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Comparative Analysis of the State of Religious Pluralism between Intertestamental Palestine and Post-Apartheid South Africa

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Religious pluralism has characterized societies since time immemorial and has been one of the sources of conflict in many societies. This article compares how religious pluralism was handled in intertestamental Palestine and the manner it is managed in post-apartheid South Africa. The study used academic literature which applied the Apocrypha to describe the religious context of Palestine between 336 BC and 63 BC. The themes that emerged from this analysis were then used to source academic literature that describes the religious context of South Africa from 1994 to 2021. This process led to the synthesis of the similarities and differences of the two contexts. The findings latently reveal the contribution of the Apocrypha to theological reflection while simultaneously showing that the Roman Empire’s violent attempts to undermine religious pluralism in intertestamental Palestine bred counterviolence. The paper further reveals that post-apartheid South Africa’s use of legal instruments to promote religious pluralism seems to contribute to the optimization of religious freedom and peaceful co-existence. These findings are likely to contribute to the discourse of religious pluralism, interfaith dialogue, and intercultural communication.
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... The studies on interfaith relations/dialogue are mainly carried out by researchers related to the issue of religious pluralism (Huang, 1995;Lindsay, 2018;Nkuna, 2021;Owusu-Ansah & Akyeampong, 2019;Rambe, 2020;Susanta & Upa, 2021). Studies that specifically discuss interfaith relations related to pilgrimage describe social reflection from the perspective of Christianity (Boyd, 2016;Kalliath, 2007;L. ...
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