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Data-Driven Decisions: Using Network Analysis to Guide Campus Course Offerings

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Abstract

The spread of COVID-19 has caused major disruptions in the higher education space, and colleges and universities faced difficult decisions on how to reopen their campuses. At Indiana University Bloomington, student exposure to other students was reduced by leveraging the existing academic calendar and strategically managing course enrollment networks. The university used network analysis to measure student-to-student contact based on in-person student enrollments in a course. Researchers shared metrics of student-to-student contact under various instruction mode scenarios with decision-makers as they were in the process of reconfiguring instructional spaces and responding to guidelines from health officials during COVID-19. This article provides evidence supporting effective decision-making and reliance on data.

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A very small world': How data on student enrollment could help colleges stop coronavirus's spread. The Chronicle of Higher Education
  • N Gluckman
Gluckman, N. 2020. 'A very small world': How data on student enrollment could help colleges stop coronavirus's spread. The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 17. Available at: <chronicle.com/article/a-very-small-worldhow-data-on-student-enrollment-couldhelp-colleges-stop-coronaviruss-spread/>.