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warning Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease

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Abstract

Heart disease often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart problems. Or, you may not realize you are developing heart disease. The warning signs of heart disease may not be obvious. Also, not every person has the same symptoms. Certain symptoms, such as chest pain, ankle swelling, and shortness of breath may be signals that something is wrong. Learning the warning signs can help you get treatment and help prevent a heart attack or stroke.
warning Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease,Complications and Prevention.
Author.
Hayk S. Arakelyan. Full Professor in Medicine,
Doctor of Medical Sciences, Ph.D , Grand Ph.D .
Senior Expert of Interactive Clinical Pharmacology , Drug Safety,
Treatment Tactics, General Medicine and Clinical Research.
President of Rare and Incurable Diseases Association.
Yerevan-Armenia, Tokyo-Japan.
“Natural forces within us are
the true healers of disease.”
“ Hippocrates”
Introduction.
Heart disease often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart
problems. Or, you may not realize you are developing heart disease. The warning signs of heart disease may not be
obvious. Also, not every person has the same symptoms.
Certain symptoms, such as chest pain, ankle swelling, and shortness of breath may be signals that something is
wrong. Learning the warning signs can help you get treatment and help prevent a heart attack or stroke.
Chest Pain.
Chest pain is discomfort or pain that you feel along the front of your body, between your neck and upper abdomen.
There are many causes of chest pain that have nothing to do with your heart.
But chest pain is still the most common symptom of poor blood flow to the heart or a heart attack. This type of chest
pain is called angina.
Chest pain can occur when the heart is not getting enough blood or oxygen. The amount and type of pain can vary
from person to person. The intensity of the pain does not always relate to how severe the problem is.
Some people may feel a crushing pain, while others feel only mild discomfort.
Your chest may feel heavy or like someone is squeezing your heart. You may also feel a sharp, burning pain in your
chest.
You may feel the pain under your breastbone (sternum), or in your neck, arms, stomach, jaw, or upper back.
Chest pain from angina often occurs with activity or emotion, and goes away with rest or a medicine called
nitroglycerin.
Bad indigestion can also cause chest pain.
Women, older adults, and people with diabetes may have little or no chest pain. Some people have symptoms other
than chest pain, such as:
Fatigue
Shortness of breath
General weakness
Change in skin color or greyish pallor (episodes of change in skin color associated with weakness)
Other symptoms of a heart attack can include:
Extreme anxiety
Fainting or loss of consciousness
Lightheadedness or dizziness
Nausea or vomiting
Palpitations (feeling like your heart is beating too fast or irregularly)
Shortness of breath
Sweating, which may be very heavy
Shortness of Breath.
When the heart can't pump blood as well as it should, blood backs up in the veins that go from the lungs to the heart.
Fluid leaks into the lungs and causes shortness of breath. This is a symptom of heart failure.
You may notice shortness of breath:
During activity
While you're resting
When you're lying flat on your back -- it may even wake you from sleep
Coughing or Wheezing.
Coughing or wheezing that doesn't go away can be another sign that fluid is building up in your lungs. You may also
cough up mucus that is pink or bloody.
Swelling in the Legs, Ankles, or Feet.
Swelling (edema) in your lower legs is another sign of a heart problem. When your heart doesn't work as well, blood
flow slows and backs up in the veins in your legs. This causes fluid to build up in your tissues.
You may also have swelling in your stomach or notice some weight gain.
Narrowed Blood Vessels.
Narrowing of the blood vessels that bring blood to other parts of the body may mean you have a much higher risk
for heart attack. It can occur when cholesterol and other fatty material (plaque) build up on the walls of your arteries.
Poor blood supply to the legs may lead to:
Pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or discomfort in the muscles of your feet, calves, or thighs.
Symptoms that often appear during walking or exercise, and go away after several minutes of rest.
Numbness in your legs or feet when you are at rest. Your legs may also feel cool to the touch, and the skin may look
pale.
A stroke occurs when blood flow to a part of the brain stops. A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack."
Symptoms of stroke can include difficulty moving the limbs on one side of your body, one side of the face drooping,
difficulty with speaking or understanding language.
Fatigue.
Tiredness can have many causes. Sometimes it simply means that you need more rest. But feeling run down can be a
sign of a more serious problem. Fatigue may be a sign of heart trouble when:
You feel much more tired than normal. It's common for women to feel severely tired before or during a heart attack.
You feel so tired that you can't do your normal daily activities.
You have sudden, severe weakness.
Fast or Uneven Heartbeat (Palpitations).
If your heart can't pump blood as well, it may beat faster to try to keep up. You may feel your heart racing or
throbbing. A fast or uneven heartbeat can also be the sign of an arrhythmia. This is a problem with your heart rate or
rhythm.
Complications of heart disease.
Complications of heart disease include:
Heart failure. One of the most common complications of heart disease, heart failure occurs when your heart can't
pump enough blood to meet your body's needs. Heart failure can result from many forms of heart disease,
including heart defects, cardiovascular disease, valvular heart disease, heart infections or cardiomyopathy.
Heart attack. A blood clot blocking the blood flow through a blood vessel that feeds the heart causes a heart
attack, possibly damaging or destroying a part of the heart muscle. Atherosclerosis can cause a heart attack.
Stroke. The risk factors that lead to cardiovascular disease can also lead to an ischemic stroke, which happens
when the arteries to your brain are narrowed or blocked so that too little blood reaches your brain. A stroke is a
medical emergency — brain tissue begins to die within just a few minutes of a stroke.
Aneurysm. A serious complication that can occur anywhere in your body, an aneurysm is a bulge in the wall of
your artery. If an aneurysm bursts, you may face life-threatening internal bleeding.
Peripheral artery disease. When you develop peripheral artery disease, your extremities — usually your legs —
don't receive enough blood flow. This causes symptoms, most notably leg pain when walking (claudication).
Atherosclerosis also can lead to peripheral artery disease.
Sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest is the sudden, unexpected loss of heart function, breathing and
consciousness, often caused by an arrhythmia. Sudden cardiac arrest is a medical emergency. If not treated
immediately, it results in sudden cardiac death.
Prevention of heart disease.
Certain types of heart disease, such as heart defects, can't be prevented. However, the same lifestyle changes that
can improve your heart disease can help you prevent it, including:
Control other health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.
Exercise at least 30 minutes a day on most days of the week.
Eat a diet that's low in salt and saturated fat.
Maintain a healthy weight.
Reduce and manage stress.
Practice good hygiene.
If you have any questions concerning “ warning Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease,Complications and
Prevention”, interactive clinical pharmacology , or any other questions, please inform me .
Prof. Hayk S. Arakelyan
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