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Understanding Role of Fonts in Linking Brand Identity to Brand Perception

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Abstract

This study aimed to examine role of fonts as a vehicle in linking identity to perception of selected brands. Fonts are crucial constituent in the entire gamut of visual communication of brands. They communicate a brands’ identity through two means: explicit and implicit. Explicit aspect consists of physical dimensions such as weight, contrast, stress, x-height etc. Implicit aspect implies semiotics exuded by fonts formed at sub-conscious level and vary with change in identity a brand intends to communicate. The examination of symbiotic relationship connecting specific dimensions of font evaluated on basis of their ability to make text more readable and attractive with specific semiotics and how does such association vary with brand identity was the main focus of this study. This was achieved by conducting two experiments. Secondly, influence of explicit and implicit means of communication on linking identity with perception was examined through mediation analysis. Results showed direct effect of explicit aspect to be significantly reduced with inclusion of semiotic impact emphasizing importance of their congruency. Such inference is important in logo design, as it indicated that a brand communicating a message should use font with specific dimensions reflecting particular semiotics so as to influence customers’ perception of brand favourably.

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This edited collection presents state-of-the-art reviews of the latest developments in multisensory packaging design. Bringing together leading researchers and practitioners working in the field, the contributions consider how our growing understanding of the human senses, as well as new technologies, will transform the way in which we design, interact with, and experience food and beverage, home and personal care, and fast-moving consumer products packaging. Spanning all of the senses from colour meaning, imagery and font, touch and sonic packaging, a new framework for multisensory packaging analysis is outlined. The chapters also engage with increasingly important aspects of the packaging industry such as waste, product attention, and online environments. Including a number of case studies and examples, this book provides both practical application and theoretical discussion to appeal to students, researchers, and practitioners alike.
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What political candidates say during their campaign and when they say it are critical to their success. In three experiments, we show that abstract, "why"-laden appeals are more persuasive than concrete, "how"-laden appeals when voters' decision is temporally distant; the reverse is true when the decision is imminent, and these results are strongest among those who are politically uninformed. These effects seem to be driven by a match between temporal distance and the abstractness of the message that leads to perceptions of fluency, and the ensuing "feels right" experience yields enhanced evaluations of the focal stimulus. (c) 2008 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc..
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Brand identity complements brand equity and it forms an important part of the strategic management of brands. Identity elements include a well-known brand name, logo, font type, symbols, colour, shape, as well as unique product and benefit descriptions. These different elements can contribute to distinct consumer perceptions of various brands in the marketplace and help to differentiate brands from competitors. Brand managers need to start with a vision of what they want their brand to represent and then use the appropriate identity elements to build the brand. Some brand identity components may be influential to choice at the subconscious level of consumers, and therefore the understanding of individual psychological processes of perception and social meaning is required by brand managers.
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