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Üretim Süreçleri ve Atık Bakımından Ayakkabı Sektörünün Çevreye Etkisi ve Geri Dönüşüm Uygulamaları

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Shoes are a product of everyday use that everyone in the world owns; there are more than 20 billion pairs of shoes manufactured each year. However, too much of anything isn’t good as there are many environmental impacts of shoe industry that cannot be ignored much longer. Shoe manufacturing and shoes in general poses many threats to the wellbeing of our planet as many toxins, chemicals and fossil fuels are produced and leaked into the environment during the first and last steps in the shoe life cycle (refer to the video on the homepage for more information on the shoe life cycle). These chemicals are harming both the wildlife and humans that come in contact with them, which, in turn, causes many health problems. Also, shoe manufacturing produces large amounts of carbon dioxide which contributes to the already serious effects of climate change and global warming.
Article
In 1990 the UK Government introduced a ‘challenging target of recycling 50% of household waste by the end of the century’. However, the success of local authority recycling programmes is reliant upon the participation of residents in the services provided. Traditional approaches (including leaflet drops and newspaper adverts) to communicating local authority services to the public have generally provided long-term educational benefits without offering the necessary short-term gains required to achieve the UK recycling target. In an attempt to increase low public awareness and participation the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea decided that effective promotion, through a door-to-door communications strategy, was the only means available to increase recycling tonnage and public participation in their doorstep recycling service. The Recycling Roadshow was launched to bring the recycling service and its message of ‘reduce, re-use, recycle’ to every doorstep in the borough. This awareness campaign has increased average weekly recycling tonnage from 107 to 132 tonnes, and this success is attributed to greater participation resulting from the promotional activities of the Roadshow and more effective participation with residents recycling a greater range of their household materials. Clearly the Roadshow is a useful additional marketing tool, which conceptually marks a major rethink in the way that recycling is perceived, placing recycling at the heart of an integrated waste management strategy. The research suggests that this style of communication can form a central and cost-effective approach to raising public participation, and supportive data will be presented in this paper. The details of the programme, the Borough’s decisions prior to and during the implementation of this programme, its impact and long-term success will be analysed in more detail within this paper.
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The European Union Landfill Directive calls on member states to reduce the amount of biodegradable municipal solid waste disposed of to landfill. In addition, national waste strategies will require the constituent parts of the United Kingdom to achieve increased household waste recycling and recovery rates. Both these measures will require the development of the infrastructure to support national high-intensity recycling and composting schemes and the construction of at least 35 new municipal waste to energy incinerators. Before plans can be developed for meeting the targets several areas relating to municipal solid waste need to be clarified. Depending on the definition of municipal solid waste, its composition and likely future growth rates the number of incinerators required could be up to 170.
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Global environmental regulations are changing the leather-processing industry. Pre-tanning and tanning processes contribute 80-90% of the total pollution in the industry and generate noxious gases, such as hydrogen sulfide, as well as solid wastes, such as lime and chrome sludge. The use of enzyme-based products is currently being explored for many areas of leather making. Furthermore, enzymes are gaining increasing importance in the de-hairing process, eliminating the need for sodium sulfide. This review discusses emerging novel biotechnological methods used in leather processing. One significant achievement is the development of a bioprocess-based de-hairing and fiber-opening methodology to reduce toxic waste.
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/32/ec of 18 March 2002 on establishing revised ecological criteria for the award of the community eco-label to footwear and amending Decision 1999/179/EC
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Sustaining Tanning Process through Conservation Recovery and Better (PDF) End of Lifemanagement of shoes and the role of biogederble materials
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SREERAM, K.and RAMASAMI,T.(2003). Sustaining Tanning Process through Conservation Recovery and Better (PDF) End of Lifemanagement of shoes and the role of biogederble materials. https://www.researchgate.net/publicition/229015996 (Erişim Tarihi:23.03.2021).
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