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A Convex Modular Modelling (CMM) framework for developing thermodynamically consistent constitutive models

Abstract

This paper presents a theoretical framework termed the convex modular modelling (CMM) framework, which provides a convenient and expedient approach for constructing thermodynamically consistent constitutive models. This paper demonstrates how the CMM framework can be used to build increasingly complex constitutive models by mixing and matching re-usable components from a library of convex base functions in a systematic manner. It also describes the use of the modified LogSumExp (MLSE) function as a general and smooth approximation to the pointwise maximum function for any yield function (e.g. the Mohr-Coulomb/Tresca yield function). The MLSE function is then used to develop several new yield functions such as a convex and smooth approximation of the Matsuoka-Nakai yield function, a generalised polygonal yield function and a ‘Reuleaux triangle’-shaped yield function. As CMM is simple to use, it potentially offers a more accessible path for constitutive modellers to take advantage of the hyperplasticity framework to develop robust constitutive models.
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