Article

The association of perceived sociability and social intelligence with loneliness in online learning among nursing students

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Abstract

Background As a result of the decrease in socialization levels in computer-supported collaborative learning settings and/or interactions in social environments during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the adverse influence on the social intelligence development of nursing students could trigger loneliness. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of perceived sociability and social intelligence on loneliness in online learning among nursing students in Turkey. Design Descriptive, correlational and predictive study. Setting and participants A total of 246 nursing students in the Nursing Department of a state university in the Istanbul province of Turkey were included. Methods Data were collected using the Participant Information Form, Sociability Scale, UCLA Loneliness Scale-8 (ULS-8) for the Adolescents, and Tromso Social Intelligence Scale (TSIS) between November 2020 and December 2020. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of loneliness. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The total mean Sociability Scale score was 23.54 ± 7.51 (range: 10–46). The total mean TSIS score was 74.15 ± 9.98 (range: 46–105) and the total mean ULS-8 was 13.91 ± 4.98 (range: 7–27). Perceived sociability in online learning (β = −0.321, p < .001), and social intelligence (β = −0.347, p < .001) were significant negative predictors (R² = 0.269, p < .001) of loneliness. Conclusion Perceived sociability in online learning and social intelligence was associated with the level of loneliness of this population during online learning.

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... As a result of these efforts, educators began searching for optimal ways to find appropriate approaches to effectively deliver course content online [11,12,19,21]. Studies [10,[21][22][23] conducted to date among health professions students indicate that e-learning was well received, especially in terms of time management and performance, but less so in terms of content understanding and further explanation, methodology, technical, and behavioural challenges encountered due to the long period without face-to-face interaction. In a sample of nursing students, Warshawski [13] found that despite the acknowledged positive effects of e-learning, firstyear students experienced increased workloads, difficulty managing and understanding study materials, and a lack of learning interaction. ...
... Some researchers have studied the technological components of e-learning systems, while others have looked only at the effect of the human factor of learning and teaching through these systems in terms of student and teacher satisfaction [9]. While these individual assessment frameworks offer some practical solutions, they meet the needs only to a limited extent and, most importantly, do not meet the needs of all participants in the pedagogical process [13,17,21,23]. The e-learning evaluation scale (3E-Scale) we developed includes four concepts to measure students' perceived satisfaction with the pedagogical process within e-learning. ...
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This paper compares the effect of social isolation on students enrolled in online courses versus students enrolled in on campus courses (called in this paper Face-to-Face or F2F). Grade data was collected from one online section and two F2F sections of a computer literacy course that was recently taught by one of the authors of this study. The same instructor taught all sections thereby providing a controlled comparison between the two forms of teaching (F2F and online). This paper first introduces the plan and the limitation of this study. It provides a literature review and notes the trend of social isolation found in online courses. This paper then presents a summary of the collected data; and offers a conclusion based on the collected data.
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Are online activities devoid of emotion and social intelligence? Graduate students in online and blended programs at Texas Tech University and the University of Memphis were surveyed about how often they laughed, felt other emotions, and expressed social intelligence. Laughter, chuckling, and smiling occurred “sometimes,” as did other emotions (e.g., anticipation, interest, surprise). The capacities comprising social intelligence were also experienced “sometimes,” but more frequently in online classes than in non-class-related online activities. The students were mostly likely to present themselves effectively and care about others and least likely to sense others’ emotions. In a comparison of social intelligence capacities in the online course and other non-course-related but online activities (e.g., surfing and gaming), a paired t-test confirmed that the means were different (p < 0.05) and perhaps documented greater occurrence of social intelligence in the online course setting.
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This paper briefly addresses the multiplicity of definitions of online communities that exist either explicitly or implicitly. It goes on to argue that success online communities have to have well designed usability and well supported sociability (Preece, 2000). The rest of the paper briefly reviews findings from two related areas of work in which the author is involved: empathy and hostility, lurking and posting. Findings from both reveal the complexity and subtlety of people's online behavior. Questions for further research are also raised. The paper ends by returning to the dual themes of sociability and usability and points out that although studying social interaction online is challenging for researchers, it provides the basis for sociability and usability design which ultimately influences the success of online communities.
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Describes loneliness as a natural response of the individual to certain situations and not as a form of weakness. Emotional and social isolation (as 2 distinct forms of loneliness) are delineated, as well as feelings of emptiness, anxiety, restlessness, and marginality. Examples from case studies are included. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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