Article

The development of power take-off technology in wave energy converter systems: A Review

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Abstract

Utilizing ocean wave energy as a renewable energy source has become the object of rapid research. Energy conversion technology continues to evolve to seek more efficient, cheaper forms of investment, operation, and maintenance and are environmentally friendly. The converter type and PTO hold the key to the efficiency of the whole system. This literature review paper examines various general concepts and innovations of wave activated body converters and commonly used and innovative power take-off systems with a focus on controlling efforts in maximizing the generated power, challenges and efforts to develop a PTO control system as well as various research conducted by various parties.

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