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Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Potential of Crassula ovata

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Abstract

This study investigates the antimicrobial properties of Crassula ovata (C. ovata) against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. About 1-3g samples of C. Ovata leaf samples were extracted with 95 % ethanol and the extract infused into paper discs by soaking and drying. The dried discs were screened against various strains of bacteria and the antimicrobial effects of the infused agents determined by measuring zones of inhibition due to the agents infused into the discs. By the zones of inhibition, C. ovata showed antimicrobial activity against the following gram-negative bacteria: E. coli (14 mm mean zone of clearing), P. vulgaris (13 mm mean zone of clearing), E. cloacae (16 mm mean zone of clearing), and K. pneumoniae (13 mm mean zone of clearing). C. ovata showed antimicrobial activity against the following gram-positive bacteria: S. aureus (22 mm mean zone of clearing) and S. agalactiae (8 mm mean zone of clearing). C. ovata did not show antimicrobial activity against S. pyogenes. By its antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, C. ovata displayed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, S. agalactiae, P. vulgaris, E. cloacae, and K. pneumoniae. C. ovata may have the potential to serve as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial in the future. Further testing should be done to investigate the toxicities and side effects of C. ovata. Further testing must also be done with C. ovata against drug-resistant strains of bacteria.

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... 2. Method 2.1 Sample extraction and disc preparation 2g samples of Taraxacum officinale were homogenized and suspended in 95% ethanol [15] . The filtrate from the homogenate ethanol mixture was infused into sterile discs as previously described [15] . ...
... 2. Method 2.1 Sample extraction and disc preparation 2g samples of Taraxacum officinale were homogenized and suspended in 95% ethanol [15] . The filtrate from the homogenate ethanol mixture was infused into sterile discs as previously described [15] . The 95% vehicle control was also infused into a blank disc to control for vehicle effect. ...
... The 95% vehicle control was also infused into a blank disc to control for vehicle effect. Glycerol stocks of bacteria were scaled and agar plates prepared as described earlier [15] . A 100 microliter suspension of the scaled bacteria was diluted with 9 ml of 1% saline solution and 100 ul of this dilution was plated [15] . ...
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