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Collaborative Iconic And Symbolic Representation Activities Using Edusemiotics In English As A Second Language (ESL): A Philosophical Approach

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Edusemiotics constitutes a base on which educational theories lay rather than another teaching method. Even though it dates back to St. Augustine's work, it is relatively new in the frames of the academic literature. Signs operate as mediators in several educational relational concepts (teacher-student, body-mind). Edusemiotics can be put into practice through iconic learning and symbolic representation activities which can be enhanced using technology and more specifically computers, which are an image-based tool. The notion of collaboration is also introduced here since it is a means of not only building strong connections between the learners but also of leading to a more enriched way of thinking. Teachers' intervention is necessary since students can easily deviate from collaborative techniques and work in a more familiar to them way, individualistically. For these interventions to happen smoothly, teachers should also be able to establish a caring environment in the classroom. Taking a grasp from philosophy of education, it is suggested that when simple signs are turned into complex structures, learning occurs when a discovery of similarities takes place.
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