Article

Incidence of protected and illegally sourced birds at bird markets in Makassar, Sulawesi

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Abstract

Bird trade has led to increasing endangerment of species throughout South-East Asia. An opportunistic survey of two bird markets in Makassar, Sulawesi, Indonesia, highlights continuing problems with illegal trade. In June 2019, a total of 63 species, accounting for 6,352 birds, were observed in two Makassar bird markets. The majority of the birds observed were native to Indonesia, but not necessarily native to Sulawesi, illustrating the movement of birds for commercial trade across the archipelago. Fifteen of the species observed are protected under Indonesian legislation, and the vast majority of the rest were likely to have been taken from the wild outside of Indonesia’s annual harvest and trade quota system. Such illegal trade is a major contributing driver to the decline in wild populations and undermines national legislation and conservation efforts.

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... Nevertheless, there are no trade records for the species in Java in recent published studies Chng et al, 2015, nor have they been recorded in studies in Sumatra (Shepherd, 2006;Chng et al, 2018a). The only recent trade numbers for the species are from Bali (n=175) (Chng et al, 2018b) and Makassar, Sulawesi (n=42) (Shepherd & Leupen, 2021). Pale-headed munias, occurring on Sulawesi, the Lesser Sundas and Timor-Leste, have not been recorded in previously published Indonesian market surveys. ...
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In the market for extinction: the cage bird trade in Bali
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