Technical ReportPDF Available

Abstract

The objective of Working Group (WG) 4 of the COST Action NET4Age-Friendly is to examine existing policies, advocacy, and funding opportunities and to build up relations with policy makers and funding organisations. Also, to synthesize and improve existing knowledge and models to develop from effective business and evaluation models, as well as to guarantee quality and education, proper dissemination and ensure the future of the Action. The Working Group further aims to enable capacity building to improve interdisciplinary participation, to promote knowledge exchange and to foster a cross-European interdisciplinary research capacity, to improve cooperation and co-creation with cross-sectors stakeholders and to introduce and educate students SHAFE implementation and sustainability (CB01, CB03, CB04, CB05). To enable the achievement of the objectives of Working Group 4, the Leader of the Working Group, the Chair and Vice-Chair, in close cooperation with the Science Communication Coordinator, developed a template (see annex 1) to map the current state of SHAFE policies, funding opportunities and networking in the COST member countries of the Action. On invitation, the Working Group lead received contributions from 37 countries, in a total of 85 Action members. The contributions provide an overview of the diversity of SHAFE policies and opportunities in Europe and beyond. These were not edited or revised and are a result of the main areas of expertise and knowledge of the contributors; thus, gaps in areas or content are possible and these shall be further explored in the following works and reports of this WG. But this preliminary mapping is of huge importance to proceed with the WG activities. In the following chapters, an introduction on the need of SHAFE policies is presented, followed by a summary of the main approaches to be pursued for the next period of work. The deliverable finishes with the opportunities of capacity building, networking and funding that will be relevant to undertake within the frame of Working Group 4 and the total COST Action. The total of country contributions is presented in the annex of this deliverable.
International Interdisciplinary Network on
Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments | NET4Age-Friendly
COST Action 19136 (2020-2024)
D4 Report on SHAFE policies, strategies and
funding
D4 Report on SHAFE policies, strategies and funding
Final I November 2021 I NET4Age-Friendly ©
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Authors
Name and surname
Email
Willeke van Staalduinen
willeke@afedemy.eu
Luiza Spiru
lsaslan@brainaging.ro
Maddalena Illario
illario@unina.it
Carina Dantas
carinadantas@shine2.eu
Cosmina Paul
cosmina.paul@anaaslanacademy.ro
Reviewers
Name and surname
Email
Fabio Naselli
fnaselli@epoka.edu.al
Florina Coman
Florina.coman@anaaslanacademy.ro
History
Version
Date
Action
Contributor
0.1
28.05.2021
First complete draft and sent to WG4
Willeke van Staalduinen
0.2
28.05.2021
Template included
Willeke van Staalduinen
0.3
27.09.2021
Framing and conclusions
Willeke van Staalduinen
0.4
30.09.2021
Draft final version concluded
Carina Dantas
0.5
20.11.2021
Multiple updates and revisions of
country reports
Willeke van Staalduinen,
Cosmina Paul, Luiza
Spiru, Maddalena Illario
1.0
09.12.2021
Final revision and formatting
Willeke van Staalduinen
and Carina Dantas
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The objective of Working Group (WG) 4 of the COST Action NET4Age-Friendly is to examine existing
policies, advocacy, and funding opportunities and to build up relations with policy makers and funding
organisations. Also, to synthesize and improve existing knowledge and models to develop from effective
business and evaluation models, as well as to guarantee quality and education, proper dissemination and
ensure the future of the Action. The Working Group further aims to enable capacity building to improve
interdisciplinary participation, to promote knowledge exchange and to foster a cross-European
interdisciplinary research capacity, to improve cooperation and co-creation with cross-sectors
stakeholders and to introduce and educate students SHAFE implementation and sustainability (CB01,
CB03, CB04, CB05).
To enable the achievement of the objectives of Working Group 4, the Leader of the Working Group, the
Chair and Vice-Chair, in close cooperation with the Science Communication Coordinator, developed a
template (see annex 1) to map the current state of SHAFE policies, funding opportunities and networking
in the COST member countries of the Action. On invitation, the Working Group lead received
contributions from 37 countries, in a total of 85 Action members. The contributions provide an overview
of the diversity of SHAFE policies and opportunities in Europe and beyond. These were not edited or
revised and are a result of the main areas of expertise and knowledge of the contributors; thus, gaps in
areas or content are possible and these shall be further explored in the following works and reports of
this WG. But this preliminary mapping is of huge importance to proceed with the WG activities.
In the following chapters, an introduction on the need of SHAFE policies is presented, followed by a
summary of the main approaches to be pursued for the next period of work. The deliverable finishes with
the opportunities of capacity building, networking and funding that will be relevant to undertake within
the frame of Working Group 4 and the total COST Action. The total of country contributions is presented
in the annex of this deliverable.
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Table of Contents
List of contributors ..................................................................................................................................... 6
1. Introduction | Why SHAFE is needed ............................................................................................. 7
1.1 SHAFE origin and objectives ....................................................................................................... 7
1.2 Working on the realisation of SHAFE .......................................................................................... 8
1.3 SHAFE mid-term goals .............................................................................................................. 10
1.3.1 Housing / Built Environments ........................................................................................... 11
1.3.2 Social Participation ........................................................................................................... 12
1.3.3 Communication and Information...................................................................................... 12
1.3.4 Health and Community Services ....................................................................................... 13
1.3.5 Further integration of citizen-centred care ...................................................................... 13
1.4 United Nations Sustainability Development Goals ................................................................... 13
1.5 EU policy on SHAFE ................................................................................................................... 14
2. Mapping SHAFE ............................................................................................................................ 16
2.1 Mapping SHAFE policies per country/region ............................................................................ 16
2.2 Mapping relevant stakeholders and policy makers .................................................................. 16
2.3 Mapping partners’ ecosystems interesting for NET4 ................................................................ 17
2.4 Mapping funding opportunities interesting for NET4 consortium ............................................ 18
2.5 Mapping relevant business models and sustainability means .................................................. 18
2.6 Facilitators, the Learning Repository and the Exploitation Booster Mechanisms ..................... 18
3. Conclusions and further actions ................................................................................................... 20
4. ANNEXES....................................................................................................................................... 21
4.1 ANNEX 1 Template country inventory ................................................................................... 21
4.2 ANNEX 2 Country contributions ............................................................................................. 22
1. Albania.......................................................................................................................................... 22
2. Austria .......................................................................................................................................... 23
3. Belgium ......................................................................................................................................... 25
4. Belarus .......................................................................................................................................... 28
5. Bosnia and Herzegovina ............................................................................................................... 29
6. Bulgaria......................................................................................................................................... 37
7. Croatia .......................................................................................................................................... 41
8. Cyprus ........................................................................................................................................... 44
9. Czech Republic .............................................................................................................................. 46
10. Denmark ....................................................................................................................................... 47
11. Estonia .......................................................................................................................................... 49
12. Finland .......................................................................................................................................... 50
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13. Germany ....................................................................................................................................... 57
14. Hungary ........................................................................................................................................ 59
15. Iceland .......................................................................................................................................... 64
16. Ireland .......................................................................................................................................... 71
17. Italy ............................................................................................................................................... 76
18. Japan ............................................................................................................................................ 78
19. Kosovo .......................................................................................................................................... 82
20. Latvia ............................................................................................................................................ 84
21. Lithuania ....................................................................................................................................... 86
22. Moldova ....................................................................................................................................... 87
23. Montenegro ................................................................................................................................. 92
24. Netherlands .................................................................................................................................. 94
25. North Macedonia ......................................................................................................................... 97
26. Norway ......................................................................................................................................... 98
27. Poland......................................................................................................................................... 101
28. Portugal ...................................................................................................................................... 104
29. Romania ..................................................................................................................................... 114
30. Serbia.......................................................................................................................................... 118
31. Slovenia ...................................................................................................................................... 123
32. Spain ........................................................................................................................................... 126
33. Sweden ....................................................................................................................................... 133
34. Switzerland ................................................................................................................................. 134
35. Tunisia ........................................................................................................................................ 136
36. Turkey ......................................................................................................................................... 137
37. United Kingdom .......................................................................................................................... 137
4.3 ANNEX 3 - Points of focus and positions ................................................................................. 140
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List of contributors
Agnieszka Cieśla, PL
Alexander Seifert, CH
Alexandre Chikalanow, BG
Amine Haj Taieb, TU
Ana Perandrés, PT
Andjela Jakšić Stojanović, ME
Andrea Ferenczi, HU
Andrej Grgurić, HR
Andrzej Klimczuk, PL
Anne Moen, NO
Areti Efthymiou, CY
Arianna Poli, SE
Aurelija Blaževičienė, LT
Avni Rexhepi, XK
Begonya Garcia-Zapirain, ES
Berrin Benli, TR
Bettina Huesbø, NO
Damon Berry, IE
Daniel Pavlovski, MK
Deborah Lambotte, BE
Diana Guardado, PT
Dumitru Todoroi, MD
Ekateryna Shcherbakova, BY
Evgeny Voropaev, NN
Fabio Naselli, AL
Flaviana Rotaru, RO
Francisco Melero, ES
Gian Matteo Apuzzo, IT
Gorana Mijatović, RS
Hannah Marston, UK
Helen Kelly, IE
Hrvoje Belani, HR
Igor Ljubi, HR
Ildikó Modláné Görgényi, HU
Jasmina Baraković Husić, BA
Jennifer Lumetzberger, AT
João Apóstolo, PT
John Deepu, IE
John Dinsmore, IE
Joost van Hoof, NL
Kadi Lubi, EE
Katja Valkama, FI
Kazumasa Yamada, JP
Kirstin Martin, NR
Kristin S. Fulgerud, NO
Lea Lebar, SI
Lenka Lhotská, CZ
Leonardo Angelini, CH
Liane Colonna, SE
Lucía González López, ES
Lucie Vidovićová, CZ
Luiza Spiru, RO
Mara Diaconu, NO
Mariyana Lyubenova, BG
Marija Cimbaljević, RS
Marija Džida, HR
Marko Gošović, ME
Marta Fernandez, ES
Martin Kampel, AT
Mateja Nagode, SI
Milica Solarević, RS
Minna Zechner, FI
Natali Dmitrieva, BY
Nikolai Gapanovich-Kaidalov,
BY
Nimet Ovayolu, TR
Nina Jøransson, NO
Odeta Durmishi Manahasa,
AL
Ozlem Ovayolu, TR
Pauline Boland, IE
Pedro Roseiro, PT
Rosa Silva, PT
Roxana Elena Cziker, IS
Sabina Baraković, BA
Signe Tomsone, LV
Silvina Santana, PT
Simona Hvalič-Touzery, SI
Sonja Hansen, DK
Sonja Müller, DE
Stefan Danschutter, BE
Tamara Sharshakova, BY
Tatjana Lončar-Turukalo, RS
Vanja Vasiljev, HR
Ville Lethola, NL
Willeke van Staalduinen, NL
Zoltán Alexin, HU
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1. Introduction | Why SHAFE is needed
1.1 SHAFE origin and objectives
The journey of SHAFE (Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments) started with the naivest enthusiasm,
as all small things start. Thanks to so many committed organisations and individuals in Europe, a very
small conviction and dream has grown into a solid movement. And even into a new word: SHAFE. This
only happens when ideas make sense and come in the right historic time. The meaning and notion of
SHAFE as a holistic approach that promotes the alignment of policies and strategies is a unique
roadmap for the implementation in and across Europe.
To introduce the NET4Age-Friendly mapping of policies and models, an introduction that refers to the
concept and evolution of the SHAFE concept, as well as its implementation in specific projects is
needed.
Smart, adaptable and inclusive solutions can help improve and support independent life throughout
the course of life, regardless of age, gender, disabilities, cultural differences and personal choices.
A holistic approach that optimizes social and physical environments, supported by digital tools and
services, allows to provide better health and social care, promoting not only independent living, but
also equity and active participation in society. This approach follows the United Nations' line-up, with
the Sustainable Development Goals (in particular Objectives 3 and 11), stating that sustainable
environments for all ages represent the basis for ensuring a better future for the entire population
and addressing most of the growing issues of the ageing population.
1
The challenges of different sectors, such as ICT, the building industry and urban planning and the
health and social care, as well as those of citizens and their communities are interlinked. Responding
to these challenges will foster awareness and support for the creation and implementation of smart,
healthy and inclusive environments for present and future generations that enable them to learn,
grow, work, socialise and enjoy a healthy life, benefiting from the use of digital innovations,
accessibility solutions and adaptable support models in the European context.
The community is the physical, social and cultural ecosystem closest to people, built on relationships
of trust, sharing, solidarity and intimacy, where people find social, cultural and identity references,
socialise and live their daily lives. The objective conditions of the environment (pollution, accessibility,
mobility, safety, comfort) affect the quality of life and wellbeing of citizens, particularly in the context
of climate change and thus affect the whole community circle.
Thus, we foster actions that promote partnerships between technological and digital innovation,
architecture, urban planning, social studies and health sciences to design and simulate communities
of belonging that leverage on the potential of each sector to promote the existential dignity of all
persons, regardless of their age, gender, health, social, educational, economic, cultural and identity
conditions, as well as the levels of development of the region where they live.
This is SHAFE. This new concept was created since 2017, based on the desire to implement Smart
Healthy Age-Friendly Environments (SHAFE) across Europe, fostering happier and healthier people in
all communities. This idea took shape and became a solid movement.
1
https://sdgs.un.org/goals (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
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SHAFE began as a Thematic Network
2
, approved by the European Commission, to draw policy makers,
organisations and citizens’ attention to the need of better alignment between health, social care, built
environments and ICT, both in policy and funding and delivered a Joint Statement and a Framing Paper
in December 2018 to the European Commission and Member States.
After this, SHAFE evolved to a European Stakeholders Network in 2019, which currently has over 170
partner organisations and is coordinated by Carina Dantas and Willeke van Staalduinen. This is
followed by the installation of COST Action 19136 International interdisciplinary network on smart
healthy age-friendly environments (NET4Age-Friendly) in 2020.
The Stakeholders Network was working to achieve better COOPERATION and IMPLEMENTATION, as
the major challenges for the next period, as stated in the Position Paper released in 2020, with
recommendations that aim to promote healthier environments for all citizens and make environments
accessible, sustainable and reachable for all, with the support of ICT.
The pandemic has uncovered the major opportunities and benefits of turning digital. However, single
digital solutions are not the panacea to all the societal challenges. Citizens across different age groups
also need personal human contact; they need to meet, to talk to each other, to hug and to love.
Digitalization cannot replace this human need but can be a powerful vehicle to support people. The
scenario during 2021 is an opportunity for the digital revolution to be well thought and implemented,
if all the adequate challenges are well considered and tackled.
The Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments Network thus focus on the narrative, debate, disclosure
and knowledge translation of solutions to optimize the physical and social environments of individuals
in a concerted manner.
From the early concept, several projects have been implementing SHAFE in the field: NET4Age-
Friendly is one of the most recent.
1.2 Working on the realisation of SHAFE
Since the launch of SHAFE as thematic network in 2018, several initiatives and projects took place
since then. Besides the approval of SHAFE as COST Action CA19136 International interdisciplinary
network on smart healthy age-friendly environments, other projects related to SHAFE were approved.
Erasmus+ is the EU’s programme to support education, training, youth, and sport in Europe in
multinational consortia. These areas are key to support citizens’ personal and professional
development. High quality, inclusive education and training, as well as informal and non-formal
learning, ultimately equip participants of all ages with the qualifications and skills needed for their
meaningful participation in a democratic society, intercultural understanding, and successful
transition in the labour market. Within the frame of Erasmus+, training and education is developed to
empower facilitators to implement smart healthy inclusive environments in their community. Projects
such as “Hands-on SHAFE”
3
, “Educational game BIG”
4
, “Bridge the Gap!”
5
, and “DESIgn for all methods
2
https://en.caritascoimbra.pt/shafe/ (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
3
www.hands-on-shafe.eu (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
4
www.big-game.eu (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
5
www.bridgethegap-project.eu (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
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to cREate age-friendly housing” (DESIRE)
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supported by the Erasmus+ programme include adult
learners in the field of inclusive environments.
“Hands-on SHAFE” aims to deliver online training packages for informal learning experiences and
hands-on tools to improve the skills of people of all ages and especially seeks to enable persons with
lower skills or qualifications to choose and implement SHAFE in their own homes or neighbourhoods.
In this way, the project fosters and promotes social inclusion for people of all ages and genders,
including people with cognitive or physical impairments or disabilities. It also aims to enable citizens
to become innovators and trailblazers in their own neighbourhoods or to become entrepreneurs in
the field of SHAFE services and products.
The educational game “Building Inclusive environments for all Generations” (BIG) elaborates further
on the training about SHAFE by developing an online game. The player can meet and solve the
challenges of characters during the play, such as inaccessible housing for a wheelchair, loading goods
in a car while taking care of a child, or visiting a restaurant with impaired sight. The project will also
develop a workshop methodology to use the game in joint training settings.
The “Bridge the Gap!” project focuses on the training of older people to create and improve their own
living environments to support independent living and participation in society. On the one hand, the
training offers traditional means to advocate their interests. On the other hand, it will focus on the
capacity building of older adults to use digital skills to improve their social and digital participation.
Such digital actions include accessing social media, building online advocacy accounts, or sharing
photos to express to stakeholders and decision-makers specific local needs to improve the local living
environment.
The DESIRE project is developed by an international partnership involving four countries working on a
design for all (D4ALL) concept applied to age-friendly housing. DESIRE aims to provide professionals in
the building industry as well as furniture and home furnishings sector with the tools and skills to apply
D4ALL methods as an integral part of the design process, with the aim to create or adapt age-friendly
housing as a solution for the well-being, comfort and autonomy of older adults or people in situation
of dependency at home. The project will develop an innovative training course on D4ALL to meet the
emotional, cognitive, and social needs of older adults while driving new opportunities in the habitat
sector, fostering interactions and knowledge exchange in the design process between cross-cutting
fields such as science, social sciences, and arts.
Within the Interreg Europe programme of funding, another SHAFE initiative was granted: the
EU_SHAFE project (2019-2024).
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The EU_SHAFE project will improve policies and practices in 6
European regions by developing a comprehensive approach to Smart Healthy Age-Friendly
Environments (SHAFE). Through a 'learning by sharing' methodology, this robust multi-disciplinary and
intersectoral consortium will build a four-helix European community to exchange experiences and
practices to improve multilevel policy instruments. The consortium will create a cooperative, inclusive
ecosystem between public authorities, European networks and user’s associations, embedding their
experience and skills with research & design knowledge from academia and SMEs for the growth of
community-based services and “ageing at home” around Europe. EU_SHAFE will invest in policy design
and adaptation of regional instruments derived from ETCF (R&I priorities) and ESF (Social Inclusion),
through the creation of a large Euro-local network of stakeholders that will work together in
ecosystems towards a common model a White Paper on SHAFE. Select and re-design concrete and
6
www.projectdesire.eu (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
7
https://www.interregeurope.eu/eushafe/ (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
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scalable interventions in the area of social innovation for SHAFE, that may be implemented as realistic
innovative models for the future.
1.3 SHAFE mid-term goals
As referred in the SHAFE Position Paper released in 2020
8
, it is important to acknowledge the serious
societal challenges in current times, especially those related to demographic change and the COVID-
19 pandemic, implying it is not possible anymore to work in silos or to keep positions for individual
interest. Before any other role, we all are citizens and we have a duty as researchers, academics, policy
makers, practitioners, industry and business to work together in a bid for a better world.
SHAFE will aim to continue providing its contributions, most of all to maintain and continue to collate
and collaborate the innovative contributions from its partners with the view of a shared vision: to
implement Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments around Europe and promote happier and
healthier people in all communities.
SHAFE focuses on the following areas:
CITIZENS
To be digitally skilled
To be aware and understand the benefits and challenges on the sharing of their data
To be engaged in healthier lifestyles (including through increased health literacy)
To participate and engage (in the democratic life)
To maintain or improve as much as possible their social networks and relationships
ENVIRONMENTS
To retrofit and adapt the housing stock
To foster accessible and adapted public spaces and transport
To implement climate neutral solutions
To promote health & wellbeing in the workplace
HEALTH AND CARE
To promote reliable, safe and accessible big data
To implement robust and interoperable digital infrastructures
To foster integrated, personalized, affordable and person-centered solutions (new pathways)
To implement guidelines and long-term funding solutions/business models
To train care professionals on digital skills.
By 2022, the Stakeholders Network on SHAFE aims to achieve mainly COORDINATION and
IMPLEMENTATION of SHAFE solutions including dealing with public health emergencies such as
pandemic outbreaks, specifically the following higher-level goals:
8
https://en.caritascoimbra.pt/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/10/SHAFE-Position-Paper-011020.pdf.
(Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
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Promote training of formal and informal caregivers (communities) on SHAFE, creating a toolkit and
implementing training actions in multiple countries (building on the Erasmus+ project hands- on-
SHAFE main outputs);
Raise awareness on the need to enhance prevention, social care, building infrastructure and
environment conditions in order to move Health and Wellbeing provision to the home and towards
community and personalized prevention to a Health and Wellbeing value-based approach
(through COST Action NET4Age-Friendly);
Jointly develop sustainable business cases with insurance companies and investors and support
public authorities and health and social care providers on implementing SHAFE, especially
regarding building or restructuring the built environment to include ICT solutions with integrated
health and care provision and safe human interrelations, to foster future investments on smart
healthy environments (building on the ElPonAHA Innovation to Market (l2M) and
DigitalHealthEurope project findings, through the ECHAIIiance);
Organise education and raise awareness of urban planners, architects and ICT-developers in
general to focus on PEOPLE and PLACES and focus research on lifelong learning, evidence-based
design, smart healthy environments and empowerment, and social distancing (with SHAFE and
ElPonAHA stakeholders).
POLITICAL MEASURES TO IMPLEMENT IN SHAFE ECOSYSTEMS:
1.3.1 Housing / Built Environments
In the field of Housing/Built Environments
(urban and rural), inequal conditions of
living highlight the importance of providing
housing with the necessary conditions for
adult people to stay in their homes as they
age, namely through:
Access to adapted residences or
financial and technical support for
adaptation and requalification works;
A sufficient supply of adaptable
housing;
Increased energy efficiency of
housing and equipment;
Introduction of eco-psychological
perspectives of planning and managing built
environments;
Prioritizing and pointing out people
in social and financial needs, promoting
more favourable environments.
In this area, the emerging needs and requirements of retrofitting existing buildings adds to the building
demands of new housing structures with climate change resilience.
Figure 1 - measures per stakeholder group to realise SHAFE
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The creation of support infrastructures for alt citizens, including older people in the face of extreme
climate phenomena, and the promotion of a landscape architecture of urban space that allows a
higher life quality for citizens must also be added.
Outdoor spaces and buildings, such as meeting places, shops, public transport and restaurants have
to be accessible, affordable and safe to enable people to meet each other and socialise, to travel or to
buy their daily shopping. The coronavirus outbreak brings the society to think of new and innovative
building concepts in which safe social distancing and social meetings still can take place.
The houses need to be considered as a potential space for work and life 24 hours a day.
This can be the perfect storm to organize new building standards and retrofitting programmes that
will allow also for a better ageing at home and in the community.
1.3.2 Social Participation
In the field of Social Participation, the challenges refer often to:
Attracting new residents to tow density territories, especially those unbalanced in terms of ageing
and demography;
Enhancing mid-level professions essential for training caregivers and workers in social care;
Reorganisation of and training according to current and future territorial needs;
Promotion of the civic participation and advocacy of potentially vulnerable groups, such as older
adults, socially and economically disadvantaged, migrants and refugees, amongst others.
Social participation is a right that should be promoted and protected but also a duty of citizens to
promote social cohesion, a more participatory democracy and the development of adequate societal
transformation.
It is essential to engage a broader range of European population in policy decisions, including the
adequate use of resources and the definition of the priorities of investment.
To this aim, also more territorial balance is needed; adequate training and literacy enhancement are
some of the most relevant activities to progress. awareness raising and intergenerational initiatives
can also boost a more participatory engagement.
1.3.3 Communication and Information
In the field of Communication and Information, expressed needs are associated with:
Effective appropriation of information by all types of target audiences, regardless of their age,
educational background, training, level of literacy or possible difficulties and disabilities.
Citizens having access to “good Information” through the most appropriate means or tools.
Quality health promotion, namely through cognitive stimulation, as well as increased digital
literacy.
This also implies that it is necessary to gain greater understanding of various topics including:
1) the effects of increased use of social media,
2) take a critical assessment on the societal mission of journalism,
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3) understand the poor use of information.
These areas are of high societal relevance and need to be addressed because to promote health and
healthy behaviour, adequate (governmental) information supply is crucial.
1.3.4 Health and Community Services
In the area of Health and Community Services several needs exist, namely the:
Humanisation of health services, in particular the increase of medical appointments duration,
better interaction between patient and professional, good adherence habits and more human and
equipment resources;
New healthcare delivery concepts that prevent isolation and lack of access, namely those that are
sustainable and of high-quality; promote physical activity; that can provide solutions for pandemic
or emergency situations; and reduce virus spreading to staff and other patients;
The reinforcement of workers and services in general, and in the area of mental health in
particular, especially for children and the ageing population.
1.3.5 Further integration of citizen-centred care
Integration of SHAFE key elements in built healthcare assets;
Person-centred life-course approach of health promotion.
The urgency to promote better and greater articulation between primary and community care
partners must be addressed. This is specifically aimed towards greater prevention for less treatment.
At the level of challenges, greater innovation has been proposed at the home care level, with the
introduction of differentiated services. However, there is still a road to go through regarding palliative
and long-term care, with a view to facilitating the adequate environment with less waiting lists.
Additionally, there is still a need for greater articulation of health and social policy agendas.
Furthermore, there is a need for flexibility in the delivery of services and cooperation agreements that
allow innovation to engage.
1.4 United Nations Sustainability Development Goals
Figure 2 - SHAFE / NET4Age-Friendly recognised by the United Nations as a good practice
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SHAFE / NET4Age-Friendly recognised by the United Nations as a good practice
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The United Nations launched an Open call for good practices, success stories and lessons learned by
all stakeholders in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda.
More than 700 submissions were reviewed by a team of experts from United Nations entities and
SHAFE implemented through NET4Age-Friendly was one of the recognized good practices from all
over the world.
SHAFE and NET4Age-Friendly are international networks that engage all levels of society with the
intrinsic aim of promoting the development of local, regional or national inclusive ecosystems
(composed of a quadruple helix of citizens, public authorities, companies, and researchers) which
interact and coordinate at the international level. This strategy allows them to literally become viral,
by exponentially increasing the networking, the dissemination and knowledge exchange among
scientists, business, public, local administrations, policy makers, professionals, and citizens. This brings
an inspiring and fruitful new way of cooperation that fosters knowledge and promote grassroot
implementation at a broader scale, combining top-down and bottom-up perspectives.
The meaning and notion of SHAFE as a holistic approach that promotes the alignment of policies and
strategies is a unique roadmap for the implementation in and across Europe. When we acknowledge
the serious challenges, especially those related to demographic change and the COVID-19 pandemic,
it is not possible anymore to still work in silos or to keep positions for individual interest. Before any
other role, we all are citizens and we have a duty as to work together in a bid for a better world. COVID
has not directly impacted the implementation of SHAFE, au contraire, the inclusive environments
proposed by NET4Age-Friendly would be adequate solutions to minimise the effects of the pandemic
and relieve the pressure on health and care systems.
1.5 EU policy on SHAFE
The demographic trends that have been ongoing worldwide are deeply influencing the organisation
and delivery of social and health services, in the effort of addressing the growing complexity of
citizens’ needs and to further complicate the challenge, the current Covid-19 pandemic has been
increasing the risk of exclusion, poverty, inequalities in the access to health, social care, other public
services and, moreover, increasing the digital divide.
Europe has been making an unprecedented effort for a concerted action towards a more Equal EU
and this implies supporting collaborations to develop and implement a shared vision to strengthen EU
research and innovation, and bringing together all the relevant actors at European, national and
regional levels, across different policy areas to handle these societal challenges and involve all levels
of the innovation chain.
The life-course approach that is at the heart of SHAFE is now embedded in the European Green Paper
on Ageing
10
, that focuses on a life-cycle approach and on individual and societal implications of ageing.
Innovations are a key enabler for accessibility, sustainability, integration and equity of social and
health services: hence the need to ensure adequate, multidisciplinary approaches to education and
9
https://sdgs.un.org/partnerships/shafe-implemented-through-net4age-friendly (Accessed: October 1st,
2021).
10
https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/d918b520-63a9-11eb-aeb5-
01aa75ed71a1/language-en (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
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learning of the professional workforce across sectors, and life-long learning to foster intergenerational
solidarity and fairness between both young and old.
The same approach is reflected in the EU4Health 2021-2027 strategy
11
: our vision for a healthier
Union, the response to improve the resilience of European Health systems. Such program coherently
supports international cooperation through its 10 objectives, that focus on disease prevention and
health promotion, preparedness for cross border health threats, strengthen health data and
accelerate the digital transformation. New knowledge and evidences will be generated, as a basis for
the development of informed political and strategic interventions translating the good practices and
tools into services for the citizens.
A life course, proactive approach, overcomes the boundaries of the health sector and spans in the
environment where we live and thrive: hence the pillars of the European planning for 2021-2027,
focusing on the “twin transitions”: green and digital, where advances in robotics and smart tech are
going to speed up the circular economy and implement the European Green Deal from recovery to
social innovation.
11
https://ec.europa.eu/health/funding/eu4health_en (Accessed: October 1st, 2021).
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2. Mapping SHAFE
SHAFE policies refer to the coordinated efforts to implement Smart Healthy Age-Friendly
Environments across Europe, fostering happier and healthier people in all communities. Such policies
need a synergic action at the locoregional, national and international levels in order to achieve better
alignment between health, social care, built environments and ICT, both in policy and funding.
Four main mapping strategies were retrieved when developing WG4 works and collecting the country
reports. These areas will be further explored in the following three years of the Action:
2.1 Mapping SHAFE policies per country/region
Despite the Joint Statement and a Framing Paper in December 2018 to the European Commission and
Member States was delivered by a large community of stakeholders, there is currently a large variety
of policies at the local, regional and national levels. The President of Portugal supported SHAFE in
2018, and a Portuguese national network on SHAFE was established. The holistic approach that
highlights SHAFE policies also occurs in Ireland, Spain, the United Kingdom and Japan, where age-
friendly policymaking is part of national or regional policy. Other countries have local age-friendly
policies, such as The Netherlands, Iceland and Poland. In these and many other countries,
municipalities became a member of the World Health Organisation Global Network on Age-friendly
Cities and Communities (1100 members worldwide). Finally, other involved countries seem not to
have a stable set of policies and holistic approaches.
Concluding, every country develops policies of single or multiple outcomes of SHAFE. These outcomes
are to promote independent living, foster participation and social inclusion and secure healthy ageing
is found in many policies that partners report. The concerted, multifaceted approach of SHAFE is not
clear yet to find in most countries, however some cross-sectoral developments are already taking
place. Partners describe the involvement of Ambient Assisted Living solutions in projects, funding and
pilots to promote independent living. This approach brings together smart solutions and living
environments. Combat isolation or support participation of individuals in society are often joint
initiatives from municipalities, housing organisations, welfare institutions and volunteers’’
organisations at local level. Healthy ageing is part of various public health programmes in many
countries.
2.2 Mapping relevant stakeholders and policy makers
As indicated by the contributors, the main players in the field of SHAFE are local and national
authorities. In countries with a strong regional focus, such as Spain and Italy, regional authorities play
the most important role on SHAFE. Sometimes, as is the case in Portugal, non-profit organisations
define policies on social, digital and healthy issues.
Coordination between national and regional policies need to be further explored and described in
order to complement the different roles of public and private organisations.
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2.3 Mapping partners’ ecosystems interesting for NET4
Half of the countries report to have one or more ecosystems that are related to SHAFE and/or
interesting for NET4. Most of the ecosystems are local or regional.
To improve the capacity of NET4Age-Friendly members on building and maintaining ecosystems, a
webinar was organised by Action members from the ECHAlliance: How to build and nurture a
regional/national ecosystem. The webinar gathered around 70 participants, on the 29th April 2021.
Figure 3 - Webinar How to build and nurture a regional/national ecosystem
The main aim of this session was to provide the Action participants with the adequate strategy, tools
and exemplary cases that support them to promote local, regional and national ecosystems in their
countries, that help to implement SHAFE solutions. The session was hosted by Carina Dantas (Chair)
and Willeke van Staalduinen (Vice-Chair) and started with the inspirational talk of Brian O’Connor,
ECHAlliance Director, “What is an ecosystem and how to build it, grow and connect”, reminding
participants that the needs of local stakeholders should be at the cornerstone of any ecosystem.
Following this introduction, Alexia Zurkuhlen (Digital Health Rheinland - Germany) and Gisela Garcia-
Alvarez (Health Cluster Galicia - Spain) presented their ecosystems, how they were born, governed,
organised and also provided excellent recommendations on how to promote successful examples in
other regions and countries. In the next slot of the session, Valentina Tageo presented the main
conclusions of the work developed on “Enablers and challenges to implement and scale up solutions
- the role of ecosystems”, based on the outcomes of the DigitalHealthProject and started the
discussion with ecosystem representatives and the participants, especially grassroot organisations of
different EU countries, on what needs to be enhanced and promoted, namely in what concerns digital
literacy and digital infrastructure. More information available in the brochure “Supporting demand
and supply for scaling up digital health and care solutions” https://digitalhealtheurope.eu/results-and-
publications/supporting-demand-and-supply-for-scaling-up-digital-health-and-care-solutions/.
Willeke Van Staalduinen closed the webinar with a highlight of the key points: listen to users and plant
the seeds to collect beautiful flowers.
On August 11th, 2021, the Action organised a webinar on the building of social networks, using social
media such as LinkedIn and Facebook. 30 participants shared their information on how they built up
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their existing networks, how they maintain them and which challenges they face. Good profiling in
social networks is another asset to attract people to maintain networks.
2.4 Mapping funding opportunities interesting for NET4 consortium
At local, regional and national levels, contributors identified several opportunities for funding. For
example, funding of active and healthy ageing, digitalisation programmes, among others. At the
European and international level, there is an extensive list from the results of the Scientific
Questionnaire, including Interreg, Horizon Europe, Erasmus+.
2.5 Mapping relevant business models and sustainability means
Just a few examples of potential business models were shared by partners. Most of the contributors
did not mention any model. Other contributors sometimes doubted what is meant by business
models.
Most common business model is the CANVAS model. This model invites organisations to identify the
main partners, key activities, human and financial capital, value propositions, network, business
channels and co-creators.
SWOT analyses (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) are additional models that can be
used to (jointly) define the organisational or departmental strategy and tactics.
An extended SWOT analysis is the so-called SWOART: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities,
Aspirations, Results and Threats. Making use of data delivery it becomes feasible to identify the results
that come out of Weaknesses and Strengths. Also it support to define the Aspirations for
Opportunities and Threats.
2.6 Facilitators, the Learning Repository and the Exploitation Booster
Mechanisms
With the support of a Virtual Mobility Grant, WG4 Members have harmonized the initial results and
build up new mechanisms for further exploitation of the work so far undertaken. 11 clusters of focus
areas have been created in order to organize further discussions and actions taken.
Based on the information provided, especially through the country reports and to be used as a starting
point, the areas of interest and excellence as well as identified needs were thus anchored and grouped
into 11 clusters. After extended discussions with each country’s representatives, and in the next Grant
Periods, refinements and updates will be added to achieve the final form of the clusters and areas oof
interest, which will also be opened to further discussions with other Working Groups, namely for
knowledge sharing and success and failure stories.
The collaboration across 46 countries was also activated by employing two tools:
1) The NET4Age-Friendly Learning Repository and
2) the NET4Age-Friendly Exploitation Booster.
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The Learning Repository is built with the aim
to develop an online Learning Repository to
exploit the outcomes from the mapping of
the age-friendly country ecosystems:
Specific objectives:
SO1. To build up a repository where relevant information on the ecosystem exists.
SO2 The possibility to add more relevant research reports, studies and analyses relevant to SHAFE and
to organize it in a coherent manner.
Based on the experience with guiding and developing the Annexes of the present deliverable,
countries and regions have displayed the same challenges, different contextual factors and generally
they orient towards the same pillars of the age-friendly ecosystem.
Thus, based on the mapping of the SHAFE ecosystem at country level, 3 cluster topics have been
developed:
Cluster 1: It comprises the evidence-based strategies, programs and platforms at national
level.
Cluster 2: It comprises evidence of a strong dialogue between science and technology, having
as points of focus: smart housing, centres of expertise, specific support tools and others as
such.
Cluster 3: Mechanisms which increase social participation and inclusion of the older adult
communities.
TOPICS
SUB-TOPICS
COUNTRIES/MEMBERS
STRATEGIES
Legislation
Croatia, Finland, Hungary, Iceland, Japan,
Montenegro, Spain.
Working
Documents
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic,
Norway, Portugal, UK.
Platforms
Austria, Denmark, Romania, EU.
TECHNOLOGY AND
SCIENCE
Programs
Croatia, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Japan, Portugal.
Support
Services
Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Hungary,
Netherlands, Norway, Spain.
Networking
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Czech Republic, Finland,
Ireland, Italy, Moldova, Netherlands, Norway,
Portugal, Romania, Spain, UK.
e-Health
Austria, Belarus, Cyprus, Denmark, Netherlands.
Digitalisation
Germany, Iceland, Norway, Spain.
Centres of
Expertise
Belgium, Hungary, Iceland, Lithuania.
Research
Cyprus, Finland, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Portugal,
Spain, Sweden.
Housing
Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Spain.
LOCAL AND OLDER
ADULT PARTICIPATION
Small Scale
Initiatives
Belgium, Norway.
Seniors’
Participation
Austria, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Ireland,
Spain, UK.
Source: Virtual Mobility Report, November 8th, 2021
Figure 4 - The Learning Repository structure
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3. Conclusions and further actions
From the inventory we learned that SHAFE in partner countries shows a shattered picture. Many
countries work on topics of independent living, healthy ageing, digital transformation and social
participation. Income support to older adults and economy opportunities are additional findings.
Holistic approaches as the SHAFE concept (or the WHO AFE concept) stands for, is not very often found
in the reports.
We recommend to the COST Action members of NET4Age-Friendly the following actions:
1. Partners invest in the creation of networks with the quadruple helix and maintain ecosystems.
Being a member of NET4Age-Friendly also includes the building of networks and ecosystems at
local, regional or national level. We will continue to offer to learn how to build up networks with
citizens, housing companies, urban planning, health and social care. Each MC member is asked to
report once per year about the progress.
2. Create small groups of buddy or mentor system for creating ecosystems. Deliver support to
members to build and maintain local, regional or national ecosystems or networks and jointly
explore opportunities from holistic approaches. This will be coordinated by the training school
organiser and will become part of the training schools.
3. Business modelling to identify opportunities on SHAFE. In the second year of the Action we pay
much attention to the capacity building on business modelling in the field of SHAFE. We will start
with webinars about the topic, and organise training schools on this theme.
4. Funding opportunities will be further sustained. The initial inventory of partners’ knowledge of
funding opportunities will be further exploited in the second year of the Action. We will organise
webinars on the topic and funding will become part of the training schools.11 clusters of focus
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4. ANNEXES
4.1 ANNEX 1 Template country inventory
D4. WG report on policies, funding opportunities and networking - M9 (end of July 2021)
Name contributor and country:
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
For example: legislation and policy measures to realise SHAFE, inclusive design for all, improve
participation and social inclusion, foster healthcare and social care, eHealth and smart home
technology measures
[Give an outline what (national, regional or local) policies in your country are to achieve smart healthy
age-friendly environments and related topics]:
1. Who do you identify as relevant stakeholders and policy makers in your country?
In the following domains:
Local
Regional
National
Health
Social
Built environment
Digitalisation
Development
Education
Research
Other: please specify
Other: please specify
2. (National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE you are involved in your country
For example: (informal) cooperative structures or bonds consisting of citizens, public authorities,
companies, non-governmental organisations, health and social care providers, research and academia
working on SHAFE, inclusive design for all, participation and social inclusion, care provision and ICT
implementation
[Name of the ecosystem]:
[Describe shortly the partners of the ecosystem]:
[When appropriate: please provide links]:
3. (National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE in your country
For example: national or local governmental funding programmes, research funded programmes,
citizen participation programmes, ICT development and implementation funding
[Describe shortly the funding opportunities that could be of interest for NET4 current and future
(national) partners]:
[When appropriate: please provide links]:
4. Examples of relevant business models, sustainability means and strategies to address and
implement SHAFE
Evidence-based for SHAFE (colleting the activities to populate the canvas)
[Please can you share any examples?]:
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4.2 ANNEX 2 Country contributions
1. Albania
Contributors: Odeta Durmishi Manahasa, Fabio Naselli
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments:
Under the Ministry of Health and Social Protection
12
, there is the Department of Government Social
Services
13
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
Institute of Public Health
-
Ministry of Health and Social
Protection, Health Insurance Institute,
Social
Municipality
-
Ministry of Health and Social
Protection
Built
environment
Municipality, Private housing
enterprises and developers
City planning/urban planning
-
Ministry of Infrastructure and Energy
Digitalisation
-
-
Digital Alliance
Telecom and cable providers
Ministry Infrastructure and Energy
Development
Municipality
-
Education
Provincial Health Directorate
-
Ministry of Education, Sport and Youth
Research
Provincial Health Directorate
-
Ministry of Education, Sport and Youth
Cultural venues
Sporting venues
-
-
-
Other: please
specify
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner: NA
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE:
Social Services for older people are realized through:
Social care services provided in public service centers such as community centers, residential
centers, day care centers or at home and funded by the State Budget and local budgets of
local government bodies.
Social care services provided in
non-public (for-profit and non-
profit) service centers.
Local/ National Strategy: To ensure a wider
participation of older people in community
life, to reduce the level of loneliness and
social isolation among older people. For
12
https://shendetesia.gov.al/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
13
http://www.sherbimisocial.gov.al/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
Monthly payments are made to individuals aged 65 and
over by the Ministry of Health and The Social Protection
Municipalities provide free urban transportation and
free health care for older people.
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this, local governments build local support plans / policies for older people, within local social plans
and mechanisms for the participation of older people, especially women, in the decision-making
process.
2. Austria
Contributors: Martin Kampel, Jennifer Lumetzberger (TU Vienna, Computer Vision Lab)
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
Dachverband der
Sozialversicherungsträger (umbrella
organisation of the social insurance
institutions);
Bundesministerium für Soziales,
Gesundheit, Pflege und
Konsumentenschutz (Federal ministry for
social, health, care and consumer
protection); österreichisches Rotes Kreuz
(austrian red cross), Vamed
Social
Fonds Soziales Wien, Wiener
Sozialdienste Alten- und
Pflegedienste
Providers of statutory social security,
providers of healthcare services, Federal
Ministry of Social Affairs, Health, Care and
Consumer Protection (BMSGPK), Caritas,
Lebenshilfe, Diakonie Österreich,
Hilfswerk, Licht ins Dunkel, Kolping,
Volkshilfe, Austrian Senior Citizens
‘Council
Built
environment
Strabag, Porr, Wienerberger
Digitalisation
Bundesministerium “Digitalisierung und
Wirtschaftsstandort” (Federal ministry of
eHealth initiative: information and communication strategy for a modern Austrian
healthcare system (recommendation), 2007
IHE Initiative: Association for promoting the integration of IT and medical
technologies in the Austrian health care system
HEALIX: communication infrastructure for IT applications in the healthcare system
ELGA: electronic health records
eHealth strategy board: control group for coordinating and accompanying actors in
health and social system.
AAL Austria
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digitalization and economy) 14 ; Digital
Austria15
Development
Alysis, casenio, cogvis, Digitaal
Life, Doro, ELDAT, ilogs, Philips,
telecare systems
Education
Bundesministerium für Bildung,
Wissenschaft und Forschung16
(Federal ministry of education, science
and research)
Research
Medical University Vienna, Vienna
University of Technology,
University of Technology Graz,
University Innsbruck, AIT, FH
Wiener Neustadt, FH Campus
Wien, FH Burgenland, FH
Joanneum, Carinthia University of
Applied Sciences FH
Oberösterreich, FH St. Pölten, FH
Technikum Wien, FH Vorarlberg
Salzburg
Research
Bundesministerium für Bildung,
Wissenschaft und Forschung17 ; Austrian
Interdisciplinary Platform on Ageing
(ÖPIA)18;
Other: please
specify
Other: please
specify
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner
AAL Austria
19
Pilot regions of AAL
20
Currently, innovative AAL solutions are being or have been installed in about 1000 Austrian
households and residential units, tested in everyday use and scientifically evaluated.
In the benefit programme, the Austrian Research Promotion Agency FFG funds test regions with the
aim of developing system solutions that enable smart home applications in terms of comfort and
lifestyle elements as well as support and care. The underlying processes of the services are to be taken
into account. These system solutions will be evaluated in larger benefit test regions, especially in urban
environments and with interfaces to Smart Cities technologies and services. Not only will the actual
use of the solutions be evaluated, but also the social added value.
- WEST AAL test region
21
- multimodAAL
- 24hQuAALity - regionAAL
- Fit4AAL - Smart VitAALity
- gAALaxy - WAALter
- i-evAALuation - ZentrAAL
- moduLAAR
14
https://www.itsv.at/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
15
https://www.digitalaustria.gv.at/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
16
https://www.bmbwf.gv.at/en.html (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
17
https://www.bmbwf.gv.at/en.html (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
18
http://www.oepia.at/en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
19
Ibidem
20
https://www.aal.at/pilotregionen-3/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
21
https://www.west-aal.at/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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(National, regional, local) funding
opportunities on SHAFE
FWF: Austrian Science Fund
22
FFG: Austrian Research Promotion
Agency
23
, e.g. benefit programme
24
WWTF: Vienna Science and
Technology Fund
25
Examples of relevant business models, sustainability means and strategies to address and
implement SHAFE N/A
3. Belgium
Contributors: Deborah Lambotte, Stefan Danschutter
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
The decree ‘local social policy’
(Art. 4 and 7)
26
supports municipalities in the realisation of a local social policy and stimulates
municipalities to adopt a leading role. Municipalities are encouraged to develop a well-
supported, integral and inclusive (local) social policy, in cooperation with local actors and the
local population. In order to realise a good local social policy, the municipalities need to
formulate policy objectives in relation to the local needs and involve and stimulate
participation of their citizens in policy preparation and implementation. Therefore, the
majority of Flemish municipalities have a local advisory council for older adults.
The region of Flanders is responsible for the policy on health care provision within and outside
health care institutions (with the exception of that which is explicitly reserved for the federal
government), preventive health care and the recognition of health care professions. à Agency
for Care and Health
27
o Policy on preventive healthcare
28
o The development of the Flemish social protection
29
o Primary care
30
o Home care
31
o Mental health care
32
o Policy on health care professions
33
22
https://www.fwf.ac.at/en/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
23
https://www.ffg.at/en/content/information-technology-overview (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
24
https://www.ffg.at/programm/benefit (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
25
https://www.wwtf.at/index.php?lang=EN (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
26
https://codex.vlaanderen.be/Zoeken/Document.aspx?DID=1029068&param=inhoud&ref=search&AVIDS=
27
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
28
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/preventieve-gezondheidszorg
29
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/vlaamse-sociale-bescherming (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
30
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/eerstelijnszorg (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
31
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/thuiszorg (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
32
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/geestelijke-gezondheidszorg (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
33
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/gezondheidszorgberoepen (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
The Austrian Research Promotion Agency FFG funds
test regions with the aim of developing system
solutions that enable smart home applications in terms
of comfort and lifestyle elements as well as support
and care.
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o Elderly care à residential care
decree
34
o Policy on hospitals
35
o (E)caring Flanders
36
informatisation/digitalisation
Flemish policy notes 2019-2024:
welfare, public health, family and
fighting reduction.
This policy paper contains the major strategic choices of the Flemish Government in the area
of welfare, public health, family and poverty reduction for the period 2019-2024
37
.
Flanders Housing Policy Plan
38
The set-up of funding programmes for
municipalities, healthcare organisations,
housing organisations, regarding social
housing, independent living, dementia
prevention programmes, etc.
Several centres of expertise such as:
Fall and fracture prevention
39
Dementia
40
Healthy Living
41
Informal care
42
Flemish Agency Accessible Flanders (Inter) with a number of core topics:
Building and surroundings, mobility, policy and events
o Adaptable housing
43
o Age-friendly housing
44
o Accessibility
45
Due to the institutional fragmentation, Brussels has a very complex landscape when it comes to policy
on smart healthy age-friendly environments. The best solution is to contact a local partner who can
help you find the right information, the knowledge centre Housing, well-being and care is such a
partner with numerous publications on the topic
46
In the Walloon region much of the information can be found via AVIQ (l’agence pour une vie de
qualité). A detailed overview of their actions requires further research.
34
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/ouderenzorg (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
35
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/ziekenhuizen (Accessed: 15 October, 2021))
36
https://www.zorg-en-gezondheid.be/beleid/ezorgzaam-vlaanderen (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
37
https://publicaties.vlaanderen.be/view-file/32263 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
38
https://www.wonenvlaanderen.be/woonbeleidsplan-vlaanderen (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
39
https://www.valpreventie.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
40
https://www.dementie.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
41
https://www.gezondleven.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
42
https://www.mantelzorger.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
43
http://www.meegroeiwonen.info (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
44
http://www.dezilverensleutel.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
45
https://www.toegankelijkgebouw.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
46
www.kenniscentrumwwz.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
Centres of expertise relevant to age-friendly
environment:
Fall and fracture prevention
Dementia
Healthy Living
Informal care
The majority of Flemish municipalities have a local
advisory council for older adults. The advisory
council can signal local difficulties and challenges to
the local government.
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Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
Municipalities and its
organisations
Agentschap Zorg & Gezondheid
Kenniscentrum Wonen, Welzijn, Zorg
(FL)
AVIQ l'agence pour une vie de
qualité
FOD
Volksgezondheid
Social
Municipalities and its
organisations
Vlaamse Ouderenraad
Vereniging van Vlaamse Steden en
Gemeenten
Departement Welzijn,
Volksgezondheid en Gezin
Built
environment
Municipalities and its
organisations
Agentschap Wonen-Vlaanderen
Inter Vlaams Expertisecentrum
Toegankelijkheid
CaWaB Collectif Accessibilité
Wallonie-Bruxelles
Digitalisation
FlandersCare
mHealthBelgium
Development
Education
Universities and Universities of
Applied Sciences and Arts
Collective research centers (BBRI,
Sirris,…)
Strategic research centers (IMEC,
VITO,…)
Research
Universities and Universities of
Applied Sciences and Arts
Other: please
specify
Other: please
specify
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner
HOGENT University of Applied Sciences and Arts
Research centre 360° Care and Wellbeing
47
Blue Health Innovation Center
48
In4Care
49
Licalab
50
Innovage
51
Wallonia e-helath living lab
52
Health house
53
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE
Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek
54
:
47
https://www.hogent.be/onderzoekscentra/360-zorg-en-welzijn/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
48
https://www.bhic.care/nl (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
49
https://www.in4care.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
50
https://www.licalab.be/nl (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
51
http://www.innovage.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
52
http://well-livinglab.be (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
53
http://www.health-house.be/en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
54
https://www.fwo.be/en/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Koning Boudewijnstichting
55
:
Innoviris.Brussels
56
:
Agentschap Innoveren & Ondernemen
57
:
Growfunding
58
:
Examples of relevant business models, sustainability means and strategies to address and
implement SHAFE N/A
4. Belarus
Contributors: Tamara Sharshakova, Nikolai Gapanovich-Kaidalov, Ekateryna Shcherbakova, Evgeny
Voropaev, Natali Dmitrieva
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
Today about 2 million older people live in Belarus. Of these, more than 127,000 are single. The state
has always taken care of older people.
Law of the Republic of Belarus on Social Protection of Disabled Persons in the Republic of
Belarus No. 1224-XII of November 11, 1991 [Amended as of November 16, 2010]. That is
meant to ensure the wellbeing of older adults
59
.
Law of the Republic of Belarus of July 18, 2011 No. 300-Z “On applications of citizens and legal
entities”
60
;
Decree of the President of the Republic of Belarus of October 15, 2007 No. 498 “On additional
measures for dealing with applications of citizens and legal entities”
61
;
Directive of the President of the Republic of Belarus of December 27, 2006 No. 2 “On
debureaucratization of the state machinery and improving the quality of support of vital
activities of the population”
62
;
Resolution of the Council of Ministers of the Republic of Belarus of July 23, 2012 No. 667 “On
some issues of dealing with applications of citizens and legal entities”
63
CONCEPT of e-Health Development of the Republic of Belarus for the period up to 2022
64
. E-
health is the use of electronic communication technologies for health needs: patient care,
training of health workers, detection of diseases and monitoring of public health trends.
Approved by the Order of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus of 20.03.2018. No.
244
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
Ministry of Public Health
55
https://www.kbs-frb.be/en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
56
https://innoviris.brussels (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
57
https://www.vlaio.be/nl/subsidies-financiering (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
58
https://www.growfunding.be/nl (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
59
http://law.by/document/?guid=3871&p0=V19101224e (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
60
http://www.pravo.by/document/?guid=3871&p0=H11100300 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
61
http://www.pravo.by/document/?guid=3871&p0=p30700498 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
62
http://www.pravo.by/document/?guid=3871&p0=p00600002 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
63
http://www.pravo.by/document/?guid=3871&p0=C21200667 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
64
http://rnpcmt.belcmt.by/files/Site/CONCEPT_E-Health.docx (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Social
Ministry of Labour and Social
Protection
Built
environment
Ministry of Natural Resources and
Environmental Protection
Digitalisation
Ministry of Communication and
Informatization, Ministry of
Information
Development
Ministry of Economy
Education
Ministry of Education, Ministry of
Culture
Research
Universities of Applied Sciences and
Universities are located in bigger
cities
Other: please
specify
Other: please
specify
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner
SHAFE did not work in Belarus before.
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE
Funding opportunities on SHAFE in Belarus are limited by State Budget and university budget.
Examples of relevant business models, sustainability means and strategies to address and
implement SHAFE N/A
5. Bosnia and Herzegovina
Contributors: Jasmina Baraković Husić, Sabina Baraković
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
Areas of interest to Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments (SHAFE) are defined by the legislative
framework at all levels of government in B&H. Laws at the state level, laws at the both entities levels
(i.e., the Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska), laws at the level of the Brčko
District and laws at the level of cantons in Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina have been adopted. Of
all the laws, the seniors are the focus of the following laws
65
: (i) Family law, (ii) Laws dealing with
pension and disability insurance, (iii) Laws on retirement, (iv) Laws on labor and social security of the
unemployed, (v) Law on protection from domestic violence, (vi) Law on prohibition of discrimination,
(vii) Law on rights, obligations and responsibilities of patients , (viii) Law on social protection, (ix) Law
on health insurance and protection, (x) Law on medicines and medical devices, and (xi) Regulations
and decisions in the field of health rights.
The Legal Framework for Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
65
https://epale.ec.europa.eu/en/node/163078 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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1. The laws on state level of government
66
a. Law on Amendments to the Law on Prohibition of Discrimination. Official Gazette BiH,
66/16.
b. Law on Freedom of Access to Information in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Official Gazette BiH,
28/00, 45/06, 102/09.
c. Law on Medicines and Medical Devices. Official Gazette of BiH, 58/08.
d. Law on Basics of Road Traffic Safety in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Official Gazette BiH, 6/06.
2. The laws and decisions on the entity level Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina
67
a. Law on Pension and Disability Insurance. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 13/18.
b. Law on Amendments to the Law on More Favourable Retirement of Defenders of the
Defence-Liberation War. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 90/17.
c. Law on Modifications and Amendments to the Labour Law, Official Gazette of the
Federation of BiH, 32/00, 29/03.
d. Law on Protection from Domestic Violence. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 20/13.
e. Law on Patients' Rights, Obligations and Responsibilities. Official Gazette of the
Federation of BiH, 40/10.
f. Law on modification of the Law on Mediation in Employment and Social Safety for
Unemployed Persons, Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 55/00, 9/08.
g. Law on the Fundamentals of Social Protection, Protection of Civilian Victims of War and
Protection of Families with Children. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 36/99,
54/04, 39/06, 14/09, 45/16.
h. Law on Health Insurance. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 30/97, 7/02, 70/08, 48/11.
i. Low on Health Care. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 46/10, 75/13.
j. Law on Medicines. Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 109/12.
k. Law on Patients' Rights, Obligations and Responsibilities. Official Gazette of the Federation of
BiH, 40/10.
l. Decision on determining the basic package of health rights. Official Gazette of the
Federation of BiH, 21/09.
m. Decision on health care standards and norms from compulsory health insurance. Official
Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 5/03, 18/04, 57/07, 53/08, 6/11, 104/13.
n. Decision on the List of Essential Medicines Necessary for Health Care Insurance within the
Standards of Compulsory Health Insurance in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH, 56/13, 74/14, 94/15, 12/16, 25/17.
3. The laws and decisions on the entity level Republika Srpska
68
a. Law on Social Welfare. Official Gazette of Republic of Srpska, 37/12, 90/16.
b. Law on Pension and Disability Insurance. Official Gazette of Republic of Srpska, 134/11, 82/13,
103/15.
c. Law on Health Care. Official Gazette of Republic of Srpska, 18/99, 58/01, 62/01, 106/09, 44/15.
d. Law on Health Insurance. Official Gazette of Republic of Srpska, 18/99, 51/01, 70/01,
51/03, 57/03, 17/08, 01/09, 106/09.
e. Law on Medicines. Official Gazette of Republic of Srpska, 19/01.
66
https://www.parlament.ba/home?lang=en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
67
http://www.fbihvlada.gov.ba/english/zakoni/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
68
https://www.narodnaskupstinars.net/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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f. Rulebook on exercising the right on assistance and home care. Official Gazette of Republic
of Srpska, 2/14.
4. The laws of Brčko District
69
a. The Law on Health Care of the Brčko District B&H, Official Gazette of Brčko District B&H, 38/11,
9/13, 27/14, 3/15, 50/18
b. The Law on Health Insurance of the Brčko District B&H, Official Gazette of Brčko District B&H,
01/02, 02/08, 07/02, 19/07, 34/08, 34/19, 19/20
c. The Family Law of the Brčko District B&H, Official Gazette of Brčko District B&H, 23/07
d. The Law on Social Welfare of the Brčko District B&H, Official Gazette of Brčko District B&H,
01/03, 04/04, 19/07, 02/08, 21/18, 32/19, 20/20
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
Health centres
FBIH: Ministry of Health
RS: Ministry for Health and Social Welfare
Nursing homes (*)
Social
Retirement homes (***)
Adult day-care centres
(****)
Centres for healthy
ageing
Home care and assistance
centres (*****)
FBIH: Ministry of Labor and Social Policy
RS: Ministry for Labour, Veterans and
Disability Protection
Humanitarian organisations (**)
Gerontology centres (******)
Built
environment
Municipal services for
urbanism, physical
planning and
environmental protection
FBIH: Ministry of Spatial Planning
RS: Ministry of Physical Planning,
Construction and Ecology
Digitalisation
Ministry of
Communications
and Transport
Development
Municipal services for
economy and local
development
FBIH: Ministry of Development,
Entrepreneurship and Crafts
RS: Ministry for the Economy and
Entrepreneurship
Education
FBIH: Ministry of Education and Science
RS: Ministry for Science and Technology,
Higher Education and Information
Society
Ministry of Civil
Affairs
Research
FBIH: Ministry of Education and Science
RS: Ministry for Science and Technology,
Higher Education and Information
Society
Ministry of Civil
Affairs
Other:
Tourism
Tourist communities
FBIH: FBiH Ministry of Environment and
Tourism
RS: Ministry of Trade and Tourism
Other: Human
rights
Ministry of
Human Rights and
Refugees
Note: Local domain refers to municipal level. Regional domain implies cantons and entity levels in case
of Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina (FBIH), and entity level in case of Republika Srpska (RS). National
domain refers to state level of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
69
https://skupstinabd.ba/ba/zakon.html (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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(*) The establishment of nursing homes, their operations, financing, and is governed by the cantonal
regulations on social protection and falls under the competence of the cantonal ministries of social
protection.
(**) Humanitarian organisations that provide assistance and protection to vulnerable persons,
particularly to the older persons, are Red Cross Society
70
, Caritas
71
, and Merhamet
72
.
(***) Retirement home ensures its beneficiaries housing, meals, care, putting the clothes on and taking
the clothes off, health care, cultural and entertainment, recreational, occupational and other
activities, social care and other services depending on their needs, abilities and interests.
(****) Adult day-care centres provide satisfaction of basic needs for adults with disability and older
persons through day-care.
(*****) Home care and assistance centres provide housework and home care the old and the infirm in
their homes.
(******) Gerontology centre monitors, studies, evaluates and reports on social and health needs, and
provides services directed on improving institutional and non-institutional care for older persons,
coordinates activities of stakeholders within the social protection for older persons system,
cooperating with other sectors and training and educating those who provide care for older people.
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on
SHAFE of the partner
Non-governmental organisations
Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
in Bosnia and Herzegovina represent a
wide array of interests and undertake
various activities including distribution of
humanitarian assistance, human rights
and government monitoring, research and policy development, service provision, etc. NGOs show a
wide range of capacities and ways of working, but a relatively small number of professional NGOs has
emerged in the larger urban centres
73
. These organisations have been benefited from sustained
financial support from foreign donors. For example, The United Nations Population Fund in Bosnia and
Herzegovina (UNFPA) and the NGO Partnership for Public Health are working together to build the
capacity of the existing network of Centers for Healthy Aging in Bosnia and Herzegovina
74
.
Although there are NGOs that can claim to represent the interest of their stakeholders at the state or
entity levels (e.g., development of community, social policy and protections, civil society influence on
public policy, etc.), the most of them are comprised of small, voluntary community-oriented
associations working at the municipal or cantonal level (e.g., women’s organisations, blind groups,
disease-specific groups, etc.). Only small number of NGOs at the municipal or cantonal level have
received international project funding or benefited from inclusion in NGO capacity building
70
https://ckfbih.ba/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
71
https://www.caritas.ba/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
72
https://www.merhamet.ba/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
73
https://www.intrac.org/wpcms/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Praxis-Paper-9-Civil-Society-Capacity-
Building-in-Post-Conflict-Societies-Bill-Sterland.pdf (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
74
https://eeca.unfpa.org/en/news/older-people-regularly-visiting-unfpa-supported-centres-live-healthier-
longer-lives-new-study (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
The United Nations Population Fund in Bosnia and
Herzegovina (UNFPA) and the NGO Partnership for
Public Health are working together to build the
capacity of the existing network of Centers for Healthy
Aging in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
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programmes. NGOs engaged in service provision are dominant, but only a few of them carry out work
aimed at influencing government policy or amending legislation.
There is no country strategy for cooperation between government and NGOs at either the state or
entity level. NGOs report that relations with municipal authorities are most productive and relevant
for their work
75
. In order to formalise cooperation between government and NGOs, a number of
advances have been made, driven by foreign actors such World Bank, Swiss Agency for Development
and Cooperation (SDC), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United States Agency for
International Development (USAID), etc.
NGOs in Bosnia and Herzegovina are organized into NGO networks based on geographical location or
interest. One example is Informal Network of NGOs for the Protection of the Rights of older people -
"FOR DIGNIFIED AGING"
76
.
According to abovementioned, the NGOs partners in Bosnia and Herzegovina are government
organisations at all levels (as mentioned in the answer to question 2), as well as international
organisations including:
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
77
:
United Nations Population Fund in B&H (UNFPA)
78
:
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
79
:
Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
80
:
World Bank
81
:
CARE International
82
:
Austrian Development Cooperation (ADC)
83
:
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC)
84
:
Regional Cooperation Council (RCC)
85
:
Research and academia working on SHAFE
Research and academia ecosystem
is responsibility of two Entities (i.e.
Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina
and Republika Srpska) and the
Brčko District. In Federation Bosnia
and Herzegovina, this responsibility
75
https://www.intrac.org/wpcms/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Praxis-Paper-9-Civil-Society-Capacity-
Building-in-Post-Conflict-Societies-Bill-Sterland.pdf (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
76
http://dostojanstvenostarenje.org/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
77
https://www.ba.undp.org/content/bosnia_and_herzegovina/en/home.html (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
78
https://ba.unfpa.org/en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
79
https://www.usaid.gov/bosnia (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
80
https://www.osce.org/mission-to-bosnia-and-herzegovina (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
81
https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/bosniaandherzegovina (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
82
https://www.care-international.org/where-we-work/bosnia-and-herzegovina (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
83
https://www.entwicklung.at/en/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
84
https://www.eda.admin.ch/deza/en/home/countries/bosnia-herzegovina.html (Accessed: 15 October,
2021)
85
https://www.rcc.int/flagships/3/human-capital (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
Informal Network of NGOs for the Protection of the
Rights of older people - "FOR DIGNIFIED AGING".
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is further delegated to ten Cantons. This leads to highly fragmented ecosystem consisting of several
management subsystems (i.e., the Cantons in Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina, the level of
Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina, the level of Republika Srpska, Brčko District, state level of Bosnia
and Herzegovina). At the state level, the responsibility for research and academia ecosystem is located
within the Department for Education, Science, Culture and Sport of the Ministry of Civil Affairs
86
. At
the entity level of Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina, the responsibility for research and academia
ecosystem is allocated to each of the ten Cantons which can delegate specific functions to the Federal
Ministry of Education and Science
87
, which is responsible for coordination among them. At the level
of Cantons, ministries of education and science are responsible for education and academia
ecosystem. There are ten ministries which size and capacity to perform functions differ from canton
to canton (Una-Sana Canton, Posavina Canton, Tuzla Canton, Zenica-Doboj Canton, Bosnian-Podrinje
Canton Gorazde, Central Bosnia Canton, Herzegovina-Neretva Canton, West Herzegovina Canton,
Sarajevo Canton, Canton 10). At the entity level of Republika Srpska, the responsibility for research
and academia ecosystem is allocated to Ministry for Science and Technology, Higher Education and
Informatics
88
. This Ministry is responsible for relevant policies, administrative and other expert tasks
related to science and research activities, incentive to basic and applied research, innovation,
development and improvement of technology, planning, preparation of programs and agreement on
scientific and technological cooperation, etc. In comparison to both Federation Bosnia and
Herzegovina and Republika Srpska, Brčko District has the smallest and the most concentrated model
of this sector. The responsibility for research and academia ecosystem is allocated to the Department
for Education within the District Government
89
.
According to abovementioned, partners of research and academia ecosystem are government
organisations at cantonal, entity, and state level, where the last one is responsible for coordination of
international activities through various programmes (e.g., Erasmus+
90
, Horizon 2020
91
, IPA, etc.),
projects, associations etc.
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE
The complex constitutional structure of Bosnia and Herzegovina has caused differences across the
country in relation to collection of funds, distribution mechanisms, budgeting procedures, and
development of specific financial schemes.
SHAFE can be funded from the budgets of various government levels (the State, the Entities, the
Cantons, Brčko District, and municipalities) that contribute in various proportions. The following
government organisations could finance the SHAFE at:
The state level:
- Ministry of Civil Affairs
- Ministry of Human Rights and Refugees
- Ministry of Communications and Transport
86
www.mcp.gov.ba (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
87
www.fmon.gov.ba (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
88
www.vladars.net (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
89
http://www.vlada.bdcentral.net/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
90
www.erasmusbih.com/index.php (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
91
https://ec.europa.eu/info/research-and-innovation/strategy/international-cooperation/bosnia-and-
herzegovina_en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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The entity levels:
- Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina
o Ministry of Labour and Social Policy, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education and Science,
Ministry of Development, Entrepreneurship and Crafts, Ministry of Spatial Planning
- Republika Srpska
o Ministry for Health and Social Welfare, Ministry for Science and Technology, Higher Education and
Information Society, Ministry for Labour, Veterans and Disability Protection, Ministry for the
Economy and Entrepreneurship, Ministry of Physical Planning, Construction and Ecology
The state level of government deals with the coordination of international projects towards the two
entities and Brčko District. These can be European Union (EU) assistance programs through Instrument
for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) funds and relevant international organisations, embassies, etc.
The entity level of government has the most significant competence, as well as available funds to
support SHAFE. The abovementioned ministries on the entity level have the best opportunity to plan
and allocate domestic budget to address certain SHAFE issues.
Additionally, there are increasing opportunities for small scale funding from municipal or cantonal
level of governments, membership subscriptions, fees for services, charitable giving in the community,
etc. This assistance is rarely planned and criteria and distribution mechanisms vary from case to case,
which produces inequality across the country.
Despite all levels of government are active in supporting SHAFE through some kind of grant aid,
funding is highly dependent on international organisations being the foreign supporters as described
below.
International organisations (Examples of foreign donors)
World Bank
92
:
o Finances the “Health Sector Enhancement Project (HSEP)” in order to repair, reconstruct and
furnish the primary healthcare facilities with the aim to improve the family medicine model.
o Finances the “Reducing Health Risk Factors in B&H” project, which aims to reduce the risk factors
of non-communicable diseases.
United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
93
:
o Support the opening of Centres of Healthy Aging in cooperation with Federal Ministry of Health in
order ensure healthy ageing and protect mental health and physical activity. (It also supports the
“Sexual and Reproductive Health” programme in order to strength the capacities of
governments to provide integrated sexual and reproductive health services with a focus on
vulnerable populations.)
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC)
94
:
o Finances the project of “Strengthening of Nursing in B&H”, where one of the activities is
establishment of the polyvalent patronage nurse (PNN) service that is important for providing
the services for the seniors and long-term care.
92
https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/bosniaandherzegovina (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
93
https://www.unfpa.org/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
94
https://www.eda.admin.ch/deza/en/home/countries/bosnia-herzegovina.html (Accessed: 15 October,
2021)
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o Finances the project “Mental Health Project in B&H”, which focuses on improvement of
capacities of the competent institutions in order to improve the mental health of the entire
population.
World Health Organisation/ Europe Office:
o Implements the project of “Strengthening and Advancing Modern and Sustainable Public Health
Strategies, capacities and services to improve population health in B&H” in order to reduce
burdens with non-communicable diseases and ensure better health outcome for the B&H
population.
Examples of relevant business models, sustainability means and strategies to address and
implement SHAFE
Below are listed activities being performed in different domains to contribute to the implementation
of SHAFE in Bosnia and Herzegovina
95
.
Lifelong learning
The Ministry of Civil Affairs of B&H
96
works on establishment of basic
principles, coordination and
harmonisation of the plans of entity-
level authorities and definitions of
strategies at the international level.
At the state level, the following
documents have been adopted in the
field of lifelong learning:
1. “Principles and Standards in the field of Adult Education in B&H”, which presents a legal basis
for the action of educational and other authorities at all levels of government in Bosnia and
Herzegovina. The principles and standards defined in this document determine the principles
and standards for building, developing, implementing and coordinating the policies and
legislation that govern the field of adult education in Bosnia and Herzegovina and for
monitoring, evaluating and analysing the state of play in this field.
2. “Strategic Platform for Development of Adult Education in the Lifelong Learning Context in
B&H, for the period 2014-2020”, which presents a legal framework and basis for the action
and cooperation of the authorities at all levels of government in B&H with the aim to adopt
and fully implement the necessary strategic and/or development documents regarding adult
education.
3. “Action Plan for the Development and Implementation of the Qualifications Framework for
Adult Education in B&H for the period 2014 -2020”, which represents a plan for key activities
for the development and implementation of the qualification’s framework in Bosnia and
Herzegovina.
Living conditions
95
https://unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/pau/age/country_rpts/2017/BIH_report.pdf (Accessed: 15 October,
2021)
96
Source: www.mcp.gov.ba (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
Projects of the foreign donors relevant for the SHAFE
ecosystem to ensure healthy ageing, to protect mental
health, to strengthen nursing services, improve mental
health and to reduce risk factors.
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According to the Law on Urban Planning and Construction published Official Gazette of Republika
Srpska, 40/13, the Rulebook was enacted on the requirements for planning and designing facilities for
free movement of children and persons with reduced physical capacities. This Rulebook refers not
only to old persons, but it determines access to buildings, designing of buildings, planning of the spaces
of public roads and pedestrian areas, etc.
Social inclusion
The Central Election Commission of B&H
97
enacts regulations that determine the way and procedure
of developing the part form the Central Voters Register for voters who are tied to their home due to
old age, illness or disability. These guidelines prepared as inclusion measure for vulnerable groups for
elections in B&H focus on “target groups within a target group” (e.g., in the target group of women,
the focus should be on older women).
Social policy
At the state level, there is no common social policy. The Ministry of Civil Affairs of B&H coordinates
the activities in the field of social policy and coordination with relevant entity authorities. This Ministry
of coordinated the project “Support to the Social Service Providers and Enhancement of the
Monitoring Capacities” (EU SOCEM 2015 - 2017) with the aim to improve the social protection of
socially vulnerable groups, and improve monitoring, reporting and promoting human rights. The
project was financed by the EU in B&H and implemented in the social welfare services in 12
municipalities in Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina and Republika Srpska.
Mental Health
Within the Ministry of Civil Affairs of B&H, the Regional Health Development centre on Mental Health
in South East Europe (SEE) operate as part of the South East Europe Health Network (SEEHN)
98
. This
centre has contributed to the improvement of reforms in mental health in the region (including B&H)
by following international guidelines and documents.
6. Bulgaria
Contributors: Mariyana Lyubenova, Alexandre Chikalanow
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
Research in Bulgaria focused on several categories, studying in further details the demographic
composition of the country, including predictions for the next 30 years; the quality of life of older
people, particularly in comparison to other European citizens, the pension system and its progression
over time; the economic development of the country; the capabilities and limitations of the healthcare
system; the logistics behind the National Health Insurance and the main Private Insurance companies
currently on the market, as well as Patronages and Charities which also attend to the needs of the
elders.
Based on the findings of this analysis, we can deduce that the country is facing the same difficulties
regarding its ageing population as other members of the Union and can benefit from solutions which
aim to improve the quality of life of its citizens and focus significantly on preventative healthcare and
healthy lifestyle, as this is particularly not prevalent in Bulgaria, where the policies of the country, and
97
https://www.izbori.ba/Default.aspx?Lang=6 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
98
http://seehn.org/bosnia-herzegovina/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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the spending of the National Health Insurance are not driven in the direction of pre-care, but rather
entirely directed towards treatment of chronic illnesses and other diseases (post-care).
Due to the economic hardships the country has been through since World War II, many of the public
hospitals and clinics are not maintained well and lack the funds to invest in digitalisation, which
restricts the sharing of data and the communication with older people, who are also not as tech savvy
as some of their western contemporaries.
This is why such digital solutions, though incredibly needed, might be slow to get established on the
market and older people could require additional time to get used to and acquainted with, the various
proposed devices. Furthermore, the financial limitations and low spending power of the citizens allows
only for the most cost effective services, if they are to be sustainable long term, which is why, based
on this study, it is recommended that the project rolls out simple (basic) and very affordable solutions
at first, until trust is gained and consciousness is shaped more in line with the preventative efforts
AgeWare is focused on, and more information becomes available on the use of digitalisation to
prolong longevity. As each generation becomes more comfortable with navigating new technology,
such solutions are expected to pick up speed and become more popular, especially if they focus on
providing accurate and reliable data and work on building a brand which inspires trust and confidence
in the community.
1.1 Participation of older people in the population and life expectancy
The current population of Bulgaria is 6 882 242according to last population census at 2021
99
Average life expectancy both genders 75.3 females 79.1 males 72.1
100
55-64: 13.15% (male 433,943 /female 482,784)
65 years and over: 20.06% (male 562,513 /female 835,065) (2020 est.)
101
1.2 Retirement age
For retirement in 2021, women need to be aged 61 years and 8 months to have a period of social
insurance cover of 36 years. For men the age is 64 years and 4 months and a period of social insurance
cover of 39 years.
102
1.3 Insurance
National insurance contributions
National insurance contributions include social security and health insurance contributions.
The aggregate rate of social security contributions is 24.7% to 25.4%, of which 14.12% to 14.82% is
payable by the employer and 10.58% is payable by the employee.
The aggregate rate of health insurance contributions is 8%, of which 4.8% is payable by the employer
and 3.2% is payable by the employee.
The total national insurance contribution rate (social security and health insurance) is 32.7% to 33.4,
of which 18.92% to 19.62% is payable by the employer and 13.78% is payable by the employee.
The above rates are applicable to Bulgarian nationals, as well as to EU/EEA nationals who are subject
to Bulgarian social security contributions (i.e. who have not obtained a E101/A1 certificate of coverage
issued from their home country social security authorities). Non-EU/EEA nationals are also subject to
these contributions under certain conditions, except for health insurance contributions. If they have
a permanent residence permit for Bulgaria, they will be subject to health insurance contributions, too.
The minimum monthly insurance base for freelancers is BGN 650 for 2021. The maximum monthly
insurance base for freelancers is BGN 3,000 for 2021.
For individuals working under employment agreements or as managers or controllers of companies,
the minimum insurance base depends on the economic activity of the insurer as well as on the
99
https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/bulgaria-population/
100
https://www.worldometers.info/demographics/bulgaria-demographics/
101
https://countrymeters.info/bg/Bulgaria
102
https://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=1103&langId=en&intPageId=4437
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profession and grade of the insured person. The minimum base varies between BGN 650 and BGN
1,763. The maximum monthly insurance base is limited to BGN 3,000.
103
1.4 Insurance pillars
In 2000 the foundations were laid of the three-pillar pension insurance system in Bulgaria. The three-
pillar system combines the advantages of the pay-as-you-go system (the state system of pension
insurance 1st pillar) and the capital-based systems (Supplementary Mandatory 2nd pillar,
operating through the universal and professional funds, and the supplementary voluntary pension
insurance 3rd pillar).
To the state social security system (1st pillar), supplementary mandatory pension insurance was added
the 2nd pillar - supplementary mandatory insurance, that works through the universal and
professional pension fund. The supplementary voluntary pension insurance (3rd pillar) functions
through voluntary pension funds. Thus, in addition to the state pension you can get a pension from
the funds for supplementary pension insurance and pensions, based on the capital principle
104
.
1.4.1 State Social Security
Pillar 1 of the pension system is managed by the state. The Budget of the State Social Security is
determined by the State Social Security Budget Act and is in force for one calendar year (from January
1st to December 31st). In the Act, the budgets of the several funds - “Pensions”, "Pensions Unrelated
to Work", “Accidents at Work and Occupational Diseases”, “General Disease and Maternity” and
“Unemployment” - are specified. The overall amount of the insurance contributions for insured
employees in 3rd category of labour for all insurance risks is 22.3% of the social security income (for
persons born before 01.01.1960), and 17.3% for those born after this date, since 5% of their insurable
income is directed to supplementary mandatory pension insurance.
105
1.4.2 Supplementary mandatory pension insurance
Pillar 2 supplementary mandatory pension insurance was set up to provide a second pension in
addition to the pension for the State Social Security.
The second pillar works through universal and/ or professional pension funds, which are set up and
managed by private pension insurance companies. The insurance contributions are determined by
law and are collected together with the insurance contributions for the state social security
106
1.4.2 Supplementary Voluntary Pension Insurance (SVPF)
Pillar 3 of the pension insurance system in Bulgaria is a voluntary form of pension insurance. It is an
option for a third, additional pension. Contributions to a voluntary pension fund will help you
accumulate amounts in an account of your own. If you add the third pillar to the other two pillars you
are free to dream about the things you want for yourself after retirement.
Supplementary voluntary insurance works on a capital principle. If you are 16 and over, you can insure
yourself or be insured. Insurance may be individual, by an employer, or to the benefit of a third party.
103
https://taxsummaries.pwc.com/bulgaria/individual/other-taxes
104
https://www.nnbulgaria.com/en/pension-insurance/pension-insurance-system (Accessed: 15 October,
2021)
105
https://www.nnbulgaria.com/en/pension-insurance/pension-insurance-system/pillar1 (Accessed: 15
October, 2021)
106
https://www.nnbulgaria.com/en/pension-insurance/pension-insurance-system/pillar2 (Accessed: 15
October, 2021)
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Just like the mandatory voluntary insurance, the amount of the pension mostly depends on the
amount of the funds accumulated on the individual account of the insured person
107
1.5 Support organisations
1.5.1 Red cross
Red Cross Bulgaria is a “humanitarian volunteer organisation, working according to its Statutes and
the principles of the International Red Cross Movement, committed to providing support to vulnerable
people victims of crisis and disasters in order to improve their life and dignity and relieve their
suffering.”
108
1.5.2 Charities
Red Cross Bulgaria is a “humanitarian volunteer organisation, working according to its Statutes and
the principles of the International Red Cross Movement, committed to providing support to vulnerable
people victims of crisis and disasters in order to improve their life and dignity and relieve their
suffering.”
109
1.5.3 Private Patronage
Private Patronage is a new service, offered for the first time, to help older people in Sofia and the
surrounding area. It includes delivery of a lunch menu, or a lunch and evening menu to the home.
Private patronage helps people who, for social or health reasons, cannot afford fresh food every day.
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Bulgaria
Local
Regional
National
Health
Hospitals, Clinics,
four medical universities Sofia,
Plovdiv, Varna and Pleven. One
medical faculty in Sofia University.
28 Regional Health
Inspectorates
Ministry of Health110
Regional Health
Inspectorates111
Social
Municipalities Social Patronage
28 Regional Agencies
for Social Assistance
Ministry of Labour and
Social Policy 112
Agency for People with
Disabilities113
Built
environment
Municipalities, Local government
units, local developers and
construction companies, local
public and private houses for aging
persons.
28 Regional
Development
Agencies
Ministry of Regional
Development and Public
Works 114
107
https://www.nnbulgaria.com/en/pension-insurance/pension-insurance-system (Accessed: 15 October,
2021)
108
https://www.redcross.bg (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
109
http://patronaj.net (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
110
https://www.mh.government.bg/ / (Accessed: 15 October, 2021
111
https://www.mh.government.bg/en/ministry/secondary-authorizing-officers/regional-health-
inspectorates/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
112
https://www.mlsp.government.bg/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
113
http://ahu.mlsp.government.bg/home/
114
https://www.mrrb.bg/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Digitalisation
Municipalities, local government
units, private IT companies
28 Regional MTITC
Agencies
Ministry of Transport,
Information Technology
and Communications
MTITC115
Ministry of Education and
Science
Development
Municipalities, local government
units, local private companies
28 Regional
Development
Agencies
Ministry of Regional
Development and Public
Works116
Ministry of Economy117
Education
Municipalities, local government
units, local and public and private
schools and universities
28 Regional
inspectorates of
Ministry of Education
and Science
Ministry of Education and
Science118
Research
Municipalities, local and state
Universities,
28 Regional
inspectorates of
Ministry of Education
and Science
Ministry of Education and
Science119
Bulgarian Academy of
Science120
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE you are involved in your country
List of relevant international projects, where we have participated or currently participate:
FP7 ICT “Experiential Living Labs for the Internet of Things” – ELLIOT.
H2020 ACTIVEAGE: ACTivating InnoVative IoT smart living environments for AGEing well
(SofiaPilot)
121
, AgeWare
H2020 Cross4Health project (cross4health.eu).
H2020 BOWI: Boosting Digital Innovation in Europe (bowi-network.eu), BOWI - AgeWare.
7. Croatia
Contributors: dr. Andrej Grgurić, andrej.grguric@ericsson.com; Hrvoje Belani, hrvoje.belani@miz.hr;
dr. Vanja Vasiljev, vanjav@uniri.hr; Igor Ljubi, igor.ljubi@racunarstvo.hr; Marija Džida,
marija.dzida@pilar.hr.
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
NATIONAL:
The National Council for the Retirees and older people has been an advisory body for a number of
years in Croatia. Through the National Council for the Retirees and older people, senior persons are
able to be included in creating and evaluating age-related policies.
Legislative and policy framework in place in Croatia:
Social Welfare Act (Official Gazette (hereinafter: OG) 157/13, 152/14, 99/15, 52/16, 16/17,
130/17),
Health Care Act (OG 100/18),
115
https://www.mtitc.government.bg/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
116
https://www.mrrb.bg/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
117
https://www.mi.government.bg/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
118
https://www.mon.bg/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
119
Ibidem
120
Ibidem
121
www.activageproject.eu (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Compulsory Health Insurance Act (OG 80/13, 137/13),
Act on Protection of Persons with Mental Disabilities (OG 76/14),
Act on the Croatian Register of Persons with Disabilities (OG 64/11)
Professional Rehabilitation and Employment of Persons with Disabilities Act (OG 157/13,
152/14, 39/18),
Ombudsperson for Persons with Disabilities Act (OG 107/07),
Ombudsperson Act (OG 76/12),
National Strategy for Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities 2017 2020
(OG 42/17),
Social Welfare Strategy for older people in the Republic of Croatia for the period 2017 2020
The Anti-Discrimination Act was adopted (OG 85/08, 112/12). There are no different regulations or
practices related to the age of persons with disabilities in Croatia. Persons with disabilities are not
divided according to age groups but according to the degree of functional impairment; hence, there
is no difference in treatment of the older people with disabilities compared to other age groups.
The Register of Persons with Disabilities of the Croatian Institute for Public Health on March 4, 2019,
contained the following records: 247,772 adults (65+) of which 131,993 (53%) of male and 115,789
(47%) of female sex.
191,509 older persons with disability (65+) were certificated in the Croatian Pension Insurance
Institute and are entitled to some of disability rights from that field.
According to the processed data of the Register and the Reference Centre of the Croatian Ministry of
Health for the Protection of the Health of older people, in the year 2016 there were 511,064 persons
with disabilities, 42.6% of them of age 65 and over. Of the 217,841 older persons with disabilities,
49.7%, were in the early old age (65-74 years) 35.7%, in middle old age (75-84 years) and 14.6% in the
deep old age (85 and over).
The Croatian Health Insurance Institute (hereinafter: CHII), compliant to Compulsory Health Insurance
Act conducts and regulates compulsory health care insurance.
Under the conditions prescribed by the Social Welfare Act, persons with disabilities and older people
can also acquire other rights from the social welfare system that are not necessarily related to the
health condition of the person.
The National Program on Palliative
Care Development in Croatia 2017-
2020 (hereinafter: National
Program), adopted by the
Government of the Republic of
Croatia (hereinafter: GoC) on 18
October 2017, includes activities for
the further development of
palliative care systems according to
established palliative care needs, in
accordance with the White paper on
standards and norms for palliative
care in Europe, with the further
establishment of organisational
Ministry dealing with Family and Social Policy provides
various support services, such as:
-providing community-based housing (more than 1,000
service users included),
-assistance at home, personal assistant (over 1,700
users of service, including people over the age of 65),
-a sign language interpreter (employing 80 interpreters
of the sign language who provide service to older
people with hearing impairment),
-assistant with healthy vision (35.5 assistants employed
who provide service to older people over 65 years, as
well).
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forms and mutual linking of palliative care stakeholders, continuing palliative care education, adopting
national guidelines and recommendations for palliative care provision and development, and
suggestions for improving palliative care for patients and their families.
REGIONAL and LOCAL:
According to the Social Welfare Act local and regional self-government units are obliged to
participate in the social welfare of the population in their area in accordance with their financial
and other possibilities. Each local and regional self-government unit issues its own general
regulations on social welfare in a way that autonomously defines priorities in its jurisdiction.
In October 2020 in Zagreb the 2020-2024 Strategy for Improving the Quality of Life for Older
Persons was presented: “The 30-measure strategy, which was presented on the occasion of
the International Day of Older Persons, observed on 1 October, will be implemented in six fields:
social protection, healthcare, lifelong learning, various aspects of free time, human rights, and civil
society, said Romana Galic, the head of the city department for social protection and persons with
disabilities.”
122
Local government units establish gerontology centres (usually in the homes for older people), in
which non-institutional or daily care for older people, including those with disabilities, is
organized.
Reference Centre of the Croatian Ministry of Health for the Protection of the Health of older
people has started educating the formal and informal caregivers for persons suffering from
Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia (dementia is becoming more and more common
form of disability and is a major burden for the affected families).
In the homes for older people, a program of 4 levels of geriatric health care is implemented, which
enables the categorization of individual gerontology of insured person with the implementation
of measures and procedures and activities.
A mobile gerontology-dental team was established in the City of Zagreb to improve the availability
of oral health care for elderly.
The Economics of Ageing in Croatia, University of Zagreb Faculty of Economics and Business
123
:
Legal Protection of Older Persons (Including Older people with Mental Disorders) From the
Croatian Perspective: Why We Need a Special UN Convention on The Rights of The Older Persons:
o S. Roksandić Vidlička i S. Šikoronja, "PRAVNA ZAŠTITA STARIJIH OSOBA, OSOBITO S
DUŠEVNIM SMETNJAMA, IZ HRVATSKE PERSPEKTIVE: ZAŠTO NAM JE POTREBNA
KONVENCIJA UN-A O PRAVIMA STARIJIH OSOBA", Zbornik Pravnog fakulteta Sveučilišta u
Rijeci, vol.38, br. 3, str. 1101-1129, 2017. [Online]
124
.
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
+
+
+
Social
+
+
+
Built environment
+
+
+
Digitalisation
+
+
122
https://www.total-croatia-news.com/news/47052-older-persons (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
123
https://www.efzg.unizg.hr/UserDocsImages/MGR/ssmolic/ESTARENJA/brosura_eng_preview_03-12-
2014.pdf
124
https://doi.org/10.30925/zpfsr.38.3.7 (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Development
+
Education
+
+
Research
+
Other: please specify
Other: please specify
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner NA
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE. EUROPEAN FUNDS FOR CROATIAN
PROJECTS
Examples of relevant business models, and sustainability means; Activities to address and
implement SHAFE; Strategies
8. Cyprus
Contributor: Dr. Areti Efthymiou
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
The eHealth activities are in an early stage in Cyprus. Usually, they are developed as part of
research initiatives by universities and private sector.
In 2015 the eHealth legislation was approved by the Cypriot government. In 2019 the
government established the national eHealth authority (Chair: Christos Schizas,
schizas@ucy.ac.cy)
In an early stage, as a public initiative towards this domain, the electronic medical record
system was tested at the Nicosia and Famagusta General Hospitals and there is a plan for an
organised digital system to monitor hospital internal processes and regional eHealth
networks: including aspects of telemedicine, smart homes, and ambient assisted living
services.
In the same framework, two municipalities in Cyprus have initiated the process to be part of
the healthy cities network
125
, but still the process is not completed.
Many projects are part of academic initiatives and only a handful of cases are focusing on
older adults:
o TILEPROMITHEAS Transforming care for those in intensive care units (Dr Theodoros
Kyprianou, kyprianou.t@unic.ac.cy
o SHAPES_Smart and Healthy Ageing through People Engaging in Supportive Systems (University
of Nicosia- research foundation (Andreas Andreou (UNRF), Constandinos X. Mavromoustakis
(UNRF)
o Cherries responsible Healthcare Ecosystems- Open call for Cyprus (Mr. Moyses Moyseos
(EUBIC CyRIC): m.moyseos@cyric.eu)
o Centre of excellence
HealthXR (Dr Maria Matsangidou, matsangidou.m@gmail.com)
o eHealth Lab University of Cyprus (Constantinos Patichis pattichi@cs.ucy.ac.cy, Christos
Schizas, schizas@ucy.ac.cy
Integrated National eHealth Ecosystem
125
healthy cities network (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Long Lasting Memories (Dr Marios Neofytou mneoph@cs.ucy.ac.cy)
At the moment, there are no public eHealth services targeting older adults or Smart Healthy Age-
Friendly Environments in Cyprus.
Types of services for older adults are:
1) The multipurpose centre in Nicosia
provides activities for older adults e.g.,
home care, transportation, breakfast, coffee
and lunch, physiotherapy and exercise, art
courses, lectures, cooking, health
assessment (sensory tests), excursions and
consultation
126
2) day centres (social welfare services)
3) nursing homes (social welfare services)
4) home care (social welfare services)
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
Ministry of Health
Social
Ministry of Labour, welfare and social insurance
Built
environment
Ministry of Internal affairs- construction
department
Digitalisation
University departments
eHealth Lab
Cyprus Neuroscience and
Technological Institute
Ministry of Health
National eHealth Authority
Development
Ministry of Energy commerce and industry
Education
Ministry
Research
University departments
Directorate General for European Programmes,
coordination and development
Research and Innovation Foundation
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner: N/A
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE
o Cherries responsible Healthcare Ecosystems- Open call for Cyprus (Mr. Moyses Moyseos (EUBIC
CyRIC): m.moyseos@cyric.eu)
o https://www.research.org.cy (New funding programmes for Research and Innovation with a
budget of €15 million- Press release 15 April 2021)
Horizon
AAL (Iria Loukaidou, iloucaidou@research.org.cy)
o https://www.erasmusplus.cy/IDEP-Dia-Biou-Mathisis (ΙΔΕΠ)
o Directorate of European Investment funds
127
Examples of relevant business models, and sustainability means
126
https://www.nicosia.org.cy/el-GR/municipality/multipurpose-centre/ (Katerina Koni,
Katerina.Koni@nicosiamunicipality.org.cy
127
https://www.fundingprogrammesportal.gov.cy/easyconsole.cfm/page/progsearch/rand/0.620599258747 (Accessed: 15
October, 2021)
Working document summarizing the area of assistive
technologies and the possibilities of their use in social,
health and informal care systems (Pracovní dokument
shrnující oblast asistivních technologií a možností jejich
využití v systémech sociálních, zdravotních a v systému
neformální péče).
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Activities to address and implement SHAFE Strategies
9. Czech Republic
Contributors: Lenka Lhotská, Lucie Vidovićová
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
Digital Czech: In its Resolution No 629 of 3 October 2018, the Czech Government approved the cross-
sectional strategic document Digital Czech Republic, which deals with all the effects of digitization on
the economy and society. It is a set of concepts that create the conditions for the long-term prosperity
of the Czech Republic. Its content can be defined as follows: “Strategy of Coordinated and
Comprehensive Digitization of the Czech Republic 2018+”. “Digital Czech Republic” covers three pillars
(partial strategies) that form one logical unit. It covers areas ranging from the interaction of the Czech
Republic in the European Union in the digital agenda, through digital public administration to the
preparation and interaction of the Czech Republic’s society and economy for digitization
128
.
Policies in the making:
Working document summarizing the area of assistive technologies and the possibilities of their use in
social, health and informal care systems (Pracovní dokument shrnující oblast asistivních technologií a
možností jejich využití v systémech sociálních, zdravotních a v systému neformální péče)
129
.
Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs Preparation for Ageing
130
an expected strategy for 2021 2025
(not published yet).
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
Local
Regional
National
Health
general practitioners
regional governments,
hospitals; senior advocacy groups
Ministry of Health
Social
social services
municipalities
regional governments,
NGOs, senior advocacy groups
Ministry of Labour and
Social Affairs
Built
environment
municipalities
regional governments
Prague Institute of Planning and
Development (and similar in
other big cities)
Ministry of Labour and
Social Affairs
Ministry of Regional
Development
Digitalisation
municipalities
senior advocacy groups
Ministry of Industry and
Trade
Development
municipalities
regional governments
Ministry of Regional
Development
Education
schools (primary,
secondary), senior
advocacy groups
universities,
senior advocacy groups
Ministry of Education,
Youth and Sports,
universities
Research
municipalities
Universities
Technological Agency
(TAČR),
universities,
Academy of Sciences
128
https://www.mpo.cz/en/business/digital-society/digital-czech-republic--243601 (Accessed: 15 October,
2021)
129
http://www.podporaprocesu.cz/pracovni-dokument-shrnujici-oblast-asistivnich-technologii-a-moznosti-
jejich-vyuziti-v-systemech-socialnich-zdravotnich-a-v-systemu-neformalni-pece/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
130
https://www.mpsv.cz/seniori-a-politika-starnuti (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Business
local start-ups and SMEs
& companies
local start-ups and SMEs
Companies
(National, regional, local) ecosystem on SHAFE of the partner
The Voice of Rare Disease Patients in Europe the Czech Republic
131
ECHAlliance
132
: ECHAlliance Ecosystems are geographically focused, permanent, multi-
stakeholder partnerships committed to break down silos, transform health and social care and
create economic growth. For the last ten years with the support of the European Commission,
we’ve developed a methodology and approach on how to set up and manage and connect
ecosystems in 55+ global locations.
The Czech Republic representation
133
(National, regional, local) funding opportunities on SHAFE
Technologická agentura ČR (TAČR) - funding agency for the cooperative projects
134
Czech Health Research Council @ Ministry of Health
135
Operational programs, EU Funds - Operační programy
136
Ministry of Industry and Trade funding opportunities:
https://www.mpo.cz/cz/podnikani/dotace-a-podpora-podnikani/
https://www.mpo.cz/cz/podnikani/dotace-a-podpora-podnikani/optak-2021-2027/
Examples of relevant business models, and sustainability means
Activities to address and implement SHAFE
Life90 / Gerontological Institute (Život 90) a regional and local community centre, providing various
types of services, educational and cultural activities and respite care. They are pioneers in the
provision of emergency red button for older adults supported by the 24/7 telephone support and
supervision. Via their Gerontological Institute they are involved in various types of senior advocacy
and policy lobbing. In cooperation with the Masaryk University and Czech Technical University in
Prague CIIRC they are testing the humanoid robot Pepper for the community usage and active ageing
support
137
.
10. Denmark
Contributor: Sonja Hansen
(National, regional, local) policies on Smart Healthy Age-Friendly Environments
Assisted Living Technology (Velfærdsteknologi & Hjælpemidler)
138
Smart Aarhus Smart Aarhus (English)
139
131
https://www.eurordis.org/member_search?country=Czech+Republic (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
132
https://echalliance.com/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
133
https://echalliance.com/?s=czech+republic (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
134
www.tacr.cz (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
135
http://www.azvcr.cz/en (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
136
https://www.esfcr.cz/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
137
www.zivot90.cz (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
138
www.velfaerdsteknologi-aarhus.dk/english (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
139
https://smartaarhuseu.aarhus.dk/ (Accessed: 15 October, 2021)
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Local Government Denmark English (kl.dk)
140
Ministry for Health www.sst.dk Health and wellbeing a good life
141
Senior Housing Seniorboliger - OK-Fonden
142
Relevant stakeholders and policy makers
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:
LOCAL
REGIONAL
NATIONAL
HEALTH
x
X
x
SOCIAL
x
X
BUILT ENVIRONMENT