Article

Mourning Madeleine and Margaret: Dress and Meaning in the Memorials for Two Scottish Queens, 1537 and 1541

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

While the Scottish royal household participated in the wider development of mourning traditions in the late fifteenth century and employed mourning dress as a political tool from at least the turn of the sixteenth century, surviving evidence is extremely limited. Records for the funerals of Queens Madeleine de Valois ( d. 1537) and Margaret Tudor ( d. 1541) yield the earliest extensive material details for the employment of mourning displays in Scotland. These two funerals both honoured foreign-born queens, they took place only four years apart and they were organised within the same household—yet their use of mourning dress and material display diverged notably. Variations in the design and display of both formal and everyday mourning dress were used to transmit distinct messages and themes, in order to address the particular political circumstances and needs of each death. Comparison between the details of these Scottish funerals and examples from England, France and the Low Countries helps to place Scottish practice within wider traditions and highlights a common emphasis on mourning displays as a central aspect of political discourse and diplomacy at key moments of change and loss.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Iconography and literature in the service of diplomacy: the Franco-Scottish alliance, James V and Scotland's two French queens, Madeleine of France and Marie de Guise
  • Dana Bentley-Cranch
  • R K Marshall
Dana Bentley-Cranch and R. K. Marshall, 'Iconography and literature in the service of diplomacy: the Franco-Scottish alliance, James V and Scotland's two French queens, Madeleine of France and Marie de Guise', in J. H. Williams (ed.), Stewart Style, 1513-1542: Essays on the court of James V (East Linton, 1996), 273-88, at 283;
A Burgundian funeral ceremony: Olivier de la Marche and the obsequies of Adolf of Cleves, lord of Ravenstein
For an additional corresponding description of weepers' dress in the Low Countries, see Malcolm Vale, 'A Burgundian funeral ceremony: Olivier de la Marche and the obsequies of Adolf of Cleves, lord of Ravenstein', English Historical Review 111:443 (1996) 920-38, at 929.
Éléonore de Poitiers
  • Paviot
Paviot, 'Éléonore de Poitiers', 114.