy use to biomass use will see an increase in carbon dioxide emission into the atmosphere initially. However, there is a new sustainable state foreseeable with biomass use, in direct contrast to fossil energy use. Apart from the sustainability impact, the depletion of fossil sources has made it imperative to move away from its utilization. Wood or forest biomass has the highest saturation standing biomass, while algae have the highest production rate. High saturation biomass species are more advantageous than low saturation biomass species due to the collection and transportation restrictions. The lower standing biomass also leads to more CO 2 staying in the atmosphere. Depending on the life-span of the final product, the effect of biomass management on the carbon storage can be either positive or negative. Solar energy is vastly available and its use is less disturbing to the ecosystems. It is clear that in the direct solar energy utilization cycle; there is no water, carbon dioxide, or any other than substance emission involvement. Efficient capture of solar energy is the key for its sustainable exploitation. However, solar energy capture cannot interfere with plant biomass. Geothermal energy is most reliable as it is stored deep underneath the earth. It can be exploited from any point on the earth surface by deep drilling into the rocks. However, geothermal energy is neither sustainable nor renewable. Just because there is vast amount of geothermal energy is not the reason for us to exploit. It is a more desperate resource than anything else on earth.
Article
While sustainability management is becoming more widespread among major companies, the impact of their activities does not reflect in studies monitoring the state of the planet. What results from this is a “big disconnect.” With this article, we address two main questions: “How can business make an effective contribution to addressing the sustainability challenges we are facing?” and “When is business truly sustainable?” In a time when more and more corporations claim to manage sustainably, we need to distinguish between those companies that contribute effectively to sustainability and those that do not. We provide an answer by clarifying the meaning of business sustainability. We review established approaches and develop a typology of business sustainability with a focus on effective contributions for sustainable development. This typology ranges from Business Sustainability 1.0 (Refined Shareholder Value Management) to Business Sustainability 2.0 (Managing for the Triple Bottom Line) and to Business Sustainability 3.0 (True Sustainability).
Article
Coordination among project participants is an important function having considerable effect on the outcome of a construction project. Literature review and interviews of experts led to the identification of 59 construction coordination activities. Results of a questionnaire survey conducted among Indian construction professionals on these coordination activities recognized 20 important coordination activities essential for achieving day-to-day project coordination. A second level of questionnaire survey was then conducted using the 20 coordination activities. Analyses of responses on the 20 coordination activities found that only six activities are significant in enhancing coordination rating of the project. The analyses indicated that the extent of contribution of different coordination activities varies with the present coordination ratings of a given project. While estimation of the optimum resource requirements has the highest positive effect on achieving coordination at low coordination rating levels, the activity preparation of a project quality plan in line with contract specification is observed to contribute most when the coordination rating is already at high level. A model is also suggested that can evaluate the impact of these six coordination activities in achieving the coordination rating of a project.
Article
Sustainability is one of the most important challenges of our time. How can we develop prosperity, without compromising the life of future generations? Companies are integrating ideas of sustainability in their marketing, corporate communication, annual reports and in their actions. Projects play a pivotal role in the realisation of more sustainable business practices, and the concept of sustainability has more recently also been linked to project management. The emerging literature on this topic provides strong indications that considering sustainability impacts project management processes and practices. However, the standards for project management fail to address the sustainability agenda. This article provides a structured review of 164 publications, covering the time period 1993 - 2013, that relate sustainability to project management. The research questions answered are: 'How is sustainability defined or considered in the context of project management?' and, 'How does considering sustainability impact project management?' Based on an identification of relevant dimensions of sustainability that was evident from the publications, we identified the areas of impact of sustainability on project management. It appeared that considering sustainability impacts project management on different levels. Considering sustainability implies, firstly, a shift of scope in the management of projects: from managing time, budget and quality, to managing social, environmental, and economic impact. Secondly, it implies a shift of paradigm of project management: from an approach that can be characterised by predictability and controllability, to an approach that is characterised by flexibility, complexity and opportunity. And thirdly, considering sustainability implies a mind shift for the project manager: from delivering requested results, to taking responsibility for sustainable development in organisations and society. With these findings, the practices and standards of project management can be developed further to address the role projects play in creating sustainable development.
Sustainability assessment is a recent framing of impact assessment that places emphasis on delivering positive net sustainability gains now and into the future. It can be directed to any type of decision-making, can take many forms and is fundamentally pluralistic. Drawing mainly on theoretical papers along with the few case study examples published to date (from England, Western Australia, South Africa and Canada), this paper outlines what might be considered state-of-the-art sustainability assessment. Such processes must: (i) address sustainability imperatives with positive progress towards sustainability; (ii) establish a workable concept of sustainability in the context of individual decisions/assessments; (iii) adopt formal mechanisms for managing unavoidable trade-offs in an open, participative and accountable manner; (iv) embrace the pluralistic inevitabilities of sustainability assessment; and (v) engender learning throughout. We postulate that sustainability assessment may be at the beginning of a phase of expansion not seen since environmental impact assessment was adopted worldwide.
Article
This article speculates beyond current thinking in project management, asserting that traditional project management cannot fulfill the challenges and requirements for mastering increased complexity in society, economics, and technology. The new paradigmatic evolutionary-systemic and cybernetic-systemic research results (including self-organization or chaotic systems) in the more recent natural and social sciences were analyzed based on their relevance for a new perspective in project management. Selected results of the research program will be presented, including a short description of “Project Management Second Order (PM-2)” as a highlighted result and a new paradigm in project management.
Article
This study operationalizes corporate sustainable development and examines its organizational determinants. Data for this project pertain to Canadian firms in the oil and gas, mining, and forestry industries from 1986 to 1995. I find that both resource-based and institutional factors influence corporate sustainable development. By exploring time-related effects, I also find that media pressures were important in early periods and resource-based opportunities endured over time. This finding challenges the assumption that firms first adopt innovations in response to technical rewards which are later institutionalized. These counter-intuitive results may be attributable to the unique characteristics of the dependent variable, corporate sustainable development. They raise important questions and directions for future research. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
This paper presents findings from an exploratory study that investigated how 36 companies operating in three industry sectors in Aus-tralia define and measure Information Technology (IT) project success. Our study suggests that when success criteria are formally defined and then measured, IT project outcomes are improved and project resources are better utilized. In addition, those companies with the most effective methods for defining and measuring IT project success shared some important common practices. Based on these findings, this paper provides insights for defining (and improving) project success in complex environments and presents a model of effective practices.
Article
The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to position sustainable entrepreneurship in relation to sustainability innovation. The framework builds on a typology of sustainable entrepreneurship, develops it by including social and institutional entrepreneurship, i.e. the application of the entrepreneurial approach towards meeting societal goals and towards changing market contexts, and relates it to sustainability innovation. The framework provides a reference for managers to introduce sustainability innovation and to pursue sustainable entrepreneurship. Methodologically, the paper develops an approach of qualitative measurement of sustainable entrepreneurship and how to assess the position of a company in a classification matrix. The degree of environmental or social responsibility orientation in the company is assessed on the basis of environmental and social goals and policies, the organization of environmental and social management in the company and the communication of environmental and social issues. The market impact of the company is measured on the basis of market share, sales growth and reactions of competitors. The paper finds conditions under which sustainable entrepreneurship and sustainability innovation emerge spontaneously. The research has implications for theory and practitioners in that it clarifies which firms are most likely under specific conditions to make moves towards sustainability innovation. The paper makes a contribution in showing that extant research needs to be expanded with regard to motivations for innovation and that earlier models of sustainable entrepreneurship need to be refined. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.
Article
The relevance of environmental activities has increased both in research and practice. Yet, there is only little systematic insight into such activities of firms, particularly regarding human resource management aspects. This study improves the empirical knowledge for the manufacturing sector, by exploring the incidence of environmental activities and by analysing the determinants of their use, particularly in terms of the incidence of environmental training activities for employees. Besides this, consequences of the incidence are analysed in terms of benefits for job satisfaction and employee retention/recruitment.
Article
Summary Global projects affect and are affected by multiple stakeholders with differing interests and demands. Recently, there has been increased pressure for global projects to be more environmentally and socially responsible. A project creates a dynamic context for stakeholder management and stakeholder behavior because the project moves through different phases during its lifecycle. By adopting a lifecycle perspective on secondary stakeholders' behavior, we develop a set of propositions that increase our understanding of the potential of secondary stakeholders to influence the project management's decision making during the different phases of the project lifecycle. Ultimately, a better understanding of secondary stakeholders' influence behavior during the project lifecycle enables the use of more effective project stakeholder management approaches.
Article
Business sustainability entails the incorporation of the objectives of sustainable development, namely social equity, economic efficiency and environmental performance, into a company's operational practices. Companies that compete globally are increasingly required to commit to and report on the overall sustainability performances of operational initiatives. The current indicator frameworks that are available to measure overall business sustainability do not effectively address all aspects of sustainability at operational level, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. Social criteria, specifically, do not receive due considerations. This article proposes a new framework to assess the sustainability of operations in the manufacturing sector.