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Is the novel suspension exercises superior to core stability exercises on some EMG coordinates, pain and range of motion of patients with disk herniation?

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Information about comparing the effectiveness of exercise methods on management of disk herniation is limited. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two programs of suspension and core stability exercises on some electromyography (EMG) coordinates, pain and range of motion of patients with disk herniation. Thirty-two men with disk herniation participated in this clinical trial study which was randomly divided into three groups of suspension exercises (n: 12, age: 34.25 ± 8.81, BMI: 24.01 ± 2.7), core stability exercises (n: 10, age: 35 ± 10.3, BMI: 25 ± 2.27) and control (n: 10, age: 34.4 ± 6.67, BMI: 23.76 ± 1.45). Electrical activity of rectus abdominis, internal and external oblique and erector spinae muscles was masured by superficial EMG, back pain by McGill Pain Questionnaire and range of motion by Modified Schober test, one day before and immediately after of intervention period. The experimental groups performed an 8-week training period while the control group was only followed up. Data were analyzed using paired sample t test and analysis of covariance test and statistical significance was set at 0.05. Suspension group showed significant improvement in EMG of rectus abdominis, internal and external oblique muscles (respectively, p = 0.030, p = 0.017, p = 0.022) and pain (p = 0.001) compared to core stability group; but there was no significant difference between two groups in EMG of erector spinae muscle and range of motion. Changes in both training groups were significant in all variables compared to control groups (p ˂ 0.05). Our findings showed that although both exercises were effective in patients with lumbar disk herniation, but the effectiveness of suspension exercises in increasing muscle activation and reducing pain was more pronounced than core stability exercises. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT): IRCT20191016045136N1.
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Sport Sciences for Health (2022) 18:567–577
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11332-021-00848-2
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Is thenovel suspension exercises superior tocore stability exercises
onsome EMG coordinates, pain andrange ofmotion ofpatients
withdisk herniation?
YasserMohebbiRad1· Mohammad RezaFadaeiChafy1 · AlirezaElmieh1
Received: 7 July 2021 / Accepted: 23 September 2021 / Published online: 20 October 2021
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature 2021
Abstract
Information about comparing the effectiveness of exercise methods on management of disk herniation is limited. The aim
of this study was to compare the effect of two programs of suspension and core stability exercises on some electromyogra-
phy (EMG) coordinates, pain and range of motion of patients with disk herniation. Thirty-two men with disk herniation
participated in this clinical trial study which was randomly divided into three groups of suspension exercises (n: 12, age:
34.25 ± 8.81, BMI: 24.01 ± 2.7), core stability exercises (n: 10, age: 35 ± 10.3, BMI: 25 ± 2.27) and control (n: 10, age:
34.4 ± 6.67, BMI: 23.76 ± 1.45). Electrical activity of rectus abdominis, internal and external oblique and erector spinae
muscles was masured by superficial EMG, back pain by McGill Pain Questionnaire and range of motion by Modified Schober
test, one day before and immediately after of intervention period. The experimental groups performed an 8-week training
period while the control group was only followed up. Data were analyzed using paired sample t test and analysis of covari-
ance test and statistical significance was set at 0.05. Suspension group showed significant improvement in EMG of rectus
abdominis, internal and external oblique muscles (respectively, p = 0.030, p = 0.017, p = 0.022) and pain (p = 0.001) compared
to core stability group; but there was no significant difference between two groups in EMG of erector spinae muscle and
range of motion. Changes in both training groups were significant in all variables compared to control groups (p˂0.05). Our
findings showed that although both exercises were effective in patients with lumbar disk herniation, but the effectiveness of
suspension exercises in increasing muscle activation and reducing pain was more pronounced than core stability exercises.
Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT): IRCT20191016045136N1.
Keywords Suspension exercise· Core stability· Electromyography· Disk herniation
Introduction
Disk herniation can be defined as displacement of disk mate-
rial beyond the margins of the intervertebral disk space [1] It
is considered the most frequent cause of lumbosacral radicu-
lopathy [2]. Lumbar disk herniation affects about 39% of
chronic low back pain (LBP) patients [3]. Pain is caused by
herniated disk pressure on nerve roots and the spinal cord in
patient with disk herniation and causes failure or weakness
of muscles around spine [4]. The most effective muscles
involved in trunk stability include multifidus, erector espinae
(ES), rectus abdominis (RA), internal oblique (IO), external
oblique (EO) and transverse abdominis (TA) [57]. Research
shows that the electrical activity of these muscles is reduced
by LBP [8, 9]. Also, pain and decrease in normal spine func-
tion lead to reduced lumbar range of motion (ROM) [10].
Core stability exercise is one of the most commonly used
rehabilitation strategies for improving dynamic stability of
the lumbar spine in people with chronic LBP [11]. Core
stability refers to an effective recruitment of core muscles
(including the abdominal, back, pelvic and hip muscles)
leading to an optimal production of force and precise con-
trol of lumbopelvic–hip movement, as well as appropriate
load transfer from the spine to the pelvis and distal segment.
As such, it is thought to be a determinant factor for effective
motor performance [12]. Past research has been shown that
* Mohammad Reza Fadaei Chafy
mfadaei2000@yahoo.com
1 Department ofPhysical Education andSport Science,
Faculty ofHumanities, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad
University, Rasht, Iran
Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved.
... Nustatyta, jog norint sumažinti nugaros skausmą, pratimai, atliekami ant nestabilaus paviršiaus, yra veiksmingesni nei tokie patys pratimai, atliekami ant stabilaus paviršiaus (Marshall, & Murphy, 2008). Nestabilumą galima sukelti atliekant stabilizavimo pratimus ant nestabilių plokštumų (Rad, Chafy & Elmieh, 2021) arba naudojant funkcinius diržus (TRX) (Melrose & Dawes, 2015). Stabilizavimo pratimai ant nestabilių plokštumų stiprina stuburą stabilizuojančius raumenis (Gianola et al., 2016;Shin, 2014;Thuc, 2018), o dėl to sumažėja skausmas (Dillen et al. 2021). ...
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