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ÖZEL EĞİTİM SINIFI ÖĞRENCİLERİNE FLOOR CURLING OYUNUNUN ÖĞRETİMİNDE EŞZAMANLI İPUCUYLA ÖĞRETİM YÖNTEMİNİN ETKİLİLİĞİ

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Abstract

The aim of this research was to examine the effectiveness of the simultaneous prompting method on teaching Floor Curling to special education class students with mild intellectual disability. In order to reach the aim of the research, a multiple probe model with intersubject probe phase, which is one of the single-subject research methods, was used. The research was carried out with 9 normally developing students accompanying 2 male and 1 female students who were selected in accordance with the characteristics of the study and were affected by intellectual disability, who were studying at Şehit Necdet Orhan Regional Boarding Secondary School in Bartın. In this research, the dependent variable was the ability to play Floor Curling. The independent variable was the simultaneous prompting on teaching the skill of playing Floor Curling. Collective probe, daily probe, teaching, maintaining and generalization sessions were planned to examine the effectiveness of simultaneous prompting on teaching floor curling skills to students with intellectual disability and to normally developing students. In all sessions, one-on-one instruction was given to the students. In the study, application reliability and inter-observer reliability data were collected. The findings of the research indicated that simultaneous prompting was effective on teaching Floor Curling skill and all normally developing students participated as observational learner in the teaching process and all students with intellectual disability learned the skill of playing Floor Curling with simultaneous prompting. In addition, it was concluded that the students were able to generalize their skills of playing Floor Curling to different environments and practitioners. As a result of the analysis, it was determined that the skill of playing Floor Curling maintained its permanence on the first, third and fifth weeks after the end of the education.
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