Conference Paper

A Domain-Specific Language for Product-Process-Resource Modeling

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Abstract

Cyber-Physical Production Systems (CPPSs) are envisioned as next-generation adaptive production systems combining modern production techniques with the latest information technology. In CPPS engineering, basic planners define the functional relations between Product-Process-Resource (PPR) views to specify valid production process and resource designs that fulfill the customer requirements. Using the Formalised Process Description standard (VDI 3682) allows to visually model thesePPR views but is hard to process by machines and insufficiently defined formally. In this paper, we present the design of a Domain Specific Language (DSL), the PPR DSL, to effectively and efficiently represent PPR aspects and evaluate constraints defined for these aspects. We illustrate the PPR DSL with the use case rocker switch, abstracted from an industrial use case. We identify requirements and iteratively design and evaluate the PPR DSL. We show that the PPR DSL can model (a) the functional view of CPPSs and (b) define and efficiently evaluate constraints of a CPPS using technologies well-established in industry. We argue that the PPR DSL provides a valuable contribution for the community and industry to describe PPR aspects and evaluate constraints on these aspects. This way, PPR model can be defined and evaluated more easily for researchers and/or practitioners.

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... An integrated MDEG provides analysis capabilities, e.g., to investigate engineering data inconsistencies and logical constraints. For better illustration we present the Rocker Switch [4] use case elicited with our industry partner. The use case presents the assembly process of a rocker switch, its input & output products and related resources with sub-hierarchies visualised in a PPR network. ...
... Graph analysis can be conducted by the provided graph query language. Fig. 1 depicts an excerpt of an engineering graph based on the industrial use case Rocker Switch [4]. In addition to the PPR information of the use case analysis, aspects such as skills [3], requirements and assets are shown to motivate the potential of an MDEG. ...
... Fig. 1 is divided into four sections: (1) Product & Process (2) Skills (3) CPPS Resources and (4) Assets. The underlying PPR network is organised in the sections (1) and (3) and designed using a Domain-specific language (DSL), the PPR DSL [4]. The figure depicts products of the PPR network as a circle, processes as an rectangle and resources as a small rectangle with round corners. ...
Conference Paper
Industry 4.0 envisions adaptive production systems,i.e.,Cyber-Physical Production Systems (CPPSs), to manufacture products from a product line. Product-Process-Resource modeling represents the essential aspects of a CPPS. However,due to discipline-specific models, e.g., mechanical, electrical, and automation models, it is often unclear how to integrate the proprietary data into an integrated model due to missing common understanding. This paper investigates (i) how to integrate local engineering views with Common Concepts (CCs) and using them as a defined taxonomy for modeling a network of engineering concepts; (ii) how to build an engineering network graph for visualisation and analysis considering discipline-specific needs. We motivate a method to support CPPS engineering organisations to integrate their heterogeneous data using CCs. This builds the basis for defining multi-domain engineering graphs for visualisation and analysis aspects. In this paper, we present a research agenda discussing open issues and expected results.
... The case studies are represented universally in the PPR DSL [16] as CPPS engineering artifact. The PPR DSL was created to represent the functional view on CPPSs including system variants. ...
... To plan a CPPS, engineers first design its functional model using Product-Process-Resource (PPR) concepts including different variants. Therefore, Meixner et al. [16] designed the PPR DSL building on extensions of the Formalised Process Description (FPD) [9]. Product design (with variants) is a crucial part of CPPS planning as the 2 https://github.com/tuw-qse/cpps-var-case-studies 1 Attribute "length": { type: "Number", unit: "mm" } variants and parameters determine the production processes and resources. ...
... If no variability meta-model is available (e.g., for industry representations), these transformation operations define a mapping between the industry engineering artifact and the well-known variability model. Transformation algorithms implement the transformation operations between two concrete variability model types (e.g., feature model to decision model) or the industry representation to a variability model (e.g., the PPR DSL [16] to a feature model) Based on learnings from earlier work [6], we map all product variability concepts of the PPR DSL to concepts of feature models. We accommodate for specific concepts of the PPR DSL, which a feature model cannot represent, e.g., custom attribute definitions or constraints based on these custom attributes, by storing them in feature properties. ...
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A Domain-Specific Language for Connecting Product-Process-Resource Models with Dependencies
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A Guide to the SQL Standard, vol. 3
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C. J. Date and H. Darwen, "A Guide to the SQL Standard, vol. 3," 1987.