BookPDF Available

New Industrial Urbanism: Designing Places for Production

Authors:
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigates the environmental transformation of Chattanooga, a city imbued with environmental paradoxes, in the context of turning points and trajectories. The research analyses events beginning the industrial prominence of Chattanooga in the post-World War era, environmental decay in the late 1960s and early 1970s, to the present day ‘green’ economy. Twenty five key informants were interviewed one-onone. Data was corroborated with review of documents and archival records, and field observations. Findings show distinct trajectories and turning points in the city's environmental history, backed by key decisions that helped transform reliance on heavy manufacturing to environmentally cleaner industries and a thriving service industry. The study captures urban resilience and the power of citizen visioning and community engagement. Lessons could be used to inform United States' rustbelt cities that have the same natural endowments and are still struggling to revitalize themselves socioeconomically.
Chapter
Full-text available
The city of Medellín, Colombia has undergone drastic changes in recent decades. Known as “the most dangerous city in the world” in the 1990s, Medellín was nominated “the most innovative city in the world” in 2013. Due to this changed image, the city managed to attract foreign investors, international companies and tourists from all over the world. The city has even become a model for social progress. This positioning of the city image has been achieved thanks to the technological, social, cultural and educational projects and programs that have been proposed in the local development plans. All this change, of course, could only happen with public policies and social programs that have managed to affect the inhabitants of the city through a process of citizen participation. This chapter analyzes the development plans and management reports of Medellín between 2004 and 2019, using qualitative content analysis, to identify the city’s paradiplomacy and city branding strategies.
Article
Full-text available
Problem, research strategy, and findings: In recent years, several major cities have implemented industrial preservation policies to attract and retain industrial uses after facing acute pressures to rezone often centrally located industrial land to “higher and better” uses. Minimal research to date, however, has examined how effective industrial preservation policies have been at protecting and promoting urban industrial activity. In this study, we ask how New York City’s (NY) Industrial Business Zone (IBZ) program affected four measures of urban industrial activity—industrial business registrations, industrial employment, industrial building permits, and industrial land—in IBZs in New York City. We benchmark our results against a comparison group established using propensity score matching. We find that the IBZ program had a significant impact on retaining industrial land in IBZs but that it did not have a significant impact on promoting new industrial business registrations, employment, or building permits in IBZs. Takeaway for practice: Our research provides evidence of how various measures of urban industrial activity change following the designation of an industrial preservation policy. This research suggests that industrial preservation policies can be an effective tool to stem urban industrial land losses in cities facing land use conversion pressures, but that such policies need to create more robust linkages with economic development planning objectives. In the interest of continuing to protect middle-class industrial job opportunities in central cities, planners and practitioners should consider how to strengthen ties between physical land use planning and economic development planning.
Article
Smart city initiatives in Latin America aim to harness information and communication technologies to make urban service provision and management more efficient, transparent and user-friendly. Latin American cities have been relatively slow to adopt such initiatives, but there is inter- and intra-urban variety in the region. We offer illustrative vignettes of Rio de Janeiro, Santiago and Medellín, which have experimented with different formats for smart city programme design, implementation and management. While top-down and flashier smart city projects in these cities reflect worlding aspirations on the part of urban elites, mixed and bottom-up approaches serve to provincialise and often informalise the initiatives in manners that destabilise elitism and more equitably distribute costs and benefits. One of the biggest challenges these cities share in developing smarter initiatives is inequality, given that most interventions are located in or benefit higher-income areas and actors. As instruments to provincialise the discourses and practices of smart cityness in the region, we propose that cities adopt the ‘6-Es smart cities framework’ (efficiency, economy, ecology, equity, education and engagement) and mobilise public–private– people partnerships within city plans and implementation processes.
Article
This article discusses the contribution of innovation centres in nearby neighbourhoods based on primary data. This paper involves the study of the case of Ruta N in Medell ın to expose the relationship between a consolidated neighbourhood and new innovation facilities. Ruta N was founded after the implementation of a city-level policy for innovation intended to secure the economic growth of a former deprived area of the city. This innovation attracted local and international creative entrepreneurs to Medell ın's downtown but with inconsistent results. The analysis revealed that Ruta N rarely interacts with the nearby neighbourhood, thus restricting its potential to contribute to the community. Instead, it is perceived that Ruta N takes advantage of the neighbourhood to meet the needs of Ruta N users, not the other way around. As a result, community members argue that Ruta N could promote potential conflicts in the area.
Article
This paper considers the cases of urban redevelopment at waterfront and brownfield sites in Copenhagen (Denmark) and Hamburg (Germany) to explore how two municipal governments have pursued divergent kinds of entrepreneurial governance, even as they have aimed to create similar kinds of new-build neighbourhoods. Copenhagen and Hamburg have both engaged in large-scale speculative development projects, simultaneously raising urban land values and adding urban public good. The cities follow a long tradition of using land value capture to raise funds for municipal activities , yet their scopes of action and tools for achieving progress have been shaped by local economic and political conditions. Although both cities began redevelopment at similar kinds of sites in the 1990s, Copenhagen's municipal government was relatively impoverished, while Hamburg's municipal government was relatively wealthy. As a result, even though both cities deployed state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and revolving funds models to reinvest revenues in future development, they possessed different potential strategies for increasing intercity competitiveness: Copenhagen's immediate aim in redeveloping its Ørestad and harbour districts was to fund a citywide mass transit system and thereby enhance competitiveness through infrastructure development, while Hamburg sought to use its HafenCity waterfront redevelopment to boost competitiveness through port mod-ernisation, increased in urban quality and commercial expansion in the city centre. By comparing these two cases, we can better understand the contingent nature of entrepreneurial governance and urban redevelopment processes.
Article
This thesis examines how the mission-oriented corporation, an emerging type of public-private partnership, delivers historic preservation outcomes in coordination with other urban management goals. It presents a study of four redeveloped sites within the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York: Building 92, the Naval Cemetery Landscape, the Building 128 Complex (also called the “Green Manufacturing Center”), and Admirals Row Plaza. The redevelopment strategies implemented at the Brooklyn Navy Yard form a model for exploring the synergies between the conservation of heritage assets and broad urban planning, management, and regeneration policies. Though its projects have achieved varying degrees of success, the Brooklyn Navy Yard has found a relative equilibrium between retaining its integrity as a 300+ acre historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places and its organizational commitment to job creation, industrial growth, and community engagement.