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Abstract

We introduce TERMS, an open-source Fortran program to simulate near-field and far-field optical properties of clusters of particles. The program solves rigorously the Maxwell equations via the superposition T-matrix method, where incident and scattered fields are decomposed into series of vector spherical waves. TERMS implements several algorithms to solve the coupled system of multiple scattering equations that describes the electromagnetic interaction between neighbouring scatterers. From this formal solution, the program can compute a number of physically-relevant optical properties, such as far-field cross-sections for extinction, absorption, scattering and their corresponding circular dichroism, as well as local field intensities and degree of optical chirality. By describing the incident and scattered fields in a basis of spherical waves the T-matrix framework lends itself to analytical formulas for orientation-averaged quantities, corresponding to systems of particles in random orientation; TERMS offers such computations for both far-field and near-field quantities of interest. This user guide introduces the program, summarises the relevant theory, and is supplemented by a comprehensive suite of stand-alone examples in the website accompanying the code.

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Article
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We present a method for determination of the random-orientation polarimetric scattering properties of an ar-bitrary, nonsymmetric cluster of spheres. The method is based on calculation of the cluster T matrix, from which the orientation-averaged scattering matrix and total cross sections can be analytically obtained. An efficient numerical method is developed for the T-matrix calculation, which is faster and requires less com-puter memory than the alternative approach based on matrix inversion. The method also allows calculation of the random-orientation scattering properties of a cluster in a fraction of the time required for numerical quadrature. Numerical results for the random-orientation scattering matrix are presented for sphere en-sembles in the form of densely packed clusters and linear chains. © 1996 Optical Society of America.
Article
Waterman'sT-matrix approach is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the extinction cross-section for randomly-oriented non-spherical grains. Numerical results are presented for randomly-oriented oblate and prolate spheroids and Chebyshev particles composed of astronomical silicate. These results are compared with those for spherical grains, and possible influence of the shape of dust grains on the value of interstellar extinction is considered. The range of validity of the Rayleigh approximation for computing extinction efficiency factors for randomly-oriented non-spherical grains is discussed.
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