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O tym, co kodować i jak kodować w badaniach narracyjnych

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P> Die These von einer Achsenzeit in der Weltgeschichte Die zentrale Annahme dieses Buches ist die universalgeschichtliche These von einer Achsenzeit (880–200 v. Chr.) in der Weltgeschichte, in der voneinander unabhängig in China, Indien und dem Abendland strukturell ähnliche kulturelle Revolutionen und Aufbrüche erfolgt sind. Inwieweit diese Aufbrüche für das kulturelle Leben in der Gegenwart weiterhin bedeutsam sind, wird heute in kulturwissenschaftlichen Disziplinen wie der Religions- und Kultursoziologie, der vergleichenden Kulturtheorie, der Theorie der Moderne u.a. neu diskutiert. Neben der These von der Achsenzeit wird in Vom Ursprung und Ziel der Geschichte u.a. der Stellenwert von Wissenschaft und Technik in der Moderne erörtert; es werden Überlegungen über eine mögliche Welteinheit (im Sinne eines Weltfriedenszustandes) angestellt sowie zeitgeschichtliche Tendenzen in der Politik (z.B. Totalitäts- und Planungsideologien) kritisiert, die im Gegensatz zu Jaspers’ liberalem Ethos der Freiheit und der Humanität stehen.</P
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The author addresses the field of infant mental health. He draws on his experience - in both the lab and the clinic - to present an integrated model of treatment for both infants and their parents.
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In conclusion, it should be stated that every reader is influenced by the spheres of the author, narrator and text. One of the most important kinds of influence are literary characters. An insightful, comprehensive and exhaustive re-creation of the character in telling the story makes the reader discover at some point its presence in his consciousness. It becomes a living character and leads an intense dialogue with the reader, affecting his behavior, way of thinking and acting. In order to influence the reader through a literary character, the author or narrator has several available models: a key figure for the narrative motif; a character who changes in the course of the story, a character having a unique specificity or, finally, a character strongly influencing other forms of narrative as a protagonist or antagonist. Great literary characters, created by authors writing with inspiration, and particularly by authors who are inspired by the Spirit of God, fulfill their goal (they implement a narrative strategy) that the author or narrator has set for himself and the reader. They shape the ideal reader not only in the first generation of recipients of the literary work, but for future centuries, despite changing circumstances, cultural conditions and their living environment. On the other hand, the reader, while opening himself up to the influence of the literary form, has the chance to benefit twice from the act of reading. First, he can go deeper into the world of storytelling to better understand the complexity of the existential problem (most often over time) and the whole series of actions needed to solve the problem. Second, we can better understand ourselves, the meaning of our life, the struggles we are undertaking, our experiences or better accept our joy, which flows from avoiding threats and destructive factors that appear in negative characters that are morally and spiritually evil. © 2018 Biblica et Patristica Thoruniensia. All rights reserved.
Article
Clinical and basic personality psychologists interact less than they should, given their similar interests. In clinical personality psychology, available evidence supports a transition from the current categorical system to a hierarchical trait scheme for diagnosing the stable features of personality disorder. However, trait models do not capture the dynamic aspects of personality disorders as they have been described in the clinical literature, and thus miss a clinically critical feature of personality pathology. In contrast, basic personality psychologists have coalesced around a consensual structure of individual differences and become increasingly interested in the dynamic processes that underlie and contextualize traits. But trait psychology models are not sufficiently specific to characterize dynamic personality processes. In this paper, I filter clinical descriptions of personality disorders through the lens of interpersonal theory to specify a recursive within‐situation interpersonal pattern of motives, affects, behaviours, and perceptions that could contribute to the stable between‐situation patterns of maladaptive behaviour of historical interest to both basic and clinical personality psychologists. I suggest that this interpersonal model adds specificity to recent proposals regarding processes in the basic personality literature and has significant potential to advance research on personality dynamics. © 2018 European Association of Personality Psychology
Article
The study’s goals were twofold: (a) to examine the effectiveness of narrating an angry experience, compared with relying on distraction or mere reexposure to the experience, for anger reduction across childhood and adolescence, and (b) to identify the features of narratives that are associated with more and less anger reduction for younger and older youths and for boys and girls. Participants were 241 youths (117 boys) between the ages of 8 and 17. When compared with mere reexposure, narration was effective at reducing youth’s anger both concurrently and in lasting ways; though narration was less effective than distraction at concurrently reducing anger, its effect was longer lasting. Contrary to expectation, there were no overall age differences in the relative effectiveness of narration for anger reduction; however, the analyses of the quality of youth’s narratives and of the relations between various narrative features and reductions in anger indicated that narration works to reduce distress among youth via processes that are distinct from those postulated for adults. Altogether, this study’s findings lend strong support to the potential of narration for helping youth across a broad age range manage anger experiences in ways that can reduce distress.
Article
Background. Co-research with people with intellectual disability (ID) is a distinct form of patient and public involvement (PPI). This systematic review summarises published studies and protocols to report on the process of co-research in social and health care research. Method. Relevant studies were identified using electronic searches on ASSIA, PsycInfo and MedLine. Study quality was assessed and information relevant to the process of working with co-researchers was extracted and thematically analysed. Results. Thirteen studies were retrieved. Data are reported under three themes: 1) challenges of co-research; 2) facilitators of co-research; 3) benefits of co-research. Best practice is presented as a model of co-research. Content analysis on 12 research protocols identified four themes related to PPI. Conclusions. All stakeholders involved in co-research with people with ID can benefit, providing there is adequate infrastructure to accommodate and empower the co-researchers. Many current ID research projects still lack systematic involvement of PPI members.
Article
In this article, we investigate methodological and theoretical constraints implicated by findings of low correlations between researcher codings and participant ratings of conceptually similar narrative features. We discuss potential explanations for these puzzling mismatches from a measurement perspective and from theoretical perspectives drawn from personality, developmental, and cognitive literatures. The mismatches raise questions for traditional theoretical assumptions of narrative identity as being internalized and subjective and may reflect different narrative constructs created through two different social contexts.
Chapter
This entry reviews the recent turn to narrative in the social and life sciences as having evolved from a widely shared interest and hope to find new answers to longstanding questions of lived experience, subjectivity, identity, and sense of self. The review enters narrative and storytelling from two ends: The first places narrative in the context of theories that approach it as an authoritative text that was borrowed and expanded to cover the general domain of how to live a meaningful life and to make sense of self–other relationships. The second starts off from narrating and storytelling practices in everyday, mundane communicative interactions, and highlights the interactive functions of storytelling as crucial for doing relational identity work. Both general orientations are reviewed in terms of their potential and shortcomings with regard to the original goal of an innovative contribution to human sense-making and identity work.